Month: August 2019

Clipon wind and solar charger powers your mobile devices

Clipon wind and solar charger powers your mobile devices

first_img Zero-carbon electric transport is already in reach for small islands The HYmini is a handheld universal charger that captures wind power, solar power, and power from electrical outlets to charge a variety of portable devices. Explore further Although the charger, called HYmini, should be initially charged via an electrical wall outlet (which takes about 4 hours), it can be topped off away from home in windy or sunny conditions. With enough solar batteries, it’s possible to fully charge the HYmini without any electrical power. Wind power is intended solely for supplemental charging, though. When fully charged, HYmini’s 5V/1A lithium ion battery can provide power for cell phones, PDAs, MP3 players, iPods, and even digital cameras. Gadgets are hooked up to the charger via a USB cable and various adapters that are included in the package. miniWIZ claims the charger´s battery can be recharged up to 500 times, providing at least 1000mA/h of storage capacity that can be transferred to mobile devices. HYmini’s built-in wind charger consists of a micro wind power generator activated by a tiny fan. At wind speeds between 9 and 40 mph, the turbine can provide up to 1W of power with a 65 mA capacity. A green LED lights up when charging, which can also be used as a night light. The input current depends on the wind speed: in tests, 20 minutes of 19-mph winds could generate enough charge to power an MP3 player for 40 minutes, a cell phone for 4 minutes, or a digital camera for 20 pictures. The company suggests that the charger would be ideal when biking, skiing, or participating in similar high-speed activities, although it caps off at 40 mph for safety reasons. The charger is moisture-proof, and the turbine is made of soft PVC that breaks on impact to avoid injury. Replacement turbines can be purchased online.Besides electrical and wind, the HYmini can also be charged by the sun. The package comes with four optional 6-inch solar miniSOLAR panels, which can be linked together to the charger to provide up to 5V. When charging, a side indicator turns red to note that sunlight is being converted into electricity and stored in the device´s internal battery.The HYmini is available starting at USD $50 in black, white, and green. The miniSOLAR panels are $25 each, and the site also provides data on the average percentage of sunlight and wind speeds for various US cities. More information: http://www.hymini.comvia: Gizmag Citation: Clip-on wind and solar charger powers your mobile devices (2008, April 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-04-clip-on-solar-charger-powers-mobile.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. You’re riding your bike, the wind’s in your hair – and now it can be in your miniature wind and solar charger clipped to your handlebars or upper arm. A company called miniWIZ has developed a handheld universal charger that captures wind power, solar power, and power from electrical outlets to charge a variety of portable devices. last_img read more

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Spacetime May Have Fractal Properties on a Quantum Scale

Spacetime May Have Fractal Properties on a Quantum Scale

first_img“In simple words, the relation between quantum groups and noncommutative geometry is as follows,” he explained. “Classically, we know that certain spaces are invariant under the action of some classical groups; for example, Euclidean space is invariant under rotations and translations. A quantum group is a deformation of a given classical group, and is such that no classical space can have it as a symmetry group. The invariant space has to be as well a deformation of a classical space, a deformation that makes it noncommutative. No relation of all this to fractals is known, but in my work I’ve found that they do have a common property, that is, a non-integer dimension (at some scale).”Compared to a Euclidean sphere, a quantum sphere’s curvature and uncertainty make it a noncommutative space. When calculating the spectral dimension of the quantum sphere, Benedetti found that it closely resembles a standard sphere on large scales; however, as the scale decreases, the dimensions of the quantum sphere deviate and go down to zero. He describes this phenomenon as a signature of the fuzziness, or uncertainty, of the quantum sphere, and also as resulting from fractal behavior at small scales.In the second kind of space, k-Minkowski spacetime, the dimensions also deviate from the constant behavior of classical Minkowski spacetime. While the latter always has four dimensions, independent of the scale, the number of dimensions in the quantum version decreases to three as a function of the scale. In both k-Minkowski spacetime and the quantum sphere, the dimensionality becomes non-integral, which is a typical signature of fractal geometry.Benedetti’s results match previous approaches to quantum gravity, which also point to the emergence of a ground-scale spacetime with fractal properties. Together, these studies may help scientists understand the unique Planck scale properties of spacetime, and possibly tie in to a quantum theory of gravity. For instance, as Benedetti explains, the fractal nature of quantum spacetime might enable gravity to cure its own ultraviolet behavior by dimensional reduction. “The main problem with gravity is that apparently it cannot be quantized as other field theories; in jargon it is said to be non-renormalizable,” he said. “This problem is specific to four-dimensional spacetime. If spacetime had only two dimensions, then quantum gravity would be much simpler and treatable. The problem with a two-dimensional theory is that it is unphysical, as we see four dimensions at our scales. Things can be solved combining four and two dimensions at different scales. That is, if gravity itself provides a mechanism by which the dimension of spacetime depends on the scale at which we probe it (four at our and larger scales and two at very short scales), then we could have a physical theory (compatible with observations) that is free of quantum (short scale) troubles.”More information: Benedetti, Dario. “Fractal Properties of Quantum Spacetime.” Physical Review Letters 102, 111303 (2009).Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Spacetime May Have Fractal Properties on a Quantum Scale (2009, March 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-03-spacetime-fractal-properties-quantum-scale.html As if extra dimensions weren’t strange enough, new research has probed an even more mind-bending possibility: that spacetime has dimensions that change depending on the scale, and the dimensions could have fractal properties on small scales. In a recent study, Dario Benedetti, a physicist at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, has investigated two possible examples of spacetime with scale-dependent dimensions deviating from classical values at short scales. More than being just an interesting idea, this phenomenon might provide insight into a quantum theory of relativity, which also has been suggested to have scale-dependent dimensions. Benedetti’s study is published in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.“It is an old idea in quantum gravity that at short scales spacetime might appear foamy, fuzzy, fractal or similar,” Benedetti told PhysOrg.com. “In my work, I suggest that quantum groups are a valid candidate for the description of such a quantum spacetime. Furthermore, computing the spectral dimension, I provide for the first time a link between quantum groups/noncommutative geometries and apparently unrelated approaches to quantum gravity, such as Causal Dynamical Triangulations and Exact Renormalization Group. And establishing links between different topics is often one of the best ways we have to understand such topics.”In his study, Benedetti explains that a spacetime with quantum group symmetry has in general a scale-dependent dimension. Unlike classical groups, which act on commutative spaces, quantum groups act on nocommutative spaces (e.g. where xy doesn’t equal yx), which emerges through their unique curvature and quantum uncertainty. Here, Benedetti considers two types of spacetime with quantum group symmetry – a quantum sphere and k-Minkowski spacetime – and calculates their dimensions. In both spaces, the dimensions have fractal properties at small scales, and only reach classical values at large scales. Generally Speaking: A Primer on General Relativity As scale decreases, the number of dimensions of k-Minkowski spacetime (red line), which is an example of a space with quantum group symmetry, decreases from four to three. In contrast, classical Minkowski spacetime (blue line) is four-dimensional on all scales. This finding suggests that quantum groups are a valid candidate for the description of a quantum spacetime, and may have connections with a theory of quantum gravity. Image credit: Dario Benedetti.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — Usually, we think of spacetime as being four-dimensional, with three dimensions of space and one dimension of time. However, this Euclidean perspective is just one of many possible multi-dimensional varieties of spacetime. For instance, string theory predicts the existence of extra dimensions – six, seven, even 20 or more. As physicists often explain, it’s impossible to visualize these extra dimensions; they exist primarily to satisfy mathematical equations.last_img read more

