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Notre Dame alumnus withdraws from consideration as director of national intelligence

first_imgThis report was updated August 2 at 2:45 p.m.Notre Dame alumnus and congressman John Ratcliffe (R-TX) withdrew from consideration as the next director of national intelligence, President Donald Trump announced Friday in a tweet.“Our great Republican Congressman John Ratcliffe is being treated very unfairly by the LameStream Media,” Trump wrote in his tweet. “Rather than going through months of slander and libel, I explained to John how miserable it would be for him and his family to deal with these people.”Notre Dame alumnus John Ratcliffe withdrew from consideration Friday as next director of national intelligence.Ratcliffe announced he was withdrawing from consideration in a statement provided minutes after Trump’s tweet.The congressman said he “remains convinced” that if he was confirmed, he would have served the country with integrity and objectivity.“However, I do not wish for a national security and intelligence debate surrounding my confirmation, however untrue, to become a purely political and partisan issue,” the statement said, referencing the conversation around his potential appointment. “The country we all love deserves that it be treated as an American issue. Accordingly, I have asked the President to nominate someone other than me for this position.”Trump had announced Ratcliffe as a nominee in a tweet Sunday. If confirmed by the United States Senate, Ratcliffe would have replaced Dan Coats, a former Indiana senator who held the position since March 2017.”I am pleased to announce that highly respected Congressman John Ratcliffe of Texas will be nominated by me to be the Director of National Intelligence,” Trump said in the Sunday tweet. “A former U.S. Attorney, John will lead and inspire greatness for the Country he loves.”According to Ratcliffe’s campaign website and the United States Congress Biographical Directory, he earned a scholarship to Notre Dame and graduated after three years in 1987. He went on to earn his J.D. from Southern Methodist University in 1989.A New York Times profile of the congressman said he was elected to Congress in 2014 after defeating incumbent congressman Ralph Hall in the Republican primary. Ratcliffe, who gained support from the tea party in his initial bid for Congress, drew national attention after he “sharply challenged” former special counsel Robert Mueller at a House Judiciary Committee hearing July 24.Tags: American Politics, Director of National Intelligence, Donald Trump, John Ratcliffelast_img read more

