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Classrooms without walls

first_imgWhen Rebecca Pierre was 9, she would have breakfast each morning with local children attending a nearby summer camp. Day after day Rebecca, who had immigrated to South Boston at age 6, showed up at the camp and sat down to eat. Eventually, a senior counselor took Rebecca’s hand, brought her home, and talked to her mother about getting her enrolled.That was the beginning of Pierre’s commitment to, and passion for, the South Boston Summer Urban Program (SUP), a camp operated by the student-run Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA) out of Harvard University.Twenty-one years later, Rebecca is the director of that camp and a rising senior at Northeastern University. “SUP transformed me. It was a vital piece of my life, and a great part of my growth,” she said.Rebecca and co-director Monique Takla, a 2014 graduate of Harvard College, oversee the camp as two of the 1,500 student volunteers who help to keep PBHA running. The South Boston camp enrolls 50 campers a summer. Rebecca’s little brother is one of them.PBHA is the umbrella organization for 83 student-directed programs run by the student volunteers. The association works to meet critical local needs by providing vital resources to the community while helping to nurture public-service leaders. It’s often called “the best course at Harvard” because it provides students with knowledge and experiences that cannot be learned within classroom walls. Its programs serve close to 10,000 low-income people in Boston and Cambridge annually.SUP is a set of 10 student-run local camps, held at 12 sites. There are 11 days camps and an evening program in English as a second language for immigrant teens. The programs are staffed by more than 120 college students from various colleges and universities. The college students live in dorms on Harvard’s campus for the summer.The camps serve more than 900 low-income, at-risk youths ages 6 to 18. The camps last for seven weeks and cost only $120 per child, though no child is turned away because of an inability to pay.The programs provide a safe, supportive environment for children. They teach violence-prevention activities and serve as an avenue to stop summer learning loss. Research consistently shows that students, particularly those from low-income families, risk losing at least two months of literacy and math skills during the summer. The SUP camps work to stop those losses through activities that blend core academic areas with social and emotional development, and increased community awareness and activism.“The campers leave here with a real sense of community,” Pierre said. “A lot of what we do has a community angle. We have many different partnerships. We work with Marian Manor, a nursing facility down the road. We partner with South Boston Grows, which teaches the kids about urban gardens and healthy living, and we are constantly talking about how to make healthy life choices.”The summer programs are structured around curricular, classroom-based enrichment in the mornings and afternoons field trips around Boston.“PBHA’s SUP camps are a win-win for everyone,” said Maria Dominguez Gray, executive director of PBHA. “Campers and families benefit from enriching programming. Our junior teen counselors are engaged in meaningful employment that offers much-needed job and life skills. And the college students learn so much about themselves, about leadership, effective education, program development, and the various challenges facing urban communities. This is all learning that extends far beyond the classroom.”In addition to the camps in Boston and Cambridge neighborhoods, there are three that are subject-based. Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment serves 100 children from Dorchester, Mattapan, and South Boston. Refugee Youth Summer Enrichment serves more than 100 high school students from neighborhoods in Greater Boston. These camps target youths from more than 15 countries who have low English proficiency. The camps have been officially accepted by the Boston Public Schools as alternatives to summer school. The Native American Youth Enrichment Program serves more than 40 students and is the only urban camp in Massachusetts dedicated to meeting the academic, cultural, and social needs of local Native American youths.The Cambridge Youth Enrichment Program serves more than 160 children at three locations. Besides the camp in South Boston, there are also camps serving Chinatown (70 children), the Franklin Field and Franklin Hill housing developments in Dorchester (80 children), Mission Hill (80 children), and Roxbury (80 children). The Keylatch Summer Program serves 80 children living in housing developments in the South End and Lower Roxbury. 18Campers sang and chanted, with the guidance of Halie Olson, as they headed back to the Condon School after a field trip to Harvard Square. 1Halie Olson looks on as Jayden Melo, 7, gets a goodbye kiss from his mother, Carmen, on the first day of summer school at James F. Condon Elementary in South Boston. 13Andy Nova wanted to see the bunny’s whiskers. 11Sergio Lucero Ruiz needed lots of coaxing to even look at a bunny; a patient counselor eased him toward touching the animal. 8Northeastern student, South Boston resident, and camp co-director Rebecca Pierre (right) works with a misbehaving student on the first day. Pierre, who grew up across the street from the camp in South Boston, spent her summers attending SBOS. She lives in Harvard’s Lowell House with the other senior counselors this summer. 14Adonis Boyce stopped to greet the bunny before the class moved on. 7Counselors Sammy Cruz (center, left) and Beto Vargas play “the name game” — an orientation activity that helps students learn each other’s names. 12Students reacted to seeing a chicken. 9Shafique Holloway, 13, contributes to his classroom’s rules. 4Giovanni Ortiz watches as his son, Javier, high-fives senior counselor Halie Olson ’17 on the first day of camp. 15Julia Perez, 8, hugged a chicken at Farrington Farm. 3Jayden Melo (left) and Javier Ortiz warm up when they see that Cameryn Crowley has returned for another summer. Crowley, a camper since age 7, has moved through the ranks and now works as a junior counselor at South Boston Outreach Summer. 10Campers attend field trips like this one to the Farrington property in Lincoln, Mass., where they were introduced to animals they’d never seen before. 17Hands-on enrichment activities empower youth like Andy Nova, 8, who dared to come face-to-face with a chicken held by Jayden Melo, 7. 2Jaheim Peeple, 12, looks ambivalent on day one of camp. Run by Harvard’s Phillips Brooks House Association, the camp draws students from three public housing developments in Southie, and no child is ever turned away because of an inability to pay. 16The campers fed leaves to goats. 5Adonis Boyce (left) and Andy Nova are happy to see Cameryn Crowley, a junior counselor this year. The campers, ranging in age from 6 to 13, all meet in the cafeteria for breakfast each morning. 6Jonathan Pierre, 12, lists the rules his class has decided collaboratively to follow. Students come from one of three public housing developments in South Boston: Old Colony, Mary Ellen McCormack, and West Broadway. 19An especially exuberant Julia Perez sang as she walked along a Southie street. 20Camping can wear you out! Angelica Suazo, 9, gets a ride from camp co-director Rebecca Pierre (right).last_img read more