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Researchers discover nanocrystals able to squeeze through nanotubes without changing

Researchers discover nanocrystals able to squeeze through nanotubes without changing

first_img(Phys.org) —Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered that a nanocrystal moving through a nanotube due to an electric charge is able to pass through a portion of the nanotube that is smaller in diameter than the crystal, without melting or undergoing compression. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team describes how they observed an iron nanocrystal move through a narrow channel in a nanotube without its properties being changed in the process. Journal information: Physical Review Letters Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Scientists have known for some time that if metal crystals are inserted into a nanotube, then the crystals will move through the tube if an electric current is applied. The speed and direction of the crystals can be controlled by modifying the amount and direction of the current. However, that was always done with uniform width nanotubes. In this new effort, the researchers created a nanotube that had a diameter of 20 nm for most of its length—in its middle section however, they caused the nanotube to constrict to a diameter of just 5 nm. The assumption was that when an electric charge was applied to an iron nanocrystal introduced into the nanotube, it would be stopped-up by the constriction until either the crystal melted due to the heat of the current applied, or was squished as it was forced through the smaller space. Instead, the researchers found, by watching through an electron microscope, that the crystal was able to move through the constriction before either occurred, without undergoing any changes at all. Instead, it simply rearranged itself. They noted also that the crystal moved through the constriction at the same speed, regardless of its length, so long as the current remained stable.The researchers aren’t sure exactly how the crystal was able to move through the constriction, but theorize that atoms on the back side of the crystal structure somehow migrated, or diffused to the front—over and over again until the crystal had, in essence, re-formed itself on the other side of the blockage. The discovery of this phenomenon could lead to new ways to synthesize metal crystals or to increase their purity. A transmission electron micrograph image of an iron nanocrystal inside a carbon nanotube and the same section after a current has been applied, causing the iron nanoparticle to squeeze into the adjacent constriction. Credit: S. Coh et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2013)center_img Citation: Researchers discover nanocrystals able to squeeze through nanotubes without changing (2013, May 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-05-nanocrystals-nanotubes.html © 2013 Phys.org Simulation shows it’s possible to move H2O@C60 using electrical charge More information: Surface Atom Motion to Move Iron Nanocrystals through Constrictions in Carbon Nanotubes under the Action of an Electric Current, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 185901 (2013) prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v110/i18/e185901AbstractUnder the application of electrical currents, metal nanocrystals inside carbon nanotubes can be bodily transported. We examine experimentally and theoretically how an iron nanocrystal can pass through a constriction in the carbon nanotube with a smaller cross-sectional area than the nanocrystal itself. Remarkably, through in situ transmission electron imaging and diffraction, we find that, while passing through a constriction, the nanocrystal remains largely solid and crystalline and the carbon nanotube is unaffected. We account for this behavior by a pattern of iron atom motion and rearrangement on the surface of the nanocrystal. The nanocrystal motion can be described with a model whose parameters are nearly independent of the nanocrystal length, area, temperature, and electromigration force magnitude. We predict that metal nanocrystals can move through complex geometries and constrictions, with implications for both nanomechanics and tunable synthesis of metal nanoparticles.last_img read more

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Two different crystals can be described by the same mathematical rules

