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Spitzer calls for financial oversight

first_imgHis appearance attracted a crowd and a frenzy of media attention.But those who were anticipating a dramatic encounter involving Eliot Spitzer, the former governor of New York who resigned last year in connection with a prostitution case, came away instead with a highly nuanced argument about the need for broader financial regulations.Spitzer, J.D. ’84, appeared at Emerson Hall Thursday (Nov. 12) at the invitation of Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics to take part in the center’s Lab Lectures on the Question of Institutional Corruption. The lectures are designed to launch a five-year research project on the topic.Spitzer made a name for himself as the tough-minded attorney general of New York state, in large part for his aggressive prosecution of white-collar crime, including insurance companies and Wall Street securities firms. During his remarks, he took the audience through a lengthy and detailed discussion on the importance of government involvement in establishing transparency in the financial sector.Government has a significant role to play, argued the Harvard Law School (HLS) graduate, in establishing a critical sense of economic transparency.“Only government can enforce rules relating to integrity and transparency in the marketplace,” he said, and “only government can get these companies to tell the truth.”Spitzer outlined what he considered a host of problems with the government’s response to the nation’s economic crisis, including his concern with the notion that a company can be “too big to fail,” an argument made during the early days to help justify an expensive corporate bailout.“Too big to fail is too big not to fail. When [companies] get that big, they are inevitably going to fail, because you can’t manage them.”Corporate governance is at “the heart and soul of what has failed” the nation’s economic system over the last quarter century, said Spitzer, adding that one of the clear ways forward is to allow shareholders to elect a company’s board of directors.The subject of Spitzer’s resignation from the governorship came up only briefly, at the beginning and end of the discussion.“We hold these lectures to address serious and difficult matters,” said Lawrence Lessig, professor of law at HLS and the center’s director, who introduced Spitzer. But, he added, the attention generated by the talk meant it required additional “framing.”“No one doubts that what Gov. Spitzer did was wrong … likewise no one doubts that until the moment he was charged, at least, Gov. Spitzer inspired the very best in our profession. Whether popular or not, he worked aggressively to serve ideals bigger than himself … he was enormously successful in holding accountable those who used power to do enormous harm.”“I have invited Eliot Spitzer to contribute to these talks because of the breadth of his experience,” Lessig  said, “and, no doubt, the depth of his reflection upon where and how the problems which we study…  might be addressed.”Following his talk, Spitzer gave a simple reply to a question involving his decision to leave office: “I resigned because I thought it was the right thing to do, and the actions that led to it were wrong.”last_img read more

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Kanter honored by Good Housekeeping Magazine

first_imgRosabeth Moss Kanter, the Ernest L. Arbuckle Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and chair/director of the Interfaculty Initiative on Advanced Leadership, has been named one of the “125 women who changed our world” over the past 125 years by Good Housekeeping in the May 2010 issue (released April 13) for the magazine’s 125th anniversary.She was cited for her “ground breaking research on the toll of tokenism, work/family conflicts, fostering diversity, and the creation of successful organizations,” which “has helped women become stronger, more strategic leaders.”On April 23 she was honored with the 2010 International Leadership Award from the Association of Leadership Professionals at its annual meeting in Fort Worth, Texas.last_img read more