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The Story of BRO

first_img “Who’s Blue Ridge Outdoors?”A guy in jean cut-off shorts is standing next to me, shirtless, sweating in the late August heat and casually sipping out of a pint glass at Ocoee Fest. He’s barefoot and a little drunk—standard protocol for any kayaking festival.“It’s a free regional magazine based out of Charlottesville, ” I begin, launching into my elevator speech on Blue Ridge Outdoors. As travel editor, I have answered this question hundreds of times before. Despite having had a few beers myself, I switch into cruise control and let my mouth do the talking while my brain reels in the shocking aftermath of his question.For shame, I think to myself. How can you not know what Blue Ridge Outdoors is?!Maybe he lives under a rock, I reason. He is a raft guide, after all. Even so, the river he works on, the Ocoee River, is in the heart of our coverage. His job, his passions, are our bread and butter. There is no excuse for this ignorance.“Oh!” he says after my spiel is over. The light bulb comes on. His eyes widen and I feel a faint flicker of hope. “I bought my first backpack from you guys!”Not quite.Blue Ridge Mountain Sports, a Virginia-based outdoor outfitter, is what most newcomers to the magazine associate with when they hear “Blue Ridge Outdoors.”I sigh, abandoning my disappointment in the raft guide’s failed realization. It’s not his fault. I hand him a sticker with our motto, “Go Outside and Play,” and a copy of the latest issue. He thanks me, raising his glass to the sky before taking a drink and rejoining the festivities. Later that night, I would see the same guy thrashing about in front of the stage, moving surprisingly in-rhythm with the band. When the music had stopped, he turned to leave and saw me near the middle of the pack.“Hey!” he shouted. “It’s the chick from Blue Ridge Outdoors!”Well, I thought, at least he remembered the magazine’s name.He barreled through the crowd to give me a high five. The bumper sticker I’d given him earlier was slapped crookedly across his bare chest. I smiled. Mission accomplished.SPEND YOUR MONEY ON SPORTS…WE’RE FREE.Just two decades ago, I wouldn’t have been so surprised to learn that this raft guide from Tennessee was unfamiliar with the publication. In fact, 20 years ago, my job, and that of more than half the magazine’s present-day staff, wouldn’t have even existed.Born in a windowless basement on 220 South Street in Charlottesville, Va., Blue Ridge Outdoors barely resembled the comprehensive regional publication it is today. Created by outdoor enthusiast John Blackburn, a graduate student at the University of Virginia and a contributing journalist for C-Ville Weekly, the early pages of BRO only covered Charlottesville-based adventures—directions to Blue Hole, best hikes in the Shenandoah National Park, how Devils Knob got its name. Everything was black and white, and the first three issues in 1995 were tucked neatly into the folds of C-Ville Weekly as a seasonal insert.“Most business startups fail,” says Rob Jiranek, BRO’s first publisher and, at the time, publisher for C-Ville Weekly. “The chances of having a magazine actually succeed back then were about 1 in 11. It was like getting into Harvard.”Despite the odds against them, Jiranek and Blackburn made the most of those early days and their five-person team. Just two years later, the magazine became a monthly, though its content remained limited to the mountains of Virginia.“It was a real petri dish of outdoor creativity,” says Jiranek of the office dynamic.With no budget for photography, Blackburn used his own pictures to accompany the stories, most of which he wrote himself. The staff at BRO sold ads by day, wrote stories at night, and somehow managed so scrape together an impressive issue each month. Part regional events calendar, part storytelling platform, the early issues of the magazine were characterized by witty writing and the authentic voices of writers who lived and breathed adventure in the Blue Ridge.By 2001, the team decided to spread the magazine’s coverage farther south and open a North Carolina office in Asheville. The decision would mark an important turning point in the growth of the magazine, setting the stage for BRO to evolve as the region’s definitive resource for outdoor adventure.A CHANGING LANDSCAPEWill Harlan was the first employee hired at the new North Carolina office. A top trail runner and outdoor writer, he became the magazine’s editor-in-chief, a position he has held for the past 14 years. As BRO’s most senior staffer, Harlan has helped the magazine expand its content and reach.“It’s a privilege working with this team. They are like family,” Harlan says. “The magazine has grown and evolved over the years, but we’ve always stayed true to our roots—edgy, original, authentic content.”Travis Searcy, who was hired a few months after Harlan, knows all-too-well just how far the magazine has grown. Brought on as a graphic designer in the Charlottesville office, Searcy says the layout process, called a “paste-up,” didn’t use PDFs or Adobe design software—all he needed was a printer, some scissors, and a little glue.“I would literally paste the ads onto the pages, then we’d mail that to the press, they’d photograph it, make plates, then print the magazine,” Searcy says.The layout process wasn’t the only thing that evolved. Steven McBride, a North Carolina-based photographer who has published the most BRO covers, remembers when he used to FedEx transparency slides to Harlan for cover photo submissions.“Back in the film days, everything was different,” McBride says. “Cameras were bigger and heavier. Lighting was harder to deal with. Photoshop back then was barely in existence.”But what BRO lacked in production resources, it made up for ten-fold in its unquestionable commitment to providing quality content. The magazine flourished. As the years passed, technology improved seemingly overnight, website redesigns came and went, and distribution doubled. By the time the magazine’s future owner, Blake DeMaso, got his hands on BRO, the publication had extended its editorial content to include adventures as far south as Georgia all the way up through West Virginia.“I love the mountains and I love the Blue Ridge. It’s where I grew up,” DeMaso says. “I identified with the magazine from day one.”The year was 2003 and DeMaso, having worked for several years in publishing for Condé Nast, was ready for a change in pace. He approached Jiranek near the end of the year about possibly becoming a business partner, and ended up with more than he bargained for. By March of 2004, DeMaso was the new owner of BRO.“I was only 30 years old, and I was very scared,” DeMaso remembers. “I was now in charge of a monthly magazine, a website that was six months out-of-date, five employees in Charlottesville, three in North Carolina, eight computers, a copier machine, a fax machine that didn’t really work, and a ping pong table.”But, really, what more do you need?PLAY HARD, WORK HARDThe Charlottesville BRO headquarters fit in one room. Located in a basement, the place had shoddy Internet and a drafty window. In the winter, staff wore fingerless gloves to keep their hands warm while they worked.“I used a desk made out of cardboard boxes for at least three months,” DeMaso says.With a ping-pong table in the middle of the room, a dartboard on the wall, and a regular littering of broken rubber bands on the floor from the daily rubber band wars, the first BRO office looked less like a magazine headquarters and more like a frat house.But when you play hard, you work hard, too. Thanks to the early efforts of a passionate group of people, the magazine is now distributed from Atlanta to Baltimore and covers adventures from Kentucky to the coast. Not long after DeMaso took over, the staff doubled in size, the magazine became full-color throughout, it expanded its page counts, added a glossy cover, and revamped its logo. The best part? It remained a free publication.“The goal from day one was always to provide free information to inspire people to go outside,” DeMaso says. “I think our goal will never change.”The stories that fill the magazine’s pages now reach over 300,000 readers every month. The advent of social media platforms brought new ways of engaging an ever-expanding audience and sharing news in real time. The magazine’s presence at regional events swelled to over 30 in a season with regular co-hosting of other races, music festivals, and events across the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic.Yet despite the changes, at its core, Blue Ridge Outdoors remains dedicated to the founding principle of the passion project that Jiranek and Blackburn gave life to: the idea that the great outdoors encompasses more than just the places where we play—they represent a way of living, a story worth telling, an environment in need of protecting, and a wildness within that we all are preserving. last_img read more