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Seven faculty members named British Academy Fellows

first_imgThis summer, the British Academy welcomed a new group of 86 Fellows in the humanities and social sciences to its ranks from the United Kingdom and around the world. Of the 30 overseas academics selected, seven are from Harvard:Homi Bhabha, Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities and Senior Advisor on the Humanities to the President and Provost in the department of comparative literatureKathleen M. Coleman, James Loeb Professor of the Classics and Senior Research Curator at Harvard Art MuseumsSheila Jasanoff, Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies at Harvard Kennedy School (HKSGeoffrey Jones, Harvard Business SchoolGülru Necipoğlu, Director of the Aga Khan Program of Islamic Architecture and Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Art in the department of history of art and architectureCharles Nelson III, professor of education, professor of pediatrics, professor in the department of society, human, development and health, professor of psychology in the department of psychiatry at the Harvard Graduate School of EducationKathryn Sikkink, Ryan Family Professor of Human Rights Policy at HKSThe fellows join a cohort recognized for their outstanding contributions to the humanities and social sciences. The British Academy offers fellowships, funding opportunities, and opportunities for engagement to leading scholars in the fields both in the U.K. and worldwide.last_img read more

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Jamestown Man Charged After Allegedly Smashing Out Window Of Alstar Ambulance

first_imgWNY News Now Stock Image.JAMESTOWN – A Jamestown man allegedly smashed out the back glass window of an Alstar Ambulance during an incident Friday afternoon, according to the Jamestown Police Department.Police say they responded to the intersection of Newland Avenue and Hazzard Street for a report of a disorderly male. They report Nicholas J. McAdoo, 28, allegedly fled the scene and was found a short distance away hiding in a garage.McAdoo was arrested and released on an appearance ticket for Jamestown City Court at a later date. He is charged with third-degree criminal mischief. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Court denies preliminary injunction in Vermont Yankee case