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Welcome, entrepreneurs

first_imgPeter Boyce ’13 wants you to be an entrepreneur. Well, maybe not you specifically, but certainly his Harvard College classmates.  A co-founder of Harvard College Venture Partners, Boyce works to advance the group’s mission to create “a more venture-friendly culture on the Harvard campus and to form a community of entrepreneurs whose collection of skills and interests would help maximize the chance of launching successful ventures.”“It’s been my passion to help students organize around entrepreneurship and pursue careers in startups,” said the Mather House resident. “So I’ve been helping as much as I can to run events, to connect students with entrepreneurs and resources here at Harvard and in the Boston community, to work more closely with the Harvard Innovation Lab (i-lab), and to bring undergrads into that space to attend startup info sessions and talks. It’s what I do.”Boyce’s vision of an entrepreneur-friendly campus took a big step forward on Friday, when he and hundreds of his classmates filed into the i-lab’s bright, open spaces for the second annual Start-Up Career Fair. An initiative of Harvard’s Office of Career Services (OCS), the fair was an opportunity for undergraduates to meet with representatives from some of the country’s most innovative and fast-growing firms, and to learn about jobs and internships.“We understand that a startup job search can be difficult for students without the infrastructure in place for hiring as with other industries,” said the i-lab’s Jodi Goldstein, who helped organize the event. “We want to assist students with their search, and to make it easier for them to identify companies they might want to work with.”Representatives of nearly 100 businesses, many of them technology firms, filled the i-lab’s first floor, offering pizza, chocolate, T-shirts, and other tchotchkes to grab the attention of undergraduates. Representatives from Tumblr, a blogging platform that allows creators to share content easily, said that they came to Harvard to recruit “technical hires.”“We wanted to come in and make our presence felt,” said Tumblr’s Ari Shahdadi, a 2008 Harvard Law School graduate. “We’re at MIT this week too, so we wanted to come here and talk to people. We’re looking for engineers and designers.”Many of the company representatives were Harvard alums themselves. Yoseph Ayele ’11 connected with Silicon Valley’s Inflection, a firm that aggregates public records and puts them online, at an OCS event last year. This year he was back on campus to sing his company’s praises and to help recruit future graduates.“Last year, we recruited 11 students from the Class of 2011,” he said. “It’s really been fun to work here. It’s a very results-driven company. Very fast-growing. We have smart people in engineering, design, marketing, business development, and operations.”OCS officials say that student interest in entrepreneurship soared in the past year. Director Robin Mount credited the new energy and enthusiasm to the opening of the i-lab and the visit of Facebook founder and former undergrad Mark Zuckerberg in the fall.“Having Mark come to campus and having the i-lab as a physical presence has inspired a lot of students to pursue a path that’s innovative,” Mount said. “Undergraduates also love to cross boundaries and work with people from Harvard Business School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. We saw students’ energy and enthusiasm and tried to capitalize on it.”Mount could easily have been speaking about Ashtynn Baltimore ’13. The Mather House resident, who already comes to the i-lab once a week for a social entrepreneurship class, said she loved being around new businesses and the people who start them.“When you’re around these people, the creative energy flows,” she said. “It gives me an opportunity to think about how I can make my idea better and add value to my teams in my different classes. There are so many different ideas flowing around here. It’s a great opportunity.”Many of Baltimore’s classmates seemed to agree, since nearly 600 undergraduates attended this year’s fair — almost three times the 2011 number. Annie Baldwin ’13 said that the startup fair and the i-lab make the College an exciting place to be for young entrepreneurs.“You get the sense that there’s a place for entrepreneurship to happen at Harvard. It’s great that they brought companies in to talk to students. It’s definitely a step in the right direction.” <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVzfC_uZkTw” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/zVzfC_uZkTw/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

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Sustainability-focused trade show promotes best practices

first_imgLight bulbs, hand-dryers, or chilled- and hot- water pumps rarely evoke dedicated interest or enthusiasm, but for Harvard’s building managers and facility leaders the energy and cost savings these technologies can deliver tend to inspire such reactions.To capture this enthusiasm, Harvard’s first-ever sustainability-focused Operations and Maintenance trade show was held on Tuesday January 21. The trade show, organized by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) Green Program, a partnership between FAS and the Harvard Office for Sustainability, and Harvard Strategic Procurement, was an opportunity to promote best practices in the field, and to unite building managers and facility leaders, who work behind the scenes to optimize building energy systems and performance.“Our goal was to bring together and promote one community, within and beyond Harvard, focused on energy efficiency and sustainability work,” said Gosia Sklodowska, senior manager of the FAS Green Program.Twenty outside vendors and contractors participated in the trade show, including NSTAR, Swegon, Grundfos, Stirling, and Dyson, showcasing everything from high-efficiency lab freezers to air handling units and sustainable insulation. NSTAR, Phillips, and GE also gave presentations to the attendees on various incentive programs and the resources available to Harvard clients.Facilities teams from across all of Harvard’s 12 Schools and departments browsed the latest cutting-edge products, remarking on the value of having a trade show to compare, and discuss the multitude of vendors and products. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Classrooms without walls

