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A Brexit checklist for UK pension funds

first_imgWhile UK politicians have voted against a ‘no-deal’ Brexit, much uncertainty remains about the outcome with more parliamentary votes to come and the approval of the EU yet to be secured. Hogan Lovells’ Faye Jarvis explores the risks for UK trusteesKey pointsUK trustees have a duty to review the effect of a ‘no-deal’ Brexit and should understand the impact on the sponsor’s businessEU data transfer and overseas payments are potential issuesRestrictions on insurers could affect cross-border paymentsTrustees should discuss contingencies with non-EU managers and advisers if they have not already done soContingent asset claims in EU entities could be complex to enforce in practice DataTrustees should actively consider whether any of their members’ data is transferred to countries in the EU and, if so, seek advice on whether any action needs to be taken to ensure data can continue to flow in the event of a no-deal Brexit. (L-R) Dominic Raab, UK minister for exiting the EU, and Michel Barnier, the EU’s chief negotiator, at a press conference last yearA number of steps are being taken by both the UK and individual jurisdictions in the EU to try and minimise any possible disruption. For example, the UK government has announced that it intends to help EU firms continue to do business with UK clients, at least for a transitional period, by giving them temporary permissions and, more recently, the Financial Conduct Authority has signed a “multilateral MoU” with regulators in the remaining 27 EU member states to facilitate co-operation and information-sharing across areas of financial services including the asset management industry.  However, uncertainty still remains.While a no-deal Brexit should not prevent trustees using EU structures – for example a fund domiciled in an EU member state, such as an Irish UCITS fund – in a no-deal scenario, a trustee’s UK investment advisers and managers may be more restricted in terms of the activities they can carry out in the EU.The position may also be different in different jurisdictions, as although EU countries are passing legislation to allow UK financial services companies to continue to carry on their activities in a no deal Brexit, they are not doing so on the same terms. At this stage, trustees should speak to their investment advisers and managers to understand any potential impact.  On a slightly separate note, it is unclear whether some pension schemes may have to start clearing derivative transactions and so this is another area that trustees will need to monitor with their investment advisers.Contingent assetsFinally, if we do end up with no-deal Brexit, trustees with contingent assets from a European entity may want to take advice on how easy it will be to enforce a claim against that asset.While a no-deal Brexit should not automatically result in any contingent assets terminating, it may mean that any claim under the contingent asset agreement becomes more difficult to enforce – particularly if there is a dispute and the parties cannot agree which courts should hear the matter.The UK has recently signed up to the Hague Convention on Choice of Law Agreements to ensure that clauses in new agreements granting the English courts exclusive jurisdiction over any dispute continue to be recognised. However, it is less clear what the position will be for existing agreements in the event of a no-deal Brexit.With two weeks to go until the UK’s scheduled departure from the EU and the threat of a no-deal Brexit still looming (albeit reduced), there are several issues of varying complexity and significance for trustees to be aware of and actively engage with.The best advice at this stage may well be to seek advice on how to mitigate against any complications arising from the EU and the UK failing to ratify an exit deal.   Faye Jarvis is a partner at Hogan Lovells “Brexit may mean that any claim under a contingent asset agreement becomes more difficult to enforce”Faye Jarvis, Hogan LovellsIn this scenario, cross-border transfers of data between the UK and EU will no longer automatically be permitted. The UK has confirmed that it would continue to allow personal data to be transferred to the EU, although this would be kept under review. This should make it possible to transfer data to a processor in the EU, provided there is a data processing agreement in place.The position is more difficult where both parties are data controllers. The EU would need to grant the UK an “adequacy decision” in order to allow data controllers in the EU to transfer data to the UK, which is unlikely in a no-deal scenario and the EU won’t make a decision on this until after Brexit.In these circumstances, further contractual arrangements would need to be put in place to ensure the flow of data across borders can continue.Overseas paymentsAnother cross-border issue that should be on trustees’ radar is payments to pensioners living overseas. There are two possible areas of concern: payments to pensioners from an occupational pension scheme, and payments to pensioners from a buyout.With regard to the former, in a no-deal Brexit it will still be possible for trustees to pay pensioners living in the EU by payment to an EU bank account.center_img However, these payments may take longer because, post-Brexit, the UK will not be subject to the Payment Services Directive, which requires that all intra-EU payments must be made no later than the next working day.  After Brexit, it is possible that payment times might take longer for non-EU institutions. That said, there is no reason why UK and EU banks cannot continue on a ‘next-working-day’ basis. Fees could also rise for payments into the EU.To mitigate potential administrative delays, trustees should keep a close watch and consider alerting overseas pensioners if there are going to be any significant changes to the date of receipt of pension payments.BuyoutMuch has already been made of the fact that, post-Brexit, an insurer authorised in the UK may be prohibited from paying annuities to members living in the EU.A UK insurer would also be prohibited from issuing individual policies to pensioners or deferred members located in the EU, which in theory could make things difficult for schemes looking to towards a buyout.Insurers are already looking at how to address this issue and some EU countries may introduce legislation to allow payments to be made, at least in the short term – but there is no consistent approach.Trustees considering a buy-in or buyout, and with members who are resident in EU countries, should discuss this with their insurer to understand how they will manage this issue.Cross-border providersInvestment advisers and managers, both in the UK and in the EU, are similarly grappling with how a no-deal Brexit will impact on their ability to provide services to their UK pension scheme clients. One of the biggest risks for pension schemes in a ‘no-deal’ Brexit scenario is an adverse impact on the employer covenant. The Pensions Regulator (TPR) recently issued a statement that “trustees should undertake a review of any actions or contingency plans in the context of ‘no deal’, if they have not already done so”.  Adopting a ‘wait and see’ approach is no longer an option. If they have not already done so, trustees should engage with employers to understand what impact a no-deal Brexit could have on their business and what plans they have in place to mitigate these risks.last_img read more