first_imgNorthstar Vermont Yankee,The Federal District Court for the District of Vermont issued a decision Monday evening in favor of the State of Vermont and denied Entergy’s request for a preliminary injunction that would have prevented the State from enforcing its laws during the pendency of the litigation. In a prepared statement, Attorney General William Sorrell called the decision ‘a very good first step in an important case.’ “The motion is denied,” wrote J Garvan Murtha, United States District Judge, “because Entergy has failed to show that any irreparable harm it may incur between now and a decision on the merits would be, or is likely to be, ameliorated by a preliminary injunction in the short time before this Court decides Entergy’s claims. Because the Court finds a preliminary injunction is not warranted between now and a decision on the merits in the fall, it need not, and expressly declines to, issue a holding regarding Entergy’s likelihood of success on the merits. The Court notes, however, that Entergy has raised serious questions regarding its Atomic Energy Act preemption claim, warranting further briefing and a prompt full-dress trial on the merits.”The issue for Vermont Yankee is whether they will, or even can at this point, order fuel to keep the plant going beyond the end of this year, when it is scheduled for refueling. The nuclear plant’s 40-year license expires in March 2012. The plant has received all federal approval for a 20-year relicensing, but still needs state approval, both by the state Legislature and by the Vermont Public Service Board. Entergy maintains that the state has over-stepped its bounds by requiring the legislative approval, which is the preemption claim.Laurence M Smith, Manager of Communications for Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, said in a statement, ‘We appreciate Judge Murtha’s timely and thoughtful decision on an issue that is critically important to our 650 employees and for all those who live in New England, although we are disappointed in the outcome. Our request for a preliminary injunction was about keeping the plant’s workers employed, the plant running safely and the electric grid reliable until this case is resolved. In the upcoming days, we will be evaluating Judge Murtha’s opinion and assessing the company’s near-term options.’On April 18, 2011, Entergy filed a complaint in federal district court against Governor Peter Shumlin, Attorney General William Sorrell, and members of the Vermont Public Service Board, seeking a ruling that federal law preempts Vermont laws and regulations regarding the operation of Vermont Yankee beyond March 21, 2012. Within days of suing the State, Entergy filed a motion for a preliminary injunction to enjoin Vermont from enforcing its laws during the pendency of the case. Both sides then filed extensive briefs, available here, and a hearing on the motion was held on June 23-24, 2011 in federal district court in Brattleboro.In its preliminary injunction decision, the Court agreed with the State and rejected Entergy’s argument that it would suffer irreparable harm during the pendency of the litigation. As the Court wrote, ‘where the preliminary injunctive relief ‘ which would be of very limited duration in this case ‘ does not operate to enjoin any acts before trial, and cannot redress or ameliorate any harm, it serves only as a preview of the Court’s views of the merits and is unwarranted.’Governor Peter Shumlin said in a statement: ‘In my judgment, Vermont has acted and will continue to act responsibly regarding our energy future, and we will continue to work hard to ensure that our laws are enforced and respected. Entergy’s lawsuit is an attack on state authority, attempting to deny us a voice regarding whether Vermont Yankee will run past March 2012’even though Entergy has known since 2002 that it could not operate the plant past that date without state approval. I believe strongly in the state’s authority, and I believe that Entergy has not been an honest, fair and responsible player for Vermont.’Attorney General William Sorrell noted that he looks forward to the upcoming trial on the merits: ‘We will continue to defend the constitutionality of Vermont’s laws regulating Vermont Yankee and will be working hard to prepare for the critical merits stage of this litigation.’ The case is currently scheduled for a trial on the merits beginning on September 12, 2011.Vermont Attorney General. July 18, 2011last_img read more

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Taming the digital risk tiger at credit unions

first_img continue reading » Providing easy digital access is table stakes among rising numbers of credit union members who need anytime, anywhere access to funds. But along with increased access come new risks as fraudsters shift their focus to digital theft of customer data, financial fraud and social engineering scams. Unfortunately, education only goes so far in protecting members from modern threats.Attacks at Epidemic ProportionsNumerous password breaches have perpetrated fraud-as-a-service schemes enabling nearly anyone with bad intent to enter the arena. Startling statistics underscore the rapid rise in cyber fraud directed at both members and employees of financial institutions:Card-not-present fraud rose by 17% in the first quarter of 2019; 88% of victims made a legitimate online transaction just before subsequent online fraud.Phishing attacks, attacks from roque mobile applications and malware are up significantly. For example, impersonations rose 56% between 2017 and 2018. Attacks from rogue mobile applications increased by 300% in the first quarter of 2019. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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USDA seeks more funds for food defense