Two different crystals can be described by the same mathematical rules

first_img Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—Scientists have found that an intricately beautiful yet poorly understood type of crystal found in soap bubbles follows the same mathematical rules as a much better understood type of crystal called martensite. Due to its extreme hardness, martensite has been used since the Iron Age to make swords and horseshoes. The soap-bubble crystals, on the other hand, which are called smectic liquid crystals (where “smectic” is derived from the Greek word for “soap”), have turned out to be what the scientists describe as “the world’s weirdest martensite.” While all crystals are known for their highly ordered, aesthetically appealing structure, smectic liquid crystals stand out because their microstructure is particularly unusual. Full of beautiful patterns of ellipses and hyperbolas that bend, rotate, and curve around each other, the microstructure of smectic liquid crystals has fascinated researchers since they first turned their microscopes upon them over a century ago. Martensite microstructure, on the other hand, is characterized by a simpler striped pattern.Discovering the connection between the two seemingly different types of crystals required the meeting of two experts in these areas: Randall Kamien, a physicist at the University of Pennsylvania who studies smectic liquid crystals, and Cornell University physicist James Sethna, who specializes in martensites.In a new paper published in Physical Review Letters, Kamien, Sethna, and their coauthors have modified the mathematical theory of martensites so that it also explains the unusual features of smectic microstructure. It turns out that the rules that describe how all of the ellipses and hyperbolas fill 3D space in the smectic microstructure are very similar to the rules that describe the relatively simpler patterns in martensitic crystals.”I’m excited because a weird, anomalous scientific backwater with beautiful phenomena has now been fit into a standard framework,” Sethna told Phys.org. “The mathematically beautiful theory of martensites, which until now mostly predicted layered structures, now has an amazingly rich example, smectic liquid crystals.”The resulting new theory of smectic microstructure captures observations made as far back as 1922, when the French mineralogist Georges Friedel discovered that smectic layers bend in a very specific way, into so-called “cyclides of Dupin.” These layers of curved surfaces have centers of curvature that all lie along another single curve. As the curved surfaces somewhat resemble flower petals curving around the center of a flower, the cyclides of Dupin give the crystals a “flower texture.” All of this highly ordered curvature also enables the complex surfaces to pack together very tightly. (Left) Simulations of smectic liquid crystals and (right) experimental martensites, which have a characteristic striped pattern. Small images of smectic liquid crystals in the middle show close-ups of ellipses and hyperbolas, which form curved patterns known as cyclides of Dupin. The microstructure also exhibits Apollonian packing, where the small gaps between ellipses are filled with smaller and smaller ellipses. The concentric circles can be described by the same mathematics used to describe light cones in special relativity. Credit for smectic liquid crystals: Liarte, et al. ©2016 American Physical Society. Credit for martensites: Chu and James. Besides the connection between the two crystals, there is another mathematical connection in this work, which is that to special relativity. In smectic liquid crystals, the cyclides of Dupin form concentric circles of increasing size that form cones which look like the “light cones” in special relativity. Light cones represent the path of light as it broadens in all directions, like light emerging from a flashlight. Since the crystal and light models are geometrically identical, the same math used in special relativity, such as manipulating the shapes with Lorentz transformations, can be used to describe these crystals.”The links to Einstein’s relativity are both real and theoretically cool,” Sethna said.Although the new theory of smectic liquid crystals and martensites describes many characteristics of both crystals, questions still remain regarding some of the unique geometrical features, and the researchers hope to continue to investigate these tiny structures in future work.”We’re hoping to extend our tools to analyze experimental smectic microstructures,” Sethna said. “There are some new imaging methods that should allow the layer orientations to be understood in three dimensions, and we should be able to use our numerical methods to figure out how the cyclides of Dupin (each with an ellipse and a hyperbola) fit together to fill the volume, adapt to changing boundary conditions, and evolve as the smectic flows.” More information: Danilo B. Liarte, et al. “Weirdest Martensite: Smectic Liquid Crystal Microstructure and Weyl-Poincaré Invariance.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.147802 Another characteristic that results in tight packing in the smectic microstructure is called “Apollonian packing.” Since there are small gaps between the ellipses, these regions are filled with smaller ellipses, and the gaps between them are likewise filled with even smaller ellipses, all the way down to the molecular scale. Both the Apollonian packing and cyclides of Dupin occur for the same reason: they offer the most energetically favorable arrangement for this crystal. Citation: Two different crystals can be described by the same mathematical rules (2016, April 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-04-crystals-mathematical.html © 2016 Phys.org Simulations of the “topography” of smectic liquid crystals. The concentric circles on the bottom form “light cones” analogous to those in special relativity. Credit: Liarte, et al. ©2016 American Physical Society ‘Weirdest martensite’: Century-old smectic riddle finally solved Journal information: Physical Review Letterslast_img read more

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Model reveals best approach to get people to conserve water in different