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Wenger rules out Henry move

first_img Wenger, however, insists there are no plans for a repeat move this season. “At the moment Thierry is invited just to practise when he can and when he wants,” said the Arsenal manager. “We have a big staff, a very competent one, and we have the right number to support the team to achieve the targets. “Thierry is a player, one day certainly it will be different, but at the moment no.” Henry signed from Juventus in 1999 and went on to help the Gunners to Premier League success as part of Arsene Wenger’s Invincibles side of 2003/2004 before leaving for Barcelona in the summer of 2007. During his loan spell last year, Henry scored both against Leeds in the FA Cup and then a winner in stoppage-time at Sunderland on his last appearance. The presence of such inspirational former players can only have a positive impact on the current squad, who moved four points clear at the top of the Barclays Premier League with victory over Southampton on Saturday. Wenger said: “They have no real target to bring something, they just want to enjoy themselves and keep their fitness. Manager Arsene Wenger has ruled out a move to bring former striker Thierry Henry back to Arsenal for a third spell, but will always welcome old players to the club’s training complex. Press Association Both 36-year-old Henry – now playing for the New York Red Bulls in the United States – and former midfielder Robert Pires, who turned 40 last month, have been using the Gunners’ Hertfordshire base to help keep up their fitness levels. Henry, Arsenal’s all-time record scorer with 228, returned to Arsenal for a loan spell in January 2012. “Usually they don’t practise with the first team, because they come in and work on fitness. “It is a little bit less competitive, but when we have some room we invite them to play with us. “They integrate well [with] the spirit of the team.” last_img read more

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Francesco Guidolin watches Swansea beat Watford thanks to Ashley Williams goal