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Outdoor Updates: NC Wildlife Commission seeks public help in tracking hellbenders

first_imgOctober is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. As of early this week, Buzulencia has raised nearly $12,000 in support of the cause.  Wildlife officials in North Carolina are asking anglers and other members of the public to keep an eye out for hellbenders—the giant salamander found in fast-moving, clean mountain streams in the mountains of Western North Carolina. Hellbenders can grow up to 2 feet long and look a little frightening, but they are not dangerous. NCDOT plans statewide network of greenway trails A trail runner from Beacon, New York is attempting to run a section of the Appalachian Trail in record time while raising awareness about domestic violence. Greg Buzulencia will attempt to run the 88-mile section of the Appalachian Trail that runs through New York state in 24 hours. Buzulencia will attempt his run on Oct. 3. NCDOT is asking the public to fill out two surveys about how they use greenways and where they would like to see new trails built. The surveys can be found at www.ncdot.gov/divisions/bike-ped/great-trails-state/.  Beginning the week of October 1 and continuing through mid-December, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) will stock approximately 120,000 hatchery raised adult Rainbow, Brown and Brook Trout in more than 100 streams and lakes, PFBC said in a news release. The stockings will provide ice fishing opportunities throughout the winter. “Fall can be one of the most scenic and enjoyable times of year to spend a day fishing, and we’re excited to provide a special opportunity for those anglers who love fishing for trout,” said Brian Wisner, Director of the PFBC Bureau of Hatcheries.  The hellbender, also known as “snot otters” and “water dogs,” have disappeared from much of their habitat due to habitat degradation and are listed as a species of special concern in the state. Reported sightings help the agency inventory and monitor how the hellbender is fairing. Anyone who finds a hellbender is asked to leave it alone but note the location or GPS coordinates, take a photo, and email all information of Lori Williams at lori.williams@ncwildlife.org or call 866-318-2401. New York man attempts trail running record on AT while raising awareness about domestic violence NC Wildlife Commission seeks public help in tracking hellbenders The North Carolina Department of Transportation is working to identify a plan to connect greenway trails statewide as part of the Great Trails State Plan. The plan focuses on multi-use trails for walking, running and cycling. Stocked trout extends fishing opportunities in PA this fall and winter Photo courtesy of Getty Images by JasonOndreickalast_img read more

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Laura Curran Shares Vision, Challenges as Long Island’s First Female County Executive