first_imgFeb 13, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – The US Department of Agriculture is proposing a big increase in spending to protect the US food and agriculture system from terrorist threats and other disasters in fiscal year 2009, while seeking somewhat less money for avian influenza.The Bush administration’s proposed 2009 budget calls for $277 million for the various programs in its Food and Agriculture Defense Initiative, a $91 million increase from estimated spending of $186 million in fiscal year 2007, which ends Sep 30.The USDA budget summary lists $60 million for avian influenza control efforts by the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), down from $67 million in estimated spending this year. The cut reflects savings from a planned merger of the agency’s programs on highly pathogenic and low-pathogenic avian flu and after some one-time spending items this year, officials say.Also, the administration is proposing $1.09 billion for the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), a $22 million increase from this year’s estimated spending. At the same time, the budget report says the agency will seek congressional authorization to collect new fees worth $96 million a year from the food-processing plants it inspects. The FSIS monitors the safety of meat, poultry, and processed egg products.Final budgeting decisions require congressional action, which often is delayed until the new fiscal year is well under way. In addition, USDA Secretary Ed Schafer said on Feb 4 that the budget proposal is likely to require some changes after Congress enacts a new farm bill.”The President’s 2009 recommended budget for USDA is based on the provisions of the 2002 Farm Bill and reflects the administration’s proposals for change,” Schafer said at a briefing. “We expect some changes will need to be made to the budget estimates when a new farm bill is enacted, and I must say I am increasingly confident that that will happen.”Food defense fundingThe Food Safety and Defense Initiative is the collective name for various activities under the FSIS, APHIS, Agricultural Research Service (ARS), and the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES). Activities targeted for increases in the budget proposal include:ARS food defense research, from $9 million this year to $23 millionARS agriculture defense research, from $25 million to $39 millionSurveillance by APHIS for plant pests and animal diseases, from $63 million to $98 millionAPHIS’s National Veterinary Stockpile of vaccines, personal protective equipment, and other supplies, from $4 million to $8 millionAPHIS efforts related to plant and animal “select agents” [dangerous pathogens] from $4 million to $6 millionIn addition, the ARS proposes to spend $13 million (up from $3 million this year) for planning and design of a major poultry health laboratory in Athens, Ga. At a Feb 4 news briefing, Scott Steele of the USDA said the lab will be comparable to the agency’s livestock health laboratory in Ames, Iowa.Avian flu spendingThe budget proposal says USDA is spending an estimated $51 million on highly pathogenic avian flu and $16 million on low-pathogenic avian flu this year, for a total of $67 million. The plan calls for combining the two efforts in 2009 and providing $60 million for them.Rachel Iadicicco, an APHIS spokeswoman in Riverdale, Md., said the reduced request reflects expected savings from combining the activities and also from the completion of several one-time expenditures this year. The latter included costs for disease modeling, staff recruiting, and purchase of supplies for the National Veterinary Stockpile, she said.”We’re working to eliminate duplication of efforts,” Iadicicco said. For example, “Instead of testing one bird for low-pathogenic and another for highly pathogenic, we’ll test for both” in the same bird, she said.Iadicicco said there are no plans to reduce testing or surveillance for avian flu in poultry and wild birds or to cut back on staff.FSIS proposes new user feesThe $1.09 billion proposed for the FSIS includes $140 million from existing user fees and trust funds, leaving $952 million in expected appropriations. This year the agency estimates its spending of appropriated money at $930 million.The budget summary says the existing user fees are charged for providing overtime, holiday, and voluntary inspection services. “Separately, FSIS will submit a legislative proposal that will permit expansion of user fee charges for certain additional activities in 2009, with total collections estimated at $96 million,” the summary states. “The proposal would generate fees that will reduce appropriation needs in future years.”A total of $92 million would be collected through a licensing fee from all inspected establishments. An additional $4 million would be collected from plants that require additional inspection activities for performance failures such as retesting, recalls, or inspection activities linked to an outbreak.”Goals for foodborne pathogensThe budget summary also lists goals for reducing the prevalence of three leading foodborne pathogens—Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli O157:H7—in meat, poultry, and egg products.For Salmonella, the FSIS wants to raise the percentage of broiler chicken plants that achieve “category 1” status, meaning no more than 10% of tested product samples are contaminated. The budget summary says 71% of broiler plants achieved that in 2007; the agency wants to increase that to 80% this year and 85% in 2009.For Listeria, 0.31% of ready-to-eat product samples tested positive in 2007, the summary says. The goal is to reduce that to 0.29% in 2008 and 0.28% in 2009.The prevalence of E coli O157 in ground beef samples was up in 2007, reaching 0.23%, versus 0.16% in 2006, the summary reports. The increase came as ground beef recalls and E coli outbreaks surged. The FSIS projects a prevalence rate of 0.24% for this year but sets a goal of reducing it to 0.20% in 2009, according to the summary.See also: USDA fiscal year 2009 budget summaryhttp://www.obpa.usda.gov/budsum/FY09budsum.pdfTranscript of USDA’s Feb 4 budget briefinghttp://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_1RD?printable=true&contentidonly=true&contentid=2008/02/0031.xmllast_img read more