first_img Guidolin’s appointment was confirmed before kick-off and the former Parma, Palermo and Udinese coach took his place in the stand as Swansea sought to escape the bottom three. The 60-year-old, who has brought in the former Chelsea midfielder Gabriele Ambrosetti to assist, will work alongside interim manager Alan Curtis, though the Italian will have the final say on team selection. Guidolin witnessed a pretty drab opening with Jack Cork’s wayward effort the only shot in the first 20 minutes. Watford barely mustered an attack in the first half but might have been awarded a penalty after 21 minutes when Kyle Naughton handled right on the edge of the area. Odion Ighalo failed to direct his header goalwards under pressure from Federico Fernandez but, as Jose Manuel Jurado kept the move going, Naughton appeared to move his arm towards the ball. Watford appeals were conspicuous by their absence, however, and the Hornets were soon behind after Andre Ayew had tested Hornets goalkeeper Heurelho Gomes for the first time. Ki Sung-yueng retrieved a loose ball down the right and his cross was met by Williams, who took advantage of Miguel Britos misjudging the flight by directing his header goalwards for the first goal from any Swansea defender since March 2014. It was only the fifth time Swansea had scored the first goal in 22 Premier League matches this term but it prompted a surge in confidence with the Watford defence at full stretch not to concede a second. Jurado tried to spark Watford into life either side of the break with attempts from distance and Britos went close when he sent Ben Watson’s delicious free-kick on to the roof of the net. Cork volleyed over for Swansea but there was an anxiety about their play which reflected the importance of the situation. With main striker Ayew dropping ever deeper to influence matters, there was no central figure to hold the ball up and the lively Jurado fired wide as Watford pushed for an equaliser. But Swansea saw their own penalty shout ignored when Watson leaned into Neil Taylor’s shot with referee Michael Oliver adjudging the contact was more shoulder than arm. Watford came within inches of equalising late on when Juardo almost punished Taylor’s error but Swansea substitute Bafetimbi Gomis struck a post in stoppage time as they held on to move a point above Newcastle into 17th place. TWEET OF THE MATCH ” Incredible – a #Swans defender scores a goal for the first time in 22 months. Ki cross, Williams rises to nod home from eight yards 1-0 27m” – South Wales Evening Post reporter Gareth Vincent registers his surprise at source of Swansea’s winner. PLAYER RATINGS Swansea Lukasz Fabianski 6 (out of 10) Kyle Naughton: 6 Federico Fernandez: 7 Ashley Williams: 8 Neil Taylor: 7 Leon Britton: 7 Jack Cork: 7 Ki Sung-yueng: 5 Wayne Routledge: 6 Gylfi Sigurdsson: 7 Andre Ayew: 7 Substitutes Modou Barrow (on for Routledge 66mins): 6 Bafetimbi Gomis (on for Ayew 82mins): 6 Jordi Amat (on for Ki 87mins): 6 Watford Heurelho Gomes: 6 Allan Nyom: 6 Miguel Britos: 5 Craig Cathcart: 6 Nathan Ake: 5 Ben Watson: 7 Etienne Capoue: 5 Jose Manuel Jurado: 7 Valon Behrami: 6 Troy Deeney: 6 Odion Ighalo: 5 Substitutes Juan Carlos Paredes (on for Nyom 74mins): 6 Obbi Oulare (on for Behrami 88mins): 6 STAR MAN ASHLEY WILLIAMS: Grabbed the all-important Swansea winner with his first goal for nearly two years and his first in the Premier League at the Liberty Stadium. But the captain was just as important at the other end as he dealt with a succession of crosses which came his way and kept a cool head when the pressure was really on. MOMENT OF THE MATCH Tempting to say the final whistle as the relief which poured out from Swansea supporters shook the Liberty Stadium to its foundations. But Williams’ well-directed header was the stand-out moment, as much for as its rarity value as bagging three precious points to take the hosts out of the bottom three. VIEW FROM THE BENCH Interim manager Alan Curtis was taking charge of the team for the last time with new head coach Francesco Guidolin sat in the stand and set to pick the team from now on. Curtis must have been delighted with the effort from his players who gave him a second win in seven league matches. But it’s now four straight defeats for Watford and manager Quique Sanchez Flores must be concerned by the Hornets’ slump with the Igahlo/Deeney partnership suddenly firing blanks. MOAN OF THE MATCH The lack of quality. It is probably true to say standards are going to suffer when so much at stake and Swansea’s renowned passing game has certainly disappeared during their current relegation strife. But for much of this contest possession was frittered away too cheaply and the quality was not becoming of the “greatest league in the world”. WHO’S UP NEXT? Watford v Newcastle (Premier League, January 23) Everton v Swansea (Premier League, January 24) Swansea skipper and match-winner Williams was delighted to secure a vital three points for his side and take them out of the bottom three. “It’s massive, I think all the games are big for us now. We need points as quick as possible and try to move up the table to get out of this situation,” he told Sky Sports 1. The 31-year-old centre-half also revealed the playing staff knew Francesco Guidolin was going to be appointed Swansea head coach last night. Williams admitted that a new boss on the horizon may have been a factor behind an improved performance, but also paid tribute to caretaker boss Alan Curtis and said the players wanted to end his spell in style. “We heard the news last night and obviously everyone got on to Google and did their research and tried to find out as much as they can about him,” he added. “It looks like he’s got a good record. He’ll have been watching tonight so I think it gave everyone at the club a bit of a lift to go out and try and show what you can do, but also for Curt (Alan Curtis) as well who has done an amazing job.” Curtis thought his side were well worth the points, saying: “I thought so. In the first half especially I thought we controlled the game and it was one of our better performances of the season I’d say, but obviously we were a bit more tentative second half but I think that’s just the way it is at the moment.” When asked about Guidolin he added: “For the new manager looking in he can sort of assess what he’s seen, but I would have thought he would be more than pleasantly surprised with what he saw.” Watford boss Quique Sanchez Flores was disappointed with his side’s first-half display and the result, but pointed out that they were much improved after the break. “I was disappointed in the first half that we lost a bit of balance,” he said. “But I’m really happy with the performance in the second half. They had pressure with the ball they had.” A rare Ashley Williams goal, headed home from inside the six-yard box after 27 minutes, was enough to give Swansea only a third win in 18 league attempts and lift them out of the bottom three at the expense of Newcastle. It was far from pretty at times but that will not worry a Swansea side who inflicted a fourth straight league defeat on a Watford side suffering their worst run of the season. New Swansea head coach Francesco Guidolin saw his side ease their Barclays Premier League relegation worries with a hard-fought 1-0 win over Watford. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Holder hoping for Test dominance