first_imgWhen Rebecca Pierre was 9, she would have breakfast each morning with local children attending a nearby summer camp. Day after day Rebecca, who had immigrated to South Boston at age 6, showed up at the camp and sat down to eat. Eventually, a senior counselor took Rebecca’s hand, brought her home, and talked to her mother about getting her enrolled.That was the beginning of Pierre’s commitment to, and passion for, the South Boston Summer Urban Program (SUP), a camp operated by the student-run Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA) out of Harvard University.Twenty-one years later, Rebecca is the director of that camp and a rising senior at Northeastern University. “SUP transformed me. It was a vital piece of my life, and a great part of my growth,” she said.Rebecca and co-director Monique Takla, a 2014 graduate of Harvard College, oversee the camp as two of the 1,500 student volunteers who help to keep PBHA running. The South Boston camp enrolls 50 campers a summer. Rebecca’s little brother is one of them.PBHA is the umbrella organization for 83 student-directed programs run by the student volunteers. The association works to meet critical local needs by providing vital resources to the community while helping to nurture public-service leaders. It’s often called “the best course at Harvard” because it provides students with knowledge and experiences that cannot be learned within classroom walls. Its programs serve close to 10,000 low-income people in Boston and Cambridge annually.SUP is a set of 10 student-run local camps, held at 12 sites. There are 11 days camps and an evening program in English as a second language for immigrant teens. The programs are staffed by more than 120 college students from various colleges and universities. The college students live in dorms on Harvard’s campus for the summer.The camps serve more than 900 low-income, at-risk youths ages 6 to 18. The camps last for seven weeks and cost only $120 per child, though no child is turned away because of an inability to pay.The programs provide a safe, supportive environment for children. They teach violence-prevention activities and serve as an avenue to stop summer learning loss. Research consistently shows that students, particularly those from low-income families, risk losing at least two months of literacy and math skills during the summer. The SUP camps work to stop those losses through activities that blend core academic areas with social and emotional development, and increased community awareness and activism.“The campers leave here with a real sense of community,” Pierre said. “A lot of what we do has a community angle. We have many different partnerships. We work with Marian Manor, a nursing facility down the road. We partner with South Boston Grows, which teaches the kids about urban gardens and healthy living, and we are constantly talking about how to make healthy life choices.”The summer programs are structured around curricular, classroom-based enrichment in the mornings and afternoons field trips around Boston.“PBHA’s SUP camps are a win-win for everyone,” said Maria Dominguez Gray, executive director of PBHA. “Campers and families benefit from enriching programming. Our junior teen counselors are engaged in meaningful employment that offers much-needed job and life skills. And the college students learn so much about themselves, about leadership, effective education, program development, and the various challenges facing urban communities. This is all learning that extends far beyond the classroom.”In addition to the camps in Boston and Cambridge neighborhoods, there are three that are subject-based. Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment serves 100 children from Dorchester, Mattapan, and South Boston. Refugee Youth Summer Enrichment serves more than 100 high school students from neighborhoods in Greater Boston. These camps target youths from more than 15 countries who have low English proficiency. The camps have been officially accepted by the Boston Public Schools as alternatives to summer school. The Native American Youth Enrichment Program serves more than 40 students and is the only urban camp in Massachusetts dedicated to meeting the academic, cultural, and social needs of local Native American youths.The Cambridge Youth Enrichment Program serves more than 160 children at three locations. Besides the camp in South Boston, there are also camps serving Chinatown (70 children), the Franklin Field and Franklin Hill housing developments in Dorchester (80 children), Mission Hill (80 children), and Roxbury (80 children). The Keylatch Summer Program serves 80 children living in housing developments in the South End and Lower Roxbury. 18Campers sang and chanted, with the guidance of Halie Olson, as they headed back to the Condon School after a field trip to Harvard Square. 1Halie Olson looks on as Jayden Melo, 7, gets a goodbye kiss from his mother, Carmen, on the first day of summer school at James F. Condon Elementary in South Boston. 13Andy Nova wanted to see the bunny’s whiskers. 11Sergio Lucero Ruiz needed lots of coaxing to even look at a bunny; a patient counselor eased him toward touching the animal. 8Northeastern student, South Boston resident, and camp co-director Rebecca Pierre (right) works with a misbehaving student on the first day. Pierre, who grew up across the street from the camp in South Boston, spent her summers attending SBOS. She lives in Harvard’s Lowell House with the other senior counselors this summer. 14Adonis Boyce stopped to greet the bunny before the class moved on. 7Counselors Sammy Cruz (center, left) and Beto Vargas play “the name game” — an orientation activity that helps students learn each other’s names. 12Students reacted to seeing a chicken. 9Shafique Holloway, 13, contributes to his classroom’s rules. 4Giovanni Ortiz watches as his son, Javier, high-fives senior counselor Halie Olson ’17 on the first day of camp. 15Julia Perez, 8, hugged a chicken at Farrington Farm. 3Jayden Melo (left) and Javier Ortiz warm up when they see that Cameryn Crowley has returned for another summer. Crowley, a camper since age 7, has moved through the ranks and now works as a junior counselor at South Boston Outreach Summer. 10Campers attend field trips like this one to the Farrington property in Lincoln, Mass., where they were introduced to animals they’d never seen before. 17Hands-on enrichment activities empower youth like Andy Nova, 8, who dared to come face-to-face with a chicken held by Jayden Melo, 7. 2Jaheim Peeple, 12, looks ambivalent on day one of camp. Run by Harvard’s Phillips Brooks House Association, the camp draws students from three public housing developments in Southie, and no child is ever turned away because of an inability to pay. 16The campers fed leaves to goats. 5Adonis Boyce (left) and Andy Nova are happy to see Cameryn Crowley, a junior counselor this year. The campers, ranging in age from 6 to 13, all meet in the cafeteria for breakfast each morning. 6Jonathan Pierre, 12, lists the rules his class has decided collaboratively to follow. Students come from one of three public housing developments in South Boston: Old Colony, Mary Ellen McCormack, and West Broadway. 19An especially exuberant Julia Perez sang as she walked along a Southie street. 20Camping can wear you out! Angelica Suazo, 9, gets a ride from camp co-director Rebecca Pierre (right).last_img read more