Model reveals best approach to get people to conserve water in different

first_img Kansas well owners, non-well owners have different watering routines during droughts Credit: CC0 Public Domain © 2017 Phys.org Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in Australia has developed a model that sheds light on the social factors involved in getting users to cooperate on water conservation efforts. In their paper published in the journal Nature Human Behavior, the group describes the factors they used to build their model and what it revealed.center_img More information: Juan Carlos Castilla-Rho et al. Social tipping points in global groundwater management, Nature Human Behaviour (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41562-017-0181-7AbstractGroundwater is critical to global food security, environmental flows, and millions of rural livelihoods in the face of climate change. Although a third of Earth’s largest groundwater basins are being depleted by irrigated agriculture, little is known about the conditions that lead resource users to comply with conservation policies. Here we developed an agent-based model of irrigated agriculture rooted in principles of cooperation and collective action and grounded on the World Values Survey Wave 6 (n = 90,350). Simulations of three major aquifer systems facing unsustainable demands reveal tipping points where social norms towards groundwater conservation shift abruptly with small changes in cultural values and monitoring and enforcement provisions. These tipping points are amplified by group size and best invoked by engaging a minority of rule followers. Overall, we present a powerful tool for evaluating the contingency of regulatory compliance upon cultural, socioeconomic, institutional and physical conditions, and its susceptibility to change beyond thresholds. Managing these thresholds may help to avoid unsustainable groundwater development, reduce enforcement costs, better account for cultural diversity in transboundary aquifer management and increase community resilience to changes in regional climate. Although we focus on groundwater, our methods and findings apply broadly to other resource management issues. Throughout history, humans have been pulling water from rivers, lakes and streams to drink and to grow crops. More recently, humans have found it possible to access underground sources and have tapped into those, as well. Historically, there has been enough water to suit needs, but most scientists agree that is about to change. Underground water reservoirs such as aquifers are being depleted, and will soon run dry if something does not change. In this new effort, the researchers looked at the social factors involved when people in areas where water is likely to become scarce are pressed to cooperate in water conservation efforts.To create their model, the researchers chose three real-world locations that are believed to be at risk: the Murray–Darling Basin in Australia, the Punjab on the India/Pakistani border and California’s Central Valley in the U.S. They analyzed historical and physical data from all three regions, along with information from sources describing measures previously taken to coax such water users to conserve water, such as the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act in California. The group also added factors that account for social norms using cultural theory (grid–group or plural rationality)—all to answer three basic questions. The first involved revealing the relationship between those seeking to monitor water usage and their enforcement abilities, and the degree to which farmers and other water consumers complied. The second sought to better understand how social norms are involved in resource conservation efforts; the third was to find out which of the three regions under study was most likely to succeed in their efforts.The model showed that punishing water abusers in cooperative cultures such as in the Punjab was reasonably effective, whereas in places like the U.S. and Australia, the best approach appeared to involve inserting cooperative role models into a region who could persuade others to adopt conservation efforts. Journal information: Nature Human Behaviour Citation: Model reveals best approach to get people to conserve water in different areas (2017, August 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-08-reveals-approach-people-areas.htmllast_img read more

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TIC236 protein found to link outer and inner membranes of chloroplast envelope

TIC236 protein found to link outer and inner membranes of chloroplast envelope

first_imgA team of researchers with the Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, in Taipei, has discovered a protein called TIC236 that serves as a link between the outer and inner membranes of the chloroplast envelope in plant cells. In their paper published in the journal Nature, they describe their study of the means by which proteins are imported into chloroplasts and what they learned. Danny Schnell with Michigan State University has written a News and Views piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue. More information: Yih-Lin Chen et al. TIC236 links the outer and inner membrane translocons of the chloroplast, Nature (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-018-0713-y © 2018 Science X Network Explore further Journal information: Nature Credit: CC0 Public Domaincenter_img Heredity matters: Ancestral protease functions as protein import motor in chloroplasts Chloroplasts are a type of organelle inside plant cells—they are involved in metabolic activities, including assisting with the photosynthetic process. In this new effort, the researchers have isolated one of the proteins involved in transporting other proteins from the cytoplasm, where they are made, into a chloroplast. Chloroplasts have two membranes called TOC and TIC that proteins must pass through in order to do their work.In their effort, the researchers sought to find the answers to two major questions: How do protein complexes that are known to exist at the boundaries of the membranes help transport other proteins through the membranes? And how did the TOC/TIC system evolve?In taking a close look at chloroplasts, the researchers discovered that there was a previously unidentified protein located at the TIC—they named it TIC236. They found that TIC236 served as a link between the TOC and TIC. Normally, it is fixed to and interacts with the inner membrane, but part of it also extends into the area between the TIC and the TOC, where it interacts with another protein that does roughly the same job for the TOC, called TOC75. Thus, the two proteins serve as intermediaries.To answer their second question, the researchers suggest that their discovery of TIC236 adds credence to theories that propose that plants came into existence when a bacterium was consumed by a host cell, leading eventually to the development of chloroplasts. They offer a side-by-side comparison of a plant and bacterium cell, showing the similarities, which now includes TIC236. Citation: TIC236 protein found to link outer and inner membranes of chloroplast envelope (2018, November 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-tic236-protein-link-outer-membranes.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Study of foot posture shows association between foot type and body size