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Last month, in a frigid outdoor ceremony, Democrat Laura Curran was sworn in as the first female Nassau County executive. During the ceremony, she vowed to “root out the corruption that has plagued our county and give Nassau the fresh start it so desperately needs.”The former two-term county legislator from Baldwin lives by the mantra: Respect taxpayer dollars and make government work for those it serves. The Press spoke to Curran before her trip to Albany to talk about politics and some of her plans for the county, how she manages it all while raising three daughters, and how she feels about being the first woman in the post. At the end of our interview, she was still humble and even funny.“It may sound corny, but I am truly honored to be serving as Nassau County Executive,” she says. “We all know we have serious challenges, but we also have incredible opportunities. And my team and I are off to a strong start.”Long Island Press: How bad is the assessment problem?Laura Curran: It’s bad. We have a serious financial problem and a serious assessment problem, and they are a bit intertwined. We cannot address one without fixing the other. The assessments were frozen in 2011, and since then we had an unfair shift in the property tax burden, and we’ve got to address that.LIP: How bad are the county’s finances?LC: For the first time in its 18 years in existence, [the Nassau Interim Finance Authority] has imposed cuts, cuts to the tune of $18 million, and the county must report back to NIFA on the cuts by mid-March.LIP: Will you honor that order? How will you achieve those cuts?LC: Well, we have to do it. NIFA has imposed a deadline by March 15th, so we have to honor that.LIP: Why did you sign your executive order barring appointees from leadership roles in the party and donating to your campaign?LC: It was a campaign promise, and I thought it was very important to deliver on that promise as soon as possible because I want there to be no question as to why I am appointing people in government. It is to serve the residents of Nassau County, right? It is the government of the people of Nassau. I want there to be no question as to why they are there.LIP: What is your economic development vision?LC: This is something I am very passionate about. I have appointed a deputy county executive for economic development specifically, which we haven’t had for a long time, because I believe we need to have that laser focus. I am committed to transit-oriented developments. I am committed to working with Supervisor [Laura] Gillen in the Town of Hempstead to develop the Hub in a way that makes it a live-work-play destination. The county owns it and the town zones it. It is very important that she and I work together and we are off to a very good start. That and Belmont is a great opportunity right there for real economic development, and we want to make the most of it. We’ve got to keep our young people. We’ve got to have a wide variety of housing options at different price points to keep our young people and attract young people, which will then bring the jobs.LIP: How important is the third- track project to Nassau?LC: I am super excited about the third track because it will help foster that kind of transit-oriented development along the main line that we need in places like Westbury. Mineola is off to a strong start, with transit-oriented development. Plus, people will be able to reverse commute. It would help people to get on and off and around the Island, which we need for economic development. Young people don’t want to drive as much, and the more people can get around, the more people are going to want to live here. The other thing I am very excited about is East Side access. We have a few years before it’s done, but this will allow people who live on Long Island to travel into the city and land at Grand Central, so they don’t have to do those three trains to schlep over to the East Side. This would be huge for our real estate market. It will be huge for attracting more people to live here since the commute will be so much easier to the East Side. [Suffolk] County Executive [Steve] Bellone and I did a tour of it my second week in office. We have a few years to go. They said five years. We are just keeping our fingers crossed.LIP: Are you excited for the return of the Islanders?LC: Oh yes! That is incredible. Not only does it mean jobs, support for local business, and growing the tax base, it also shows the world that Nassau is the place to be. I’m a huge Islanders fan.LIP: How does it feel to be the first female Nassau County Executive?LC: When I was running I did not make a big deal about gender because I did not want that to be the reason people were voting for me. That being said, I have to say I am very proud of that fact.LIP: As a mother of three, how do you manage to juggle it all?LC: It’s a juggling act. It’s kind of a problem that any working mother has. It is the same thing. You make it work. In some ways you can never totally solve it. You just do your best.LIP: Does your day really ever end? It’s not 9 to 5. Do you even sleep?LC: I just have to make sure in my schedule that I bank in family time because if my home team is not solid, I am not going to be effective at work. Sometimes I have to miss a concert but I try and book that far in advance. Even if it means spending a Saturday at home with the kids, doing nothing, I think that is really valuable when I can get away with it.LIP: What is for dinner tonight?LC: That is a great question. I think we are doing a Mexican casserole with chicken. It’s really good.LIP: Are you making it?LC: I have to say that I am not making it. It will be ready for me when I get home. I will be eating it … gratefully.LIP: What do you like to do in your free time?LC: My favorite thing to do is read a really good book. I like a wide range of books. I love nonfiction, fiction, literary fiction. The last book I read was Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan. It was really good. I recommend it to anyone.LIP: I know you enjoy yoga.LC: I try and make a little time in the morning to exercise. I don’t always succeed in doing that, but I love it. It is just a good way to stay calm.LIP: Who are some of your role models?LC: Someone I admire is Margaret Thatcher, more on style than substance. She was a tough woman, and she made tough choices, and I don’t always agree with the choices she made, but I admire the way she handled herself and got things done.Left to right: NY Islanders John Tavares, Andrew Ladd, Nassau County Executive Laura Curran, and Islanders Johnny Boychuk and Cal Clutterbuck.last_img read more