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Snow way this continues

first_imgAround Harvard these days, the talk among administrators and facilities managers isn’t about the last snowstorm, as punishing it was. And it isn’t about the one before that, or the one before that. It’s about the next one.Dining services personnel are talking with vendors to move up deliveries from Friday to Thursday so there’s food on hand should the next storm — forecast as relatively minor at this point — turn into another headache.Landscaping crews, the point people in campus snow-clearing operations, are widening pathways, driveways, and parking lots to make room for the next snow dump because, with winter just past the halfway mark, more is almost certainly on the way.As the next storm draws near, key officials from central administration and the Schools will be on conference calls to discuss the forecast, weather-related actions of state and local government, and key logistical concerns, such as whether the MBTA will be running commuter trains, subways, and buses. All these factors are considered in any decision of whether and how the University should respond.Executive Vice President Katie Lapp this week called the dining, operations, and other personnel who kept Harvard running through the storms “heroes,” and praised the dedication that got them to work even when noncritical staff were at home.Another 400 tons of salt are on the way, enough to get the University through the winter. Staff members, meanwhile, continue to clear snow for easier navigation across campus. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerIn addition to staff dedication, planning and coordination remain pivotal to the University’s response to unexpected disruptions, said Lapp and other Harvard administrators.David Davidson, managing director of dining services, said that, with the responsibility of feeding some 6,000 undergraduates regardless of the weather, winter planning begins in the fall. When a forecast calls for a major storm, officials contact vendors to move up deliveries so enough food is on hand should transport be disrupted.They also plan ahead to have staffers on hand, putting them up at local hotels, providing taxi vouchers, making sure parking spaces are cleared for those who have to drive in, and facilitating shift swaps for those who might have issues, such as having children at home, that prevent them from coming in.For the storm earlier this week, for example, Davidson said some 80 percent of the regular dining services staff made it to work, even though public transportation was shut down except for buses. The storm’s first night, the University put up more than 50 dining services people at nearby hotels. On the second night, 45 were there, and a handful remained through the third night.The result, he said, was three meals served a day, with just slight alterations of the menu, such as curbing cook-to-order grill operations, to free up staff.“I’m extremely proud of the group that we have. Everybody has risen to the occasion,” Davidson said.Paul Smith, associate manager of landscape services, said that staff dedication and planning are key to their efforts as well. For example, another five truckloads — 400 tons — of salt are on the way, enough to get the University through the winter. Staff members, meanwhile, continue to clear snow from the last storms to make way for whatever else is coming.That work is being done by about two dozen people on the University’s regular snow-clearing crew, augmented by 20 to 30 contracted personnel who help during big storms, Smith said.In addition to shoveling and running snow blowers, the crews use small Bobcats and the University’s two payloaders to clear snow, dumping it into 10-wheeled trucks, which transport it to a “snow dump” on Harvard-owned land in Allston, a facility also used by the city of Boston.Smith also praised his staff members’ efforts during the past storms, saying many worked double shifts and some came in sick to help keep the paths and roads clear.Though the physical well-being of students, faculty, and staff is paramount during weather emergencies, Harvard’s academic mission isn’t out of mind. Lapp said that Harvard’s Schools are individually figuring out how to make up missed academic work.At Harvard College, Dean of Undergraduate Education Jay Harris has encouraged faculty and students to find times to meet outside of normal class hours, in person or virtually via conferencing applications. Make-ups can occur by extending regular classes, meeting in the evenings, or on Fridays when there are fewer regularly scheduled classes. There is also the possibility of making up class during reading period, he wrote in an email Tuesday, but officials hope not to resort to that.Though the recent snowfall has broken several records, it hasn’t approached the region’s toughest snow year, the winter of 1995-96, when more than 100 inches fell. Smith, who was at Harvard at the time, said the snow that year was spread out over the whole season, while this year has been more intense.“There were a lot of snowstorms [that year], not three big ones back to back to back,” Smith said.Smith and others are hoping not to add yet another “to back” to that statement, but he is keeping an eye on the next disturbance, hoping there’s time to give the snow crews some rest.“They’ve been doing a lot. I can’t say enough about them,” Smith said. “The guys have to get some sleep because there’s another storm Thursday.”last_img read more