Study of foot posture shows association between foot type and body size

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A quartet of researchers from the University of Tokyo in Japan and the University of Reading in the U.K. has found an association between the evolution of foot posture and body size in mammals. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Tai Kubo, Manabu Sakamoto, Andrew Meade and Chris Venditti describe their study of foot posture in a large variety of extant mammal species and their subsequent development of a phylogenetic tree. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Explore further The researchers note that all modern mammals can be classified by one of three types of foot posture: flat-footed, tiptoed and hooved. Flat-footed creatures include species like humans and mice. Tiptoed species include animals such as dogs and cats and hooved species include creatures such as horses and deer. In this new effort, the researchers began by classifying 880 species of extant mammals by their respective foot-posture type. They note that most species were easy to classify, while some, such as elephants (flat-footed) and rhinos (tiptoed) were not.Once the team completed the classifications, they plotted the species under study on a family tree that included all mammalian species—they also added some extinct species with known foot types. They were able to see associations in the tree between species based on foot type. In so doing, they found that foot type could be generally associated with body size. Animals with hooves, for example, tended to be large. They also found that tiptoed animals were, on average, twice as big as flat-footed animals, though there were some notable exceptions. People are generally bigger than dogs and housecats, for example. They also found that hooved animals were actually a lot bigger on average than tiptoed animals—57 times as big. The researchers noted that the association between foot type and size posed the question of which came first—did the development of hooves allow certain species to grow bigger, or did hooves come about because larger animals needed them?The researchers also used their tree to analyze historical specimens and found evidence that suggested the first mammals to evolve likely belonged to the flat-footed category. More information: Tai Kubo et al. Transitions between foot postures are associated with elevated rates of body size evolution in mammals, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2019). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1814329116center_img Citation: Study of foot posture shows association between foot type and body size evolution in mammals (2019, January 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-foot-posture-association-body-size.html Credit: CC0 Public Domain Skull scans tell tale of how world’s first dogs caught their prey © 2019 Science X Networklast_img read more

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Santa comes to town

Santa comes to town

first_imgWinters have set in Delhi and celebrations have begun. It is time to feel the warmth of love and celebration in the air. In a bid to boost tourism in the city, Delhi Tourism will be organizing Winter Carnival and mark the celebration on the season. The festival will be from December 20 to 31 at Dilli Haat INA. The occasion of Christmas spreads joy and laughter and this celebration would heartily bid farewell to 2014 and welcome the new year in great enthusiasm. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’An exhibition of ACASH under the Ministry of Textiles-Development Commissioner for Handlooms, which had started on December 16 will be continuing till December 31 at the same venue and it is be an additional attraction for masses.  This taana-baana exhibition by ACASH includes  sareers and suits of exclusive variety. The exhibition would include attire from places like Kantha, Patola, Chanderi, Banaras, North East, Kangivaram and Gujarat. Shawls from J&K, Himachal Pradesh and Gujarat would be a fashionable attraction for visitors.A unique Christmas bazaar would be the main attraction and Santa Claus would be moving around the venue distributing candies to charm the little ones. Delhi Bible Fellowship would conduct singing of carols, while people dressed as clowns would be entertaining the visitors.last_img read more

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Through the life lens

Through the life lens

first_imgFinal year’s master’s students of Convergent Journalism, Jamia Millia Islamia screened their documentaries at the second Ainaa Documentary Film Festival. The festival marks the showcasing of their documentaries that was made during their final year of the course under the guidance of mentors and the Mass Communication Research Centre (MCRC) faculty of Jamia Millia Islamia.Five documentaries from the duration of five minutes to twenty minutes were screened at the spacious M A Ansari Auditorium that was brimming with students, friends, family and alumnus of the course. Teachers and students from other colleges too joined in. The screening was followed by a question answer session where audience asked questions to the directors and team involved in the film making. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The theme of the documentaries covered a range of subjects.  The first documentary was on Rohingya Muslims from Burma who have migrated to India in search of safer shelter. The documentary follows Afsa and her family who fled from Burma following violence and it shows their story of survival in a different land. Directed by Muhammad Faisal K, and titled I can’t be mad at Allah, the film talks about the spirit of resilience and faith in God that these refugees show even when facing terrible times.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixA fun take on dreams, those achieved and those that died in the heart somehow, Malvika Saini’s documentary is aptly called Delhi Dreams. The documentary features many Delhiites’ who talk about what their dreams are/were, what adds music and fun to the story is how each respondent has a xylophone and can create music of their own while recalling their dream. The audience was in splits while watching this very short documentary.Memories of an Autumn was a documentary on Sikh riots of 1984 narrated through the memories. The film talks about memories of people who survived the riots and were witnesses, those who have heard about the riots and are old enough to understand what happened, reflecting selective memory and finally small children who know of the riots like a fable, learnt by heart even when the story is completely flawed, false memory. Three generations tell what they knew of the riots. Many questions followed the screening where the audience asked many question to director Sanat Sinah and his team. Aaqib Raza Khan’s Desi Angrezi was a fun take on the numerous ‘Spoken English’ courses that has sprouted in the country. It follows two characters who are struggling to learn and understand the language and master good English pronunciation so that they can succeed in achieving their dreams. Another film that drew many eyeballs was Sailabnama by Sheikh Saaliq and Qazi Zaid that traced volunteers during their rescue/aid operations during the recent floods in Kashmir. While the filmmakers focused on the feeling of brotherhood the Kashmir floods had invoked in the locals, the discussion after the film discussed the role of the Indian army in the rescue operations. They were numerous questions asked and answered. The documenatries were produced by  the course co-ordinator Richa Pant and Simon Chamber, mentor for the students and an independent documenatry filmmaker from London.last_img read more

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Bonhams New York auctions rare items to help rebuild Nepal

Bonhams New York auctions rare items to help rebuild Nepal

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A 15th century Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ sculpture of Buddhist deity Chakrasamvara and another figure of Buddhist guru Gayadhara besides a range of rare bronzes, thangkas, stone and miniatures figure in an upcoming auction by Bonhams. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix 

Part of the proceeds of the Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art auction scheduled to be held in New York on September 14, with total estimates of $ 2 million — $ 3 million will be donated to charities engaged in relief and rebuilding operations in the earthquake affected Nepal, auctioneers said in a statement. read more

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CID nabs drug peddler with 500 gm heroin at Raghunathganj