first_img(CMC) – West Indies Test captain Jason Holder says he hopes to leave a legacy of being one of the greats in the longest format, but is cognizant of the need to sustain very high standards if he is to achieve that goal.Already, the 28-year-old has become one of the contemporary faces of the Test format, and is currently the number one all-rounder in the International Cricket Council (ICC) rankings.And though pointing out he enjoyed all three formats, Holder said he placed considerable emphasis on Test cricket which remained the measure of all cricketers.“Test cricket is the ultimate game for me,” Holder told TalkSport’s Cricket Collective.“Growing up there was only Test cricket and 50-over cricket, to be fair, and you always were marked and critiqued on your performance in Test cricket – you became a legend of the game through Test cricket.“I don’t think many people would stand out as being legends of the game via the one-day route but obviously with the advent of T20 cricket, there is a debate now with white-ball versus red-ball cricket but still I think red-ball cricket would take precedence, and I just want to be remembered for being a great Test match cricketer and not only a great Test match cricketer per se but a great cricketer.“In order to do that, you’ve got to be consistent, and more than likely every time you step on the park you’re being scrutinised and marked. So for me it’s about keeping my standards high and making sure I’m doing everything in my power to win cricket games for whoever I’m representing.”Holder shot to stardom last year when he struck a monumental unbeaten 202 to propel West Indies to a crushing victory over England in the opening Test at Kensington Oval last January.In reaching triple figures for the third time in his career, he became the first West Indies number eight to score a doubl-century in Tests and the first Windies captain since Brian Lara in 2004, to notch a double against England.Only the previous year, fast bowler Holder had captured 33 wickets at an average of 12.39 – the best average in a calendar for nearly a century. He currently averages 32 with the bat from 40 Tests and 26 with the ball.Though Holder averaged 49 with the bat and took 20 wickets at 17 apiece in Tests last year, he believes there was still much improvement needed.““I think if I look at it from a holistic point of view of all three formats, I don’t think it was my best year,” he explained.“I try to mark myself pretty hard and try to set pretty high standards as well. So coming off of 2018 where I felt I had the best year of my cricketing career, I think I probably fell back a little in 2019 but it’s a new year in 2020 – 2019 is behind us and for me it’s just getting myself attuned back to playing international cricket.“Hopefully we can get some Test cricket going again. I think Test cricket is the best way to get some cricket under your belt – you get some overs under your belt, you get time to spend in the middle and it’s not rushed. That puts my cricket in good stead.”last_img read more