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New ministries for millennials

first_img Read Full Story Millennials hungry for deep connection are creating new spiritual communities even as they turn away from organized religion, the authors of two new studies said recently at Harvard Divinity School (HDS). As a result, secular groups are discovering the value of religious resources, and faith communities are innovating in new and unexpected ways.The remarks by HDS students Angie Thurston and Casper ter Kuile—authors of the studies “How We Gather” and “Something More”—came during the morning session of the 2016 Dean’s Leadership Forum. The event, held annually at HDS, brings thought leaders together with faculty, students, alumni, and friends of the School to explore issues in religion, ethics, and contemporary life.Thurston and ter Kuile told the crowd in Andover Hall that “How We Gather” looked at secular organizations that provided an experience of community traditionally associated with religion. These groups included Daybreaker, an early morning dance party held in seven cities on three continents around the world; the Dinner Party, which convenes young men and women over potluck dinners to talk about the recent loss of a loved one and the ways in which it continues to affect their lives; and CrossFit, a fitness community that Thurston described as “a combination of agony and laughter.”Each group has similarities to traditional religious communities, Thurston and ter Kuile said. CrossFit’s members are “evangelical” in their efforts to recruit friends to the group and also ritualize grieving with workouts named after the deceased.last_img read more

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Moments of joy beyond cancer’s shadow