CID nabs drug peddler with 500 gm heroin at Raghunathganj

first_imgKolkata: CID officers nabbed a drug peddler, identified as Mohammad Nurshed Ali alias Bishu, with 500grams of heroin on Wednesday at Raghunathganj. According to the investigators, he was being used as a carrier. However, the main culprit behind the operation is yet to be located. Sources informed that the CID officials in North Bengal had been receiving inputs regarding drug peddling since the last few days. Upon probing the matter, investigators came to know that someone was trying to smuggle heroin through Raghunathganj. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeOn Wednesday, investigators received a tip about Ali. Without wasting any time, CID officials raided Saidapur Bazar at Raghunathganj in the morning and apprehended Ali red-handed. A packet full of heroin weighing about 500 grams was recovered from him. Ali was brought to the Raghunathganj police station immediately. Later, a specific case was initiated against Ali at the police station under the Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (NDPS) Act.last_img read more

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Amid festive rush nonagenarian Durga shows a picture of abject neglect

Amid festive rush nonagenarian Durga shows a picture of abject neglect

first_imgKolkata: While the people of Bengal are preparing to worship Maa Durga, a 90-year-old mother has been left alone by her children in Burdwan. According to locals, Durgarani Nag, a resident of Galsi in Burdwan, had been living without sufficient food and proper garments for almost a year.Durgarani’s neighbours alleged that her younger son Asutosh had left the house beside Galsi station without paying the electricity bill for quite a long period. He bought a new house near Galsi Market. Since then, he has not tried to know how she was spending her days. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeSources informed that Durgarani’s husband Sudhir Kumar Nag passed away a few years ago. Their elder son Jivan Kumar stays out of Bengal for his profession. Her second son Bipadtaran works at a shop. As his earning is not enough, he is not capable of taking Durgarani’s responsibilities. Her next son Asutosh, who promised to look after her but does not, is a headmaster of a school in Galsi and her daughter Dipali is an Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) staff. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedBipadtaran alleged that his younger brother promised to take care of Durgarani and managed to transfer the properties in his name. However, he left home without even paying the pending electricity bill of Rs 16,000. As a result, the electricity department cut the connection. On noticing mother’s condition, Bipadtaran informed the local Kurkuba Panchayat about the problem. Upon getting the information when Uppradhan Sona Bagdi and Panchayat Samiti member Shaikh Sabiruddin went to meet Durga, her daughter prevented them from entering the house. Facing obstruction both Bagdi and Sabiruddin had to go back. Later it was decided that the District Magistrate and local police will be informed. In the meantime, Bipadtaran was asked to look after his mother as the Panchayat will help him to do so. Locals alleged that a huge portion of land, which was once owned by Durgarani, is now in the grip of Asutosh. Despite knowing his mother’s plight, Asutosh did not even bother to turn up and do something for her. “We are going to worship Durga in a few days. It is very unfortunate that here a Durga is facing such a pathetic life,” said a neighbour of Durgarani.last_img read more

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IIT KGP hosts IndoGerman workshop on intelligent mobility

IIT KGP hosts IndoGerman workshop on intelligent mobility

first_imgKolkata: In an effort to give direction to the emerging intelligent transport mobility scene in India, IIT Kharagpur and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) from Germany have organised a two-day workshop at IIT KGP. The workshop which began Monday, is being held in the background of the newly-established Indo-German Collaborative Research Center on Intelligent Transportation Systems, and supported by the Indo-German Science and Technology Center (IGSTC) besides the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), an IIT KGP statement said Tuesday. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life Various transportation experts from Indian and German academia and industry such as TUM, IIT KGP, TU Berlin, TU Chemnitz, IIT Bhubaneswar, IIT Patna, ISI Kolkata, TH Ingolstadt, Siemens, Bosch, Infineon, Intel, TCS, Ola Cabs, — policy makers and law enforcement agencies are participating in the workshop. The discussion on the emerging intelligent mobility landscape in India included interaction among the participants on intelligent solutions for transportation integration, technologies for electric vehicles and batteries and systems and software challenges in next generation vehicular technologies. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed “Future transportation solutions in India must be developed with a holistic view of the wide milieu of options available in Indian cities and integrated end-to-end solutions will make public transport in India more reliable and comfortable and reduce the dependence on private vehicles Prof. Samarjit Chakraborty of TU Munich was quoted as saying in the statement. The collaborative research Center of IIT KGP and TUM is located within the IIT KGP campus. The IIT KGP statement pointed out that mobility landscape in India is undergoing a rapid transformation with the existing modalities of transportation facing unique challenges and 200 million new electric vehicles expected to hit the roads by 2030. “The focus of innovation today is in intelligent software for safety, driver assistance, comfort and entertainment. Combining the software and AI expertise of India with the manufacturing leadership of Germany can bring about transformational benefits to both countries,” the Dean of Sponsored Research & Industrial Consultancy, at IIT KGP, Prof Pallab Sengupta was quoted as saying in the statement.last_img read more

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Acupressure can cut fatigue in breast cancer survivors