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‘Horse race’: Big Ten title up for grabs in ’06-07

first_imgCHICAGO — With nearly every team around the Big Ten losing key members from last season, many coaches and players feel as though the conference will be a wide-open race this year.Only four teams return at least half of their scoring from a year ago and even less know what their starting lineup is going to look like as the season opener nears. This looming uncertainty is the exact opposite from last year, when it seemed as if every team was bringing back a veteran squad.”I think if you start asking all the coaches to name their starting lineup, it’s hard to figure out,” Iowa head coach Steve Alford said. “It’s unusual, but it is what makes this league so much more exciting. Last year we were a veteran league and had a lot of people coming back, this year we have a lot of newcomers.””I don’t know if it’s going to be as deep as it was last year,” Minnesota head coach Dan Monson added. “A lot of people have to answer questions along with us to know how good they’re going to be.”It’s a horse race, and we’re coming out of the gate in camp with a whip.”Even preseason favorite Ohio State has a number of questions to answer after losing four starters from a year ago, including last year’s Big Ten Player of the Year in Terence Dials.But with a heralded incoming class, no one’s really questioning the Buckeyes’ spot at the top.While Greg Oden headlines the newcomers, two other McDonald’s All-Americans — Mike Conley Jr. and Daequan Cook — join him, along with David Lighty and junior college transfer Othello Hunter.Ohio State’s freshmen have come into Columbus with high expectations, being compared to Michigan’s “Fab Five” of 1992, but with a new name — the “Thad Five,” referring to head coach Thad Matta.Matta, however, doesn’t feel any pressure with all the preseason expectations.”These guys have a pretty good feel for it,” Matta said. “They know last year nobody really knew we had a basketball team so they know there are guys out there just like them trying to get it done this year.”Another new faceWhereas many teams across the Big Ten will be sporting some new players on the court, only one team has a new head coach.Oklahoma’s Kelvin Sampson was named Indiana’s head coach in the offseason after Mike Davis’ resignation, and the move has provided some excitement for the Hoosiers’ players.”It’s been good for our players,” Sampson said. “They have some excitement and curiosity about the upcoming year … these kids have been great, and I applaud Mike Davis for that. We didn’t inherit any discipline problems.”For Hoosier players, it’s still an ongoing adjustment, changing from Davis’ style to Sampson’s.”Every coach has a different type of system,” IU guard Roderick Wilmont said. “[Sampson] is all about defense so you just try to get used to it. He just wants us to play hard.”Davis soon bolted for the University of Alabama at Birmingham after his departure and brought former IU guard/forward Robert Vaden with him as a transfer.Another player who was rumored to leave with Davis was Hoosiers’ star forward D.J. White, a preseason All-Big Ten selection this year.However, according to White, the thought never crossed his mind.”I never really considered transferring anywhere,” White said. “I just had to weigh my options to see what was the best for me, and my decision was to stay at Indiana.”One name tossed around the Indiana coaching rumor mill before Sampson stepped in town was Iowa’s Steve Alford.Alford, an IU alum who is the school’s all-time leading scorer, has been mentioned as a possible candidate for the job ever since Bobby Knight’s firing in 2000.So when the Hoosier chitchat swirled around Alford once again this year, it was nothing new to him.”It wasn’t tough because it’s been happening for eight years,” Alford said. “This was nothing new, it was just a different twist because a coach stepped down in January, but it’s always been there.”last_img read more

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Wilson: Parker’s consistency, elite scoring ability make him nation’s premier rookie