first_imgBECKET, Mass. — No parent would want to send a child to Camp Kesem. But kids who go look forward to attending all year long.“It’s really special to have a connection to these other kids who have parents who have cancer,” said an 11-year-old boy nicknamed Tic Tac. “When I see the other kids, they just understand me because they’ve dealt with some of the things I’ve gone through.”Harvard’s first year as a chapter of Camp Kesem — “magic” in Hebrew, it’s pronounced keh-sem — unfolded last month in the green hills of Western Massachusetts, with a volunteer team of 19 undergrads serving as counselors for 24 children whose parents have battled cancer.Evette Ronner, founding co-director of Camp Kesem at Harvard, said she wanted to give the children, ages 6 to 13, “an experience I never had.”A camper nicknamed Speedo struts the runway in her trash-bag gown. Video still image by Kai-Jae Wang“I know what it’s like to grow up with a sick parent or without a parent because they passed away from cancer,” said the 21-year-old Harvard senior, whose father died of brain cancer when she was 6. “When a parent is sick, it’s life-altering. You go to school and you feel different —like you have a secret you’re supposed to hide. Hopefully with camp, this will relieve that burden a little bit.”Kids kept a back-to-back-to-back schedule of daily activities mixed with special events such as rope-swinging and smashing pies in counselors’ faces. Campers rotated through drama, sports, and art in the morning. In the afternoon came a new slate of activities, followed by free swim. Two nurses and a mental health counselor staffed the medical cabin, and an “empowerment ceremony,” held on the second-to-last night of camp, gave campers who were feeling particularly brave the chance to share stories and feelings.Frankie Hall, a junior concentrating in government, models trash bag designs with young campers. Photo by Jill Radsken“My dad just finished [treatment],” a girl nicknamed D.J. told a visitor later, as she made paper leis for a luau the final night of camp. “We rang the bell at the hospital.”A sense of community kicked in the moment campers and counselors arrived. Everyone got a nickname, a simple act that created an immediate bond, Ronner said, and for the kids helped make “their time at Camp Kesem very separate and special from their everyday life.”Eight-year-old Antidisestablishmentarianism, who had never been to overnight camp, ticked off everything he loved about the experience: “Swimming, dodgeball, gaga ball, just spending time with the people in my cabin.” Not to mention his first taste of campfire s’mores.The counselors “care about the kids and really follow along with the stuff we do and they do it with us and play with us and include us,” he said. “That makes me happy because some places I don’t fit in, but you can feel like, ‘I’m not alone here.’” Counselor Anna “Gibby” Gibbs recognized those feelings of loneliness and isolation. The 19-year-old junior lost her mom to breast cancer when she was 13. She recalled never knowing a time when her mother wasn’t sick, and wishing she’d had a place like Camp Kesem.“I went to grief camps,” she said. “The thought of the camps often made me anxious, which may have come from not knowing other kids in my situation or else the pressure of ‘properly’ processing my mom’s death.“I’ve learned that not only does life go on, but that it also continues to be full of fun and joy. Camp Kesem is evidence of that. It’s helpful seeing that it can get better and it can get worse, and it’s OK.”Campers model their trash bag designs after a fashion show for their fellow campers. Video still image by Kai-Jae WangGrassroots fundraising — coffee drives and singing camp songs at the Boston Marathon and the Head of the Charles — provided Camp Kesem at Harvard the $30,000 it needed to pay for the first-year group. Students completed 40 hours of training to prepare for the campers, who hailed from New England and Texas.Lily Wilkinson, a senior concentrating in human developmental and regenerative biology who first heard about the camp from family in her home state of Nebraska, said the week was “all I wanted and more to see this family develop.” She shared an anecdote from a camper nicknamed Jimmy Butler.“He asked when he could sign up for the next camp,” she said. When counselor Alexander Munoz answered, “Your parents will get an email; they should be able to sign up sometime after you get back home,” Butler replied, “No, I need to sign up right now.”Frankie “Beaker” Hill ’19 could relate to that sense of urgency. Said the 20-year-old from New Era, Mich., who served as unofficial campfire song leader: “When I look in the eyes of these campers, it’s a lot of faces I’ve seen before. When you come to a camp like this where you meet people who instantly know, that’s really valuable.” What I did on my Summer Explorations Ed Portal cross between camp and summer school lets kids learn by having fun Relatedlast_img read more

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Advanced Leadership Initiative takes deep look at climate change

first_img Read Full Story With speakers ranging from an environmental activist to a former Secretary of the U.S. Navy, the Advanced Leadership Initiative’s (ALI) Climate Change Deep Dive presented a multi-faceted look at the causes, consequences, and potential solutions for climate change.ALI Faculty Co-Chair Forest Reinhardt of Harvard Business School (HBS) led the 2018 Deep Dive, a two-day conference bringing together speakers from around Harvard University to share their collective knowledge with ALI Fellows.ALI’s Deep Dive Sessions highlight one major global or community challenge where its Fellows might fill a gap. Deep Dives include readings, outside experts, often faculty from relevant Harvard programs, and a focus on problem-solving and practical applications of research.ALI Fellows also contribute ideas based on their experience and knowledge to find immediate solutions for these challenges.About ALILaunched in 2009, ALI is a third stage in higher education designed to prepare experienced leaders to take on new challenges in the social sector.This year, ALI welcomed its 10th cohort of Fellows, bringing extensive experience in law, medicine, technology, finance, manufacturing, government, social enterprise, and other sectors to the program.The group includes 12 international Fellows, a former member of Congress, a former head of state, as well as former CEOs and C-suite executives from distinguished private sector and nonprofit organizations.The Climate Change Deep DiveThe first day of the 2018 Climate Change Deep Dive focused on scientific aspects of climate change and several options for mitigation. Speakers on the first day in­cluded Professor Peter Huybers of Harvard’s John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Professor Robert Stavins of the Harvard Kennedy School, Joseph Goffman of the Harvard Law School, and Professors Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Joseph Lassiter, and Forest Reinhard of HBS.The second day of the Deep Dive presented options for climate change adaptation and mitigation and helped ALI Fellows synthesize the content of the previous sessions. Speakers on the second day of the Deep Dive were Secretary Ray Mabus of the US Navy, Professor John Macomber (HBS), Professor James Engell of Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Professor Amy Edmondson (HBS), and writer Terry Tempest Wil­liams of Harvard Divinity School.Overall, the Climate Change Deep Dive allowed Fellows to take an ana­lytical and ethical look at some of the world’s most pressing environmen­tal issues.Cross-Sector SolutionsAt the close of the Deep Dive, the Fellows had a chance to consolidate their thinking and developed some key takeaways. Among their potential solutions, Fellows suggested firms should reduce emissions, alter operations, and have transpar­ency toward sustainability goals.They also highlighted the role of government, which should develop clear standards, simplify and priori­tize regulation, and institute carbon pricing.Finally, they noted the role of the media and the press to raise awareness about the problems of climate change and communicate the stories of affected individuals.To learn more about the Deep Dive, read ALI’s complete 2018 Climate Change Deep Dive Report.last_img read more