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O’Brien released from Ireland squad

first_img O’Brien was included in the provisional 32-man party for the games against Turkey, Italy, Costa Rica and Portugal when manager Martin O’Neill named it last week. However, he will now not join up and concentrate instead on his own fitness programme. A spokesman for the Football Association of Ireland said: “The Football Association of Ireland today confirmed that following discussions between FAI and West Ham’s medical teams, Joey O’Brien has been released from Martin O’Neill’s provisional squad to manage his off-season medical programme.” O’Brien will not be replaced in the initial party for the clashes with Turkey in Dublin on May 25, Italy at Craven Cottage on May 31, Costa Rica in Philadelphia on June 6 and Portugal in New Jersey four days later. West Ham defender Joey O’Brien has been released from the Ireland squad for their end-of-season friendlies. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Alvarez readies for last Big Ten road match of career

first_imgComing into Barry Alvarez’s final season as head football coach at Wisconsin, expectations for success were not high. The Badgers began the season unranked, and no one, even Alvarez, considered this year’s team strong enough to make a run at the Big Ten title.”I didn’t even look at a Big Ten Title,” Alvarez admitted about his pre-season expectations. “I thought we had a chance to be a nice football team. With the people we were going to play, knowing what the majority of our league had returning, I didn’t know whether we’d be good enough to contend for a championship.”Nevertheless, the Badgers are 8-1 and this Saturday’s game against conference co-leader Penn State could decide the Big Ten Champion. Despite Wisconsin’s unexpected success, critics have been quick to discount their efforts.”People have a tendency to watch a football game and they want to critique it,” Alvarez said. “Everybody finds something wrong with the game because there’s so much in our sport, unlike in any other sport; you can question every play. That gives everyone a tendency, when the game is over, to look at what went wrong. No one talks about what went right; everybody wants to know what was the problem. I think that’s just the way it is, not just here, but anyplace.”Alvarez refuses to let criticism affect him or his team, and acknowledges that his assistant coaching staff has been instrumental in keeping his team focused. While uncertainty surrounds the future as the Alvarez era ends, the assistant coaches have excelled and the head coach humbly credits them.”What my staff has accomplished to date, is by far the best job that we’ve done with the inexperience coming in,” Alvarez said. “Even with all those things, they’ve been able to stay focused, they’ve been able to put a plan together to give the guys a chance to win, they’ve been able to motivate the players to play four quarters, make adjustments on the run. It’s been really a special coaching job by the staff.”Looking to Penn State:Saturday’s game will be Alvarez’s final Big Ten road game as head coach of the Badgers. Wisconsin, the league’s best offense, averaging 39.7 points per game, will face the league’s stingiest defense in Penn State, who allows just 16.1 points per contest, in a match up that could potentially decide the Big Ten Champion. If that weren’t enough, the game will be televised nationally and Penn State’s Beaver Stadium, which holds a capacity of 107,282 fans, is expecting a record crowd.”If that doesn’t get your motor running, there’s something wrong,” Alvarez said of his players. “That’s why I try to stay away from building the game up. You don’t have to because players understand it.”Instead, Alvarez will focus on scoring on Penn State’s tough defense and stopping one of the country’s most dangerous quarterbacks, Michael Robinson.”He’s very talented,” said Alvarez of Robinson. “He can do it all and he can hurt you in a lot of different ways.Newkirk stepping up:Freshman defensive tackle Mike Newkirk has recently stepped up as a big contributor in the makeshift Badger defense. He had six tackles including a forced and recovered fumble on homecoming against Purdue.”He’s played well,” Alvarez said. “He’s active in there, he plays hard. I think he’ll continue to get better because he’s so focused and wants to be good. He’s willing to put the time and effort in to improve.”Newkirk’s seen his playing time increase drastically since the Minnesota contest when redshirt freshman Jason Chapman went down with an ankle injury. Chapman is expected to return for significant action this week.last_img read more