first_img Published on January 31, 2014 at 5:01 am Much debate has been made of this year’s class of talented freshmen. Syracuse’s Tyler Ennis and Duke’s Jabari Parker are two of them – arguably the two best – and Daily Orange beat writers Stephen Bailey and David Wilson make their respective arguments for the two rookies. See Stephen’s case for Ennis here. A week of conference play had gone by and something had gone horribly wrong for Duke.The Atlantic Coast Conference’s premier team was somehow only 1-2. Jabari Parker, its superstar freshman — the one who topped Wooden Award watch lists just weeks earlier — had suddenly become human.Maybe he was taking bad shots. Maybe he wasn’t multi-dimensional enough. Maybe his pedestrian defense had come back to haunt him — the basketball gods don’t like stuff like that.While the rest of the nation was relishing in the Blue Devils’ struggles, the 18-year-old forward would be tasked with righting the fast-sinking ship.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDuke topped Virginia in its next game to pull to .500 without much help from Parker, but it wasn’t a particularly impressive Blue Devil performance. Then North Carolina State came to town.Everything that Parker had failed to do well during the first four games of ACC play, he fixed against the Wolfpack. He scored 23 points, his most in 2014. He shot 50 percent from the field and drilled both of his 3-point attempts. He grabbed seven rebounds. He even played a little bit of defense, and Duke won 95-60.“Changing habits is not easy, especially when you’re so successful with those other habits,” Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski said after the game. “Today he really attacked.”Passiveness plagued his game for a couple of weeks, but when he’s playing active there’s no other freshman like him. He plays with the confidence of a senior and the skill of an NBA player. Even with Tyler Ennis, Joel Embiid, Andrew Wiggins and Julius Randle in this freshman class, Parker has consistently stood above the rest.He already outperformed Embiid and Wiggins with 27 points in a loss back in November, and Saturday is another prime opportunity to prove his rookie superiority. No. 17 Duke (17-4, 6-2 ACC) might not beat No. 2 Syracuse (20-0, 7-0) when they square off at 6:30 p.m. in the Carrier Dome, but with another chance against a star freshman in front of a national audience, he’ll remind everyone why he, and not Ennis, was the one with all the hype.Ennis has snatched some of those headlines away for two reasons. The first is how he seems to just keep getting better all season long.To put it in football terms, because the point guard position is so often compared to quarterback, at the beginning of the year he was a “game manager.”Now he’s also the closer.Parker’s been that all season long. Only twice this year has he been held to single digits, and never fewer than seven. Ennis has scored in single figures four times and was even shut out in 32 minutes against Eastern Michigan on New Year’s Eve.“Jabari’s one of the best players in the country,” Ennis said after the Orange’s 67-57 win against Wake Forest on Wednesday. “We’ll have to key in on him because he gets them going.”The second is Ennis’ clutch play. During SU’s win against the Demon Deacons, Ennis scored just two points in the first half and trailed during the second. The guard awoke and finished with 18.“I’ve been hearing real good things about him,” Parker said during the week. “He’s one of the big playmakers for their team.”The Blue Devils have largely avoided the need for Parker’s clutch play.Only three of Duke’s wins have come by single digits. He was benched for the end of the Blue Devils’ narrow loss to Notre Dame, but his consistent play has outweighed his relative deficiencies in the clutch.There’s good reasoning behind all the Ennis praise — a point guard is more valuable than a small forward — but almost every number points in Parker’s favor. He’s averaging 18.8 points to Ennis’ 12.3 and grabbing more than eight boards per game. He’s even shooting a higher percentage than Ennis despite the second highest usage (32.6) in the conference.For comparison’s sake, Ennis’ usage rate (20) ranks fourth on his own team among players who have played in at least 13 games. C.J. Fair’s 27.6 is eighth in the ACC.Their roles are different, and Ennis’ value is incredible to the Orange, but Parker’s game should be a familiar sight for Syracuse fans. There have been better freshmen than Carmelo Anthony, but Parker embraces comparisons to the one-and-done who brought SU its only national championship.After Saturday, maybe Orange fans will see that, too.David Wilson is a staff writer for The Daily Orange, where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at dbwilson@syr.edu or on Twitter at @DBWilson2. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Syracuse looks to iron out play against Colgate before heading into NCAA tournament