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Ben Platt named Man of the Year

first_img Related Ben Platt’s Grammy, Tony, and Emmy awards will be making room for a Pudding Pot on Friday after he receives the Hasty Pudding Theatricals’ Man of the Year award.Platt, 26, perhaps best known for his Tony-winning turn in “Dear Evan Hansen,” is the youngest man  to receive the Pudding Pot in Hasty Pudding’s 54-year history.“We’re thrilled to honor Ben Platt as our 54th Man of the Year because of the incredible impact he has had on Broadway and in Hollywood at such a young age,” said Hasty co-producer Natalie Needle. “Ben has had a remarkable career as an actor and musician. We are also avid musical theater fans, so we are very excited for him to watch our production,” added co-producer Samantha Meade.The Hasty Pudding Theatricals’ Man and Woman of the Year Awards are presented annually to performers who have made lasting and impressive contributions to the world of entertainment. The Man of the Year award was established in 1967. Its past recipients include, among others, Clint Eastwood, Tom Hanks, Robert De Niro, Harrison Ford, Justin Timberlake, Robert Downey Jr., Joseph Gordon-Levitt, and Robin Williams.Platt is currently filming season two of “The Politician,” a popular Netflix series by Ryan Murphy on which Platt is the executive producer. Season one earned Platt a Golden Globe nomination for best lead actor in a comedy. He will soon be starring alongside Beanie Feldstein in the film adaption of the Stephen Sondheim musical “Merrily We Roll Along,” directed by Richard Linklater.Platt’s 2019 debut album, “Sing to Me Instead,” along with a new single, “Rain,” were performed to a sold-out crowd in Radio City Music Hall. The concert was filmed for a Netflix special being released this spring.On the big screen, Platt is known for his role as Benji Applebaum in Universal Pictures’ franchise “Pitch Perfect” and “Pitch Perfect 2.” (This year’s Woman of the Year, Elizabeth Banks, made her directorial film debut with “Pitch Perfect 2.”) Platt also starred in “Ricki and the Flash” alongside Meryl Streep. His newest film, “Broken Diamonds,” has a 2020 release date.Platt made his Broadway debut as Elder Cunningham in the Broadway production of “The Book of Mormon.”  But it was his role as the title character in “Dear Evan Hansen” that won him the 2017 Tony award for best leading actor. He also won the Drama League Award for distinguished performance . “Dear Evan Hansen” also won the Tony for best musical, and the cast recording took home the Grammy for best musical theater album.The Man of the Year festivities, presented by Related and Equinox/SoulCycle, will be held Friday. The Hasty Pudding Theatricals will host a celebratory roast for Platt and present him with his Pudding Pot at Farkas Hall, the Pudding’s historic home in Harvard Square since 1888. A press conference will follow the roast at 8:30 p.m. The troupe will perform “Mean Ghouls,” its second production featuring both men and women in the cast.To purchase tickets to the Hasty Pudding Theatricals’ 172nd production, “Mean Ghouls,” contact the box office at 617-495-5205, email tickets@hastypudding.org, or order online at www.hastypudding.org/buy-tickets. The show will be performed at Farkas Hall at 12 Holyoke St. from Feb. 7-March 8. The company then travels to New York to perform at the Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College on March 13 and 14, followed by performances on March 18-20 at Hamilton City Hall in Bermuda. Hasty Pudding’s Woman of the Year honored with tour, parade through the Squarecenter_img Elizabeth Banks is roasted, toastedlast_img read more

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