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Former N.C. State QB Wilson transferring to Wisconsin

first_imgAfter a lengthy stretch of rumors and speculation, Russell Wilson will officially transfer to Wisconsin, the university announced Monday.After earning his degree at North Carolina State University, Wilson is eligible to play immediately. The 5-foot-11, 201-pound quarterback was released from his scholarship at N.C. State in the spring after the coaching staff reportedly became frustrated with his indecision to commit to either football or baseball. Wilson played for the Asheville Tourists, a Colorado Rockies Class A affiliate, this summer.While the decision to transfer to Wisconsin, which reportedly came down to the Badgers and Auburn University, is not surprising, it does significantly alter the team’s plans for the fall. After two-year starter Scott Tolzien graduated in the spring, the Badgers were faced with a open spot at the quarterback position. Redshirt sophomore Jon Budmayr, despite an inconsistent performance in spring practices, appeared to be the favorite to win the spot over redshirt freshman Joe Brennan and true freshman Joel Stave.“Russell will come in and compete for the starting quarterback position,” Bielema said in a statement released by the athletic department Monday. “This is an unusual situation, especially for a program that prides itself on developing players throughout their careers, as we do here at Wisconsin. However, this is a special situation and Russell is the type of player and person that fits very well with our team.”In three years at N.C. State, Wilson threw for 8,545 yards, 76 touchdowns and 26 interceptions. Wilson earned All-Atlantic Coast Conference honors each year, and in 2010, threw for 3,563 yards, 28 touchdowns and 14 interceptions. The Richmond, Va., native is also highly regarded for his athleticism, as evidenced by his 1,089 career rushing yards and 17 rushing touchdowns.Wilson appeared on ESPN’s “College Football Live” Monday afternoon discuss his decision. Sporting a bright red tie appropriate for the new quarterback of the Badgers, Wilson explained his interest in choosing Wisconsin over both Auburn and his professional baseball career.“I think that with their coaching staff and with the players that they have there with their experience and their tradition … I’m truly excited about it,” Wilson said, adding that he knows he’s not guaranteed the starting job over Budmayr. “I never want to be told I have the starting job. …Being the competitor that I am, I believe you have to compete every single day.”last_img read more

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Louth tops shops per capita in Paddy Power dominated Ireland

first_imgShare BoyleSports signs Coventry City sponsorship August 21, 2020 StumbleUpon Flutter moves to refine merger benefits against 2020 trading realities August 27, 2020 GVC absorbs retail shocks as business recalibrates for critical H2 trading August 13, 2020 Louth, the smallest county in Ireland, has the highest concentration of betting shops in the country with 2.6 outlets per 10,000 population.As reported in the Irish Examiner, the county’s 33 betting shops puts it 50% above the national average of 1.8 bookies per 10,000 population. The other counties with the highest concentrations of betting shops are Carlow, Westmeath, Longford, and Meath.Conversely, Sligo has the lowest proportion of bookies with just eight in the county, a ratio of 1.2 shops per 10,000 population, while Cork has the third-lowest concentration of shops (1.4) despite having 78 shops, the second-highest amount behind Dublin on 259.Paddy Power has the largest presence across the country with 264 of the 862 shops equating to a 30% share. In fact, Paddy Power, Boylesports (249), and Ladbrokes (143) combined account for 72% of all bookmaker shops in the country.Only a select number of other operators have more than 10 branches, including Bar One Racing, Bruce Betting, Harrington Bookmakers, Tully Bookmakers, Track Sports, and Bambury Bookmakers.According to the Irish Bookmakers’ Association (IBA), more than 500 betting shops have closed in the past decade, which has contributed to a decline in the total stakes wagered from €3.6 billion in 2007 to €2.8 billion last year, a drop of 22%. Submit Related Articles Sharelast_img read more

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