first_imgBefore Sunday, Syracuse was more than a month removed from its previous loss, and was riding a six-game winning streak that had saved its season.But after Sunday’s defeat, which awarded Notre Dame the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament championship, that run is no longer.“It put a little chip on our shoulder,” SU faceoff specialist Austin Wentworth said. “We have something to fight for, instead of being relaxed. “We can’t lose any more games. We need to treat every game like it’s the national championship.”Syracuse pulled off a furious last-second victory over Duke on Friday, but couldn’t repeat the magic against the Fighting Irish two days later, ending the torrid stretch of play that’s pushed the Orange back into the national discussion. No. 4 Syracuse (10-4, 2-3 ACC) has one more regular-season chance to reclaim some momentum to spark a run in the NCAA tournament, a 4 p.m. date with Colgate (9-6, 4-4 Patriot) in the Carrier Dome on Saturday. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Another loss could move us down. It’s an important game for us,” SU head coach John Desko said. “We just don’t want to go into the playoffs with (another) loss on our schedule. We know we’ve got our hands full come Saturday afternoon.”Syracuse’s seniors will play their final guaranteed game in the Carrier Dome against an upstate New York foe that peaked at No. 16 four weeks ago, but has since dropped out of Inside Lacrosse’s top 20. Although SU and the Raiders haven’t met in five years, they share a rivalry that dates back to 1921.“A lot of people think of it as an easy last game for Senior Day, but I like the route we took with a nice upstate rivalry,” senior faceoff specialist Chris Daddio said. “It’s a good game coming off a loss in the ACC championship to kind of find ourselves again. We still have a lot of work to do and this is a good game to do it.”Following the Orange’s 21-7 loss at Duke on March 23, Syracuse was two ACC losses away from going winless in its first year in the league. The team’s hopes of reaching the conference tournament were fading, and SU needed to provide substance to complement its top-ranked strength of schedule for the NCAA tournament selection committee. With SU’s back drawing closer and closer to the wall, the blowout loss at the hands of the Blue Devils lit a fire underneath the Orange, which pieced together six consecutive victories to qualify for the ACC tournament and boost its résumé for the national tournament.The last of those victories, the miraculous comeback against Duke, highlighted a weekend of three thrilling ACC showdowns.“They were some of the best lacrosse games all year,” Daddio said.But just two days after SU felt the excitement of a down-to-the-wire win, Notre Dame turned the tables on the Orange.The ACC trophy wasn’t SU’s most sought-after accomplishment of the year, but still one it wanted. When Notre Dame goalie Conor Kelly saved Kevin Rice’s potentially game-tying shot with three seconds left, SU players fell to their knees in anguish. Now they have to get back up for the rest of the ride.“Colgate’s a good team, so it’ll be a good transition from ACC play back into the playoffs,” senior goalie Dominic Lamolinara said. “But we can’t overlook them. I don’t think we’re going to.” Comments Published on May 2, 2014 at 4:38 pm Contact Phil: pmdabbra@syr.edu | @PhilDAbb Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Women of Troy compete at Allstate Sugar Bowl

first_imgThe USC women’s golf team, seeking its first tournament win of the year, extended its lead to four strokes after two days of play in the 2012 Allstate Sugar Bowl Intercollegiate Golf Championship.The tournament, held at the English Turn Golf and Country Club in New Orleans, is hosted by Tulane University and features 15 teams, including Pac-12 rivals Oregon and Colorado. The Women of Troy are the defending champions of the event, having won by four strokes over top-seeded Alabama in 2011.Leading the field · Sophomore Sophia Popov is tied for 10th place at the Allstate Sugar Bowl Golf Championship at three over par. The Women of Troy currently lead the tournament by four strokes. – Photo courtesy of Sports InformationThe Women of Troy have received strong performances from senior Lisa McCloskey and freshman Doris Chen, both of whom are in the running for the individual lead. McCloskey is currently second at 2-under 142, striking 1-under 71 in each round, while Chen is third at 1-under 143. McCloskey buried three birdies in the first five holes and finished with four overall, while Chen notched three birdies.Sophomore Sophia Popov overcame a rough start to birdie five of the final 10 holes, coming in tied for 10th at 3-over 147. Senior Inah Park is tied for 43rd at 9-over 153, while sophomore Rachel Morris is tied for 60th at 14-over 158.The Trojans opened the spring season with a resounding second-place finish at the Northrop Challenge, finishing at 30-over 882, behind only UCLA.The competition, which marked the team’s highest finish this year, also featured a strong performance by Popov, whose fall season was cut short after a wrist injury during the Stanford Intercollegiate Tournament in late October. Popov rebounded to finish second overall at 1-over 214, including an impressive final round in which she notched seven birdies and a score of 4-under 67.The tournament featured a consistent effort from all golfers. Chen, a highly touted recruit and former U.S. Junior Champion, recorded her best standing, finishing 10th at 8-over 221 to overcome a rough final round. Park recorded her third top 20 finish, coming in tied for 16th at 9-over 222.McCloskey finished tied for 23rd at 12-over 225 after remaining in top-10 contention the first two days. Morris finished at 18-over 231, tied for 46th. Though rain and gloomy conditions hindered performance and created considerable struggle on the final day, the Women of Troy maintained their second place standing from the previous two rounds, largely because of Popov’s stellar work.The Women of Troy have been working hard to replicate the success of their 2010-2011 campaign, in which they captured their fifth Top-5 NCAA finish in the last seven seasons. Even more impressive, they won four tournaments, including the 2011 Pac-10 championship and 2011 NCAA West Regional. Victories have been hard to come by, but the Women of Troy are maintaining confidence.“Our main goal is to win the event as a team and just try to play a solid tournament individually,” said Popov. “We just need to try to keep the momentum going.”Following the tournament, the Women of Troy will have three weeks off before continuing their season with the Battle at Rancho Bernardo March 18-20.last_img read more