Acupressure can cut fatigue in breast cancer survivors

first_imgAcupressure involves applying pressure with fingers, thumbs or a device to specific points on the body.  About a third of women experience moderate to severe fatigue – one of the most common long-term effects of breast cancer treatment – up to 10 years after the treatment ends.The findings revealed that acupressure reduced fatigue by 27 per cent to 34 per cent over six weeks.  Two-thirds of women who did relaxing acupressure – a certain type of the healing method –showed significant improvements in fatigue levels, measure of sleep quality, such as disrupted sleep and overall quality of life, the researchers said. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“Acupressure is easy to learn and patients can do it themselves. The intervention could be a low-cost option for treating fatigue,” Zick added. In the study, published in the journal JAMA Oncology, the team tested two types of acupressure: relaxing acupressure, used traditionally to treat insomnia and stimulating acupressure, which is used to increase energy. At the end of the trial, both acupressure treatments resulted in significant, sustained improvements in fatigue. However, the relaxing method appeared to cause more significant improvements in fatigue levels of breast cancer patients.last_img read more

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3 killed as bombs hurled shots fired at Joynagar MLAs car

3 killed as bombs hurled shots fired at Joynagar MLAs car

first_imgKolkata: Three persons including two Trinamool Congress workers were shot dead at Joynagar in South 24-Parganas on Thursday evening. Some miscreants also hurled bombs at the vehicle of Joynagar MLA Biswanath Das, in front of a petrol pump.Sources informed that Das had gone to the Trinamool party office at Baharu area and sent his driver along with another party worker to refuel his car. His driver had parked it outside the petrol pump and went to have tea. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeAll of a sudden, some miscreants started hurling bombs at the vehicle. Several bullets were also fired at the vehicle. As a result, the driver, the Trinamool worker and another person standing there sustained multiple bullet and splinter injuries. Local residents and pedestrians started running for their lives. Das claimed that he was the target of the miscreants as he regularly visits the place and used to have tea from a stall there. On Thursday, he was late and thus went directly to the part office. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed”I was the target. I visit the place regularly and interact with the people known to me there. Today I got late. So I went directly to Baharu party office. After reaching the party office I asked my driver to refuel the car, after which he went there with another party worker,” said Das. According to local sources, driver Selim Khan and Trinamool worker Saifuddin Khan were declared brought dead in a hospital, while the other injured person succumbed to his injuries at the hospital. Upon receiving the news, Superintendent of Police (SP), Baruipur Police District, Ajay Prasad, rushed to the spot along with other senior police officials. Prasad said: “we are trying to nab the culprits as soon as possible.” District Trinamool president Subhasish Chakraborty alleged that the attack was planned by an Opposition party.last_img read more

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Quitting cigarettes may cut bladder cancer risk in women

Quitting cigarettes may cut bladder cancer risk in women

first_imgQuitting cigarette smoking may significantly reduce risk of bladder cancer in postmenopausal women, a study has found. According to the study published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research, the most significant reduction in risk occurred in the first 10 years after quitting, with a modest but continued decline in later years. Although bladder cancer is a fairly rare cancer type, representing an estimated 4.6 per cent of new cancer cases in 2019, it is the most common malignancy of the urinary system, with high recurrence rate and significant mortality, said Yueyao Li, a PhD candidate at Indiana University in the US. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”Smoking is a well-established risk factor for bladder cancer, but findings on the relationship between duration of smoking cessation and the reduction in bladder cancer risk are inconsistent,” Li said in a statement. She added that while bladder cancer is more common in men, women often have worse outcomes, even when diagnosed at similar stages. In this study, researchers sought to analyse the dose-response relationship between time since quitting smoking and risk of bladder cancer among postmenopausal women, and to investigate whether risk among former smokers ever normalised to the risk faced by those who never smoked. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe researchers examined data from the Women’s Health Initiative, a long-term national health study of postmenopausal women. They included data from 143,279 women, all of whom had supplied information on whether they had ever smoked cigarettes, how much they had smoked, and whether they were current smokers. In all, 52.7 per cent of the women were categorised as “never smokers,” 40.2 per cent as former smokers, and 7.1 per cent as current smokers. As of February 28, 2017, the researchers had identified 870 cases of bladder cancer. The study showed that, in comparison to never smokers, former smokers had twice the risk of bladder cancer, and current smokers had more than three times the risk. The researchers performed analysis using various statistical models to analyse the association between years since quitting smoking and the risk of bladder cancer, and to account for variables such as education, race/ethnicity, BMI, and dietary factors. They found that the steepest reduction in risk occurred in the first 10 years after quitting smoking, with a 25 per cent drop. The risk continued to decrease after 10 years of quitting, but even after 30 or more years, risk remained higher for women who had smoked than those who never did. However, in time-updated models that reflected those who stopped smoking during the study period, the researchers found that compared with women who continued to smoke, those who quit smoking during the follow-up years had a 39 per cent decrease in bladder cancer risk, and risk continued to decline over time. Li said that while the biological mechanisms of the association between bladder cancer and smoking are not known, the study results indicate that women of any age should be discouraged from smoking, and even those who have smoked for many years stand to benefit from quitting. “Our study emphasises the importance of primary prevention (by not beginning to smoke) and secondary prevention (through smoking cessation) in the prevention of bladder cancer among postmenopausal women,” Li said. “Current smokers should be advised to quit smoking in order to reduce the risk of bladder cancer,” she added. Li cautioned that the study was based on postmenopausal women, so results may not be fully generalisable.last_img read more

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Colin 2016 Make NFL kickoffs great again Move them to the 50