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New tourist offer of Lonjsko polje: Solar-powered boat ride on the river Strug

first_imgIn addition to solar-powered boats, canoes await visitors at the Plesmo pier. Important information for travel agencies is that boats will be able to be used on weekends and holidays with prior reservation, and during the week by appointment. Also, from the Krapje Visitor Center to the pier in Plesmo, visitors will be driven by an oldtimer tractor with a trailer. “Discover the Undiscovered – is a slogan that encourages guests to come to the Lonjsko Polje Nature Park, but also guides us in the development of visitor infrastructure and content. Namely, we who work in Lonjsko polje, as well as those who live here, know how important perspective is for experiencing the beauty of the local nature. That is why we want to provide visitors with a unique view of Lonjsko polje – both the one from the lookout point and the one from the river ”, He said Ivor Stanivuković, director of the Lonjsko polje Nature Park Public Institution. The second largest nature park in Croatia, Lonjsko polje Nature Park, guided by the slogan “Discover the Undiscovered ”, continues to develop its tourist offer. Lonjsko polje Nature Park is the second largest nature park in Croatia. In order for visitors to leave it with as many fond memories as possible, great attention is paid to the development of the visitor infrastructure and content. “Solar-powered boat rides in Struga allow tourists to sail silently into beautiful nature. They will pass by beaver habitats, see cattle grazing, experience the flight of birds for which Lonjsko polje is known among ornithologists around the world…” concluded Stanivuković. As of this weekend, two solar-powered boats will sail along the Strug River from the pier in the village of Plesmo. These are almost silent vessels that will enable tourists to discover the beauty of the hitherto self-contained tributary of the Sava River.  Photo: Tomislav Korlast_img read more

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Lipton to mastermind Singaporean UK drive

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Juventus chief Andrea Agnelli ‘greets’ Maurizio Sarri on morning of Europa League final

first_img About Connatix V67539 ADVERTISEMENT Agnelli has official ECA business in Baku ahead of the Europa League final (Picture: Getty)Juve already have a good relationship with Chelsea – having loaned Gonzalo Higuain to the Blues during the January window – and Agnelli had lunch with chairman Bruce Buck during his time in Baku.Although Sarri guided Chelsea to a third-place finish in the Premier League and two Cup finals, he failed to win over fans and the west London club were considering parting ways even before Juve’s interest materialised.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal According to Tuttosport, who have pictures of Agnelli at Baku’s Four Seasons Hotel, the two men greeted each other and spoke very briefly.AdvertisementAdvertisementWhile it is highly unlikely they discussed a possible move to Turin just hours before the biggest game of Sarri’s Chelsea tenure, Agnelli’s appearance at the Chelsea team hotel feels significant – it was his personal touch that persuaded Cristiano Ronaldo to leave Real Madrid last summer.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityOfficially, the Juve chief is in Baku as part of his role as president of the ECA (European Club Association), with a meeting being held ahead of the match.Nevertheless, Chelsea are believed to be willing to negotiate Sarri’s exit just a year into his reign at the club, with talks planned for the day after the final. Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 29 May 2019 12:36 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link341Shares Juventus chief Andrea Agnelli ‘greets’ Maurizio Sarri on morning of Europa League final Video Settings PLAY center_img Full Screen The Chelsea boss is Juve’s top pick to succeed Max Allegri (Picture: Getty)Juventus chairman Andrea Agnelli has been staying at the same Baku hotel as Chelsea and reportedly spoke briefly with Maurizio Sarri on Wednesday morning.The Chelsea manager – who blew up during his side’s final training session before facing Arsenal last night – is the one of the top targets to succeed Massimiliano Allegri as the next Juve boss.Although he insists his sole focus is on winning the Europa League, Sarri got a brief distraction when he bumped into Agnelli on the morning of the game.Esclusivo: #Juve, #Agnelli a #Baku da #Sarri! ⬇️ https://t.co/leksdbvP83— Tuttosport (@tuttosport) May 29, 2019 Comment Advertisement 1 min. story Advertisementlast_img read more