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Youthful Badgers show promise

first_imgFredrick Ask is just one of the freshmen on this year’s squad after the Badgers lost five of their top six players from last year’s team that climbed to the Round of 16 in the NCAA Tournament. Experience is just one of the few things UW has had to overcome this year.[/media-credit]With seven freshmen on an 11-man team, the No. 73 Wisconsin men’s tennis team is in a rebuilding stage. The Badgers have even added four new players since January: Austin Akers, Fredrik Ask, Lucas Bin and Rod Carey.Yet head coach Greg Van Emburgh still feels good about the progression of his team.“I think overall our freshmen, since I’ve been here, in my sixth year now, they’ve been tremendous. I think they’ve all improved,” Van Emburgh said. “The first thing you look for as a coach is ‘have you gotten and developed a better student athlete.’ I think we’ve been able to do that. I think when you’re able to do that you’re also able to have success on the court, and we’ve been fortunate to do that as well.”This season, the Badgers have battled injury and sickness and are just trying to get healthy before the Big Ten Tournament, but one of the Badgers’ main problems this season has been their lack of experience.“It’s been one of those years where you’re rebuilding. We lost five out of our top six, and our main focus is getting them experience and getting healthy,” Van Emburgh says. “I feel like we’ve got a lot of potential with our players and they’re on board to have the success we’ve had within the last six years and gaining that experience. We’re just a young group right now, but the future of our team looks solid.”One freshman duo making the Badgers proud this season is Carey and Ask. In their time together, the pair is 3-1 in Big Ten play. They are gaining more experience with each match. While Ask is working to come back from a battle with mononucleosis early in the season, he enjoys playing with Carey.“We work well together; we have good chemistry together,” Ask said.Overall, four out of the Badger’s seven freshman are not from the United States. Ask, from Norway, stated that Wisconsin’s athletic program was one of the main reasons for choosing the university.But, as with any other freshman athlete, there are differences. Ask said there’s a big difference between playing internationally and playing collegiately.“For me, it was a big change from playing international tennis to college tennis. There’s a lot more screaming during the matches and no umpires,” Ask said.While transitioning, a lot is expected of freshman athletes at the collegiate level.“Overall you want to look at how hard they want to work and how competitive they are,” Van Emburgh said. “Obviously, they must be a great student athlete here at the university, so those are a few priorities and traits you definitely want to look at.”As their freshman season nears its end, the Badger men are looking to make a transition from being the underdogs. Van Emburgh said the change is vast.“I think the growth of the development and the experience, when you first come in here, you’re unsure of where you fit in and where you are. I think that and the experience with a year under your belt is huge.”As Wisconsin nears playing host to the Big Ten Tournament, each match provides more and more experience for the freshman. But, before the tournament, Wisconsin has a tough battle in No. 2 ranked Ohio State.“They’re a great team; they’ve done a great job with their program over the years,” Van Emburgh said. “We have good players; we just have to be loose and believe. We don’t have to beat them 10 times on Friday. We just have to go out there, play our best tennis at home and beat them once. I’m optimistic. The guys know the situation and what’s at stake, so hopefully they’ll come out there and be confident.”last_img read more

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