Colin 2016 Make NFL kickoffs great again Move them to the 50

first_img His proposal is simple:Move kickoffs to the 50.Move touchbacks to the 40.Kickoffs can be downed like punts. Colin says that even though it sounds absurd, there are three simple ways that moving the kicking off to mid-field would improve the game.Increases onside kicks – Onside kicks will go up significantly because teams won’t be severely punished with bad field position if they’re unsuccessful. In Colin’s world, touchbacks already come out to the 40. An unsuccessful onside kick would likely end up at the 40 or the 35. Onside kicks are exciting for fans and good for the game. When is the last time you left the room for an onside kick?2. Fair catches will increase – Fair catches are good for player safety. If teams want to get cute and pooch kick it from the 50, the opposing team can fair catch or let it roll and it can be downed like a punt. Fewer car crash collisions. Better field position. More offense.3. Injuries will decrease – It’s called science. If you give 11 18-wheelers in shoulder pads less field to reach kick returner murdering speed, it will cause fewer injuries. Pretty simple.Colin realizes his plan sounds like a half baked idea on the surface, but in reality it’s a simple change that could make the game more exciting for fans.“You don’t want drives starting from the 7. That’s bad offense. That’s more punting. You want to instill more drama, onside kicks, and more offense. Drives start at the 40. What you want in this league is quarterbacks, drama, points.”Vote Cowherd. It’s the height of the Presidential campaign season, and Colin has resumed his personal campaign to move the kickoff to the 50-yard line. He didn’t want to get political, but somebody has to stand up.Yesterday, Commissioner Putin, err Goodell, made another statement hinting that he wants to eventually eliminate kickoffs from the NFL. Sad.Colin is a lover of the NFL and freedom, and wants to make the kickoff great again. The NFL tweaked the kickoff again this year by moving touchbacks up to the 25-yard line. That’s OK, but it’s not good enough. We can do better.Colin’s campaign to move the kickoff to the 50-yard line is gaining steam and has secured a HUUUUGE endorsement from former Vice President of Officiating for the NFL, Mike Pereira. It’s a movement people. Advertisementlast_img read more

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VIDEO Brazilian surfer sets world record by riding 80foot monster wave

VIDEO Brazilian surfer sets world record by riding 80foot monster wave

first_imgHere’s the old record 78-foot run by McNamara. Not too bad either. On November 8, 2017 at Nazare beach in Portugal, Brazilian big wave surfer Rodrigo Koxa successfully rode a massive wave in one of the more ridiculous, and dangerous-athletic feats you’ll likely ever see. Now it’s officially being called the biggest wave ever surfed.After careful deliberation, The World Surf League has announced that it’s officials determined Koxo’s wave was 80-feet, breaking the old record of 78-feet, set by American Garrett McNamara in 2011.If you haven’t seen Koxo’s record setting Nazare ride, watch it here. There aren’t many sports where the consequence of failure is certain death. It’s a different ball game. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Middlekauff goes indepth with Johnny Manziels agent Erik Burkhardt on all things

Middlekauff goes indepth with Johnny Manziels agent Erik Burkhardt on all things

first_imgMiddlekauff goes in depth in an extended interview with Johnny Manziel’s agent Erik Burkhardt. They discuss all things Comeback SZN, including Johnny’s decision to play in Canada; if the 2-year contract is as ironclad as it’s been made out to be; why he fired Johnny, and why he decided to take him on as a client again.Erik also tells his incredible backstory, his path to becoming an NFL Agent and the business side of representing and recruiting clients.John takes listener questions in Middlekauff’s Mailbag. Advertisement Follow John on Twitter at @JohnMiddlekauff and download and subscribe to the 3 and Out on Apple, iHeart or wherever you download your podcasts now! Rate 5 Stars and leave your questions in the iTunes comments and John will answer them every week.last_img read more

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Is It a Wheelchair or a Tank Its Both Actually

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. This isn’t your grandmother’s wheelchair. For one thing, it has tank-like treads and a roll bar. For another, it can hit a top speed of 22 mph.Calling it an electric mobility scooter is kind of like calling the Pacific Ocean a lake, but that’s technically what it is. Austrian futuristic machine manufacturer Mattro Mobility Revolutions created der Ziesel “to connect freedom with fun,” and they certainly seem to have done that — assuming your idea of fun is doing donuts in the Alpine snow, tooling around an orchard in Italy (with Vivaldi playing in the background, of course), and doing it all in eco-friendly comfort and safety.And really, who doesn’t love that? Here’s a look at what it can do in snowy conditions:Mattro calls the Ziesel a “barrier-free sport-vehicle,” combining sustainable and environmentally friendly technologies with outdoor fun. It looks like a cross between a wheelchair and a tank, with thick four-season treads and a double-suspension arm chassis to give it impressive traction on just about any terrain, including snow, mud, grass or sand.The high-performance motor is powered by an intelligent lithium-ion battery and the autonomic heating system keeps it going even in extremely low temperatures. It has variable driving modes, available LED lighting and a roll cage reminiscent of a dune buggy. And the high-precision, speed contingent steering system is controlled by one intuitive joystick.Consider it the sport utility of wheelchairs. Got stuff to haul? The Zeisel has a tow bar and can be equipped with a snowmobile trailer to help carry your gear to the top of a glacier and back. And lest you fear that the grumbling engine might mar the serene beauty of the natural setting, worry not: the electric motor is nearly silent.Powder hounds and beach lovers alike can now get closer to nature than ever before, with a level of independence and mobility that can make the most ardent outdoors buffs happy.The sticker price isn’t for everyone, however. The Zeisel will set you back about $24,000 for the basic model.What crazy apps and gadgets have you come across lately? Let us know by emailing us at FarOutTech@entrepreneur.com or by telling us in the comments below. November 25, 2013 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 2 min read Register Now »last_img read more

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