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Gov. Wolf Joins Legislators, Advocates for Virtual Event on One-Year Anniversary of Clean Slate Automatic Sealing

first_imgGov. Wolf Joins Legislators, Advocates for Virtual Event on One-Year Anniversary of Clean Slate Automatic Sealing SHARE Email Facebook Twitter June 30, 2020center_img Criminal Justice Reform,  Press Release Governor Tom Wolf participated in a virtual event today to mark the one-year anniversary of Clean Slate automatic record sealing in Pennsylvania. The governor joined a Zoom panel with legislators and advocates for the event sponsored by Community Legal Services, The Clean Slate Initiative, Justice Action Network and Center for American Progress.“On this one-year anniversary of clean slate implementation, we celebrate the countless lives this law has changed all across the commonwealth,” Gov. Wolf said. “I’m proud that Pennsylvania is leading the way in second chances and excited to see our Clean Slate law serve as a national model for commonsense, bipartisan criminal justice reforms.”In 2018, Pennsylvania was the first in the nation to enact Clean Slate legislation, which expands criminal record sealing to include more types of offenses, including some first-degree misdemeanors, which can be sealed by filing petitions.The law also created an automated computer process to seal arrests that did not result in convictions within 60 days, summary convictions after 10 years, and some second and third-degree misdemeanor convictions if there are no subsequent misdemeanor or felony convictions for a period of 10 years after the time of conviction. The automatic sealing provision went into effect on June 28, 2019.During its first year of implementation, Clean Slate in Pennsylvania has automatically sealed 35 million records.The virtual panel, moderated by Justice Action Network president and executive director Holly Harris, focused on the bipartisan approach of Clean Slate and additional criminal justice reforms the state has enacted as well as proposed legislation that expand and eliminate obstacles for Clean Slate that could increase the number of cases automatically sealed.Here are the Clean Slate numbers-to-date in Pennsylvania:36,735 Individuals have had Clean Slate applied to a misdemeanor conviction.1,148,696 Individuals have had Clean Slate applied to their record. That includes misdemeanor convictions, summary convictions and non-conviction dispositions.2,062,108 offense tracking numbers have had Clean Slate applied to that arrest. That includes misdemeanor convictions, summary convictions and non-conviction dispositions.For more information on Clean Slate or to seek help in accessing the program, visit mycleanslatepa.com.Ver esta página en español.last_img read more

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SNAP! Govt agencies inventing numbers to meet targets on social issues

first_imgStuff co.nz 17 February 2016Family First Comment: Snap! This is what our report on child abuse and the failure of the smacking law last week said also: “The report cites Child Youth and Family’s statistics for child abuse and neglect as an example of particular concern, with a large gap between its recorded cases of abuse in 2014-15 and those recorded by police.”Government agencies are “inventing” new numbers and changing the definitions of targets to make their performance seem better, a damning report says.The Salvation Army says the organisations feel under pressure from the Government to come up with favourable results, creating an attitude where they “find any reason to celebrate success or progress”, regardless of their original goals.The charitable organisation’s State of the Nation report attacks the ways in which government agencies appear to be using targets, and the numbers behind them, in a “less than straightforward and reliable manner”.The report says agencies have been using a number of “subtle and ingenious approaches” to improve their performance against targets.They include changing the definitions behind indicators to make results appear better, “inventing new numbers” that are difficult to verify, and changing the way figures are reported without improving the reliability of information provided.“This can cause us to slip into a ‘moveable feast’ mentality, where we find any reason to celebrate success or progress, even though we have lost our sense of the purpose behind it all.”READ MORE: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/76957685/government-agencies-inventing-numbers-to-meet-targets-says-reportlast_img read more

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Syracuse lands 2021 4-star recruit Benny Williams

first_imgThe Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission.The Orange landed 2021 four-star forward Benny Williams on Thursday, one day after four-star 2020 center Frank Anselem committed to SU. Williams is SU’s first verbal commit for the 2021 class.Williams, who chose SU over Maryland, Georgetown and Miami, said in his Instagram decision video that he’s “excited to play for coach Boeheim in front of the best fans in the country in the greatest arena in college basketball.” Facebook Twitter Google+ A Potomac, Maryland native, Williams started playing basketball at the Bowie Boys and Girls Club. At St. Andrews Episcopal High School, he became his class’s best prospect in the state, according to 247 Sports.The 6-foot-8 small forward is the 47th ranked recruit overall in the 2021 class. Syracuse associate head coach Adrian Autry was the primary recruiter for both Williams and Anselem.“I think I can come in and impact the program right away and hopefully lead them to a national championship,” Williams told 247 Sports. Published on June 4, 2020 at 7:46 pm Contact Danny: dremerma@syr.edu | @DannyEmerman Commentslast_img read more

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