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Sustainability-focused trade show promotes best practices

first_imgLight bulbs, hand-dryers, or chilled- and hot- water pumps rarely evoke dedicated interest or enthusiasm, but for Harvard’s building managers and facility leaders the energy and cost savings these technologies can deliver tend to inspire such reactions.To capture this enthusiasm, Harvard’s first-ever sustainability-focused Operations and Maintenance trade show was held on Tuesday January 21. The trade show, organized by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) Green Program, a partnership between FAS and the Harvard Office for Sustainability, and Harvard Strategic Procurement, was an opportunity to promote best practices in the field, and to unite building managers and facility leaders, who work behind the scenes to optimize building energy systems and performance.“Our goal was to bring together and promote one community, within and beyond Harvard, focused on energy efficiency and sustainability work,” said Gosia Sklodowska, senior manager of the FAS Green Program.Twenty outside vendors and contractors participated in the trade show, including NSTAR, Swegon, Grundfos, Stirling, and Dyson, showcasing everything from high-efficiency lab freezers to air handling units and sustainable insulation. NSTAR, Phillips, and GE also gave presentations to the attendees on various incentive programs and the resources available to Harvard clients.Facilities teams from across all of Harvard’s 12 Schools and departments browsed the latest cutting-edge products, remarking on the value of having a trade show to compare, and discuss the multitude of vendors and products. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Gregory Crawford named new president of Miami (Ohio)

first_imgGregory Crawford, vice president, associate provost and former dean of the College of Science, was elected president of Miami University (Ohio) on Friday, according to a Notre Dame press release.Over the past year, Crawford led an effort to increase the University’s presence in California, initially in the Bay Area. According to the release, he focused on expanding internship and employment opportunities for Notre Dame undergraduates and recruiting students from leading California high schools.“For six years, [Crawford] was a dynamic leader of the College of Science and, for the past year, he has taken the lead in developing our California initiative,” University provost Thomas Burish said in the press release. “We remain committed to that initiative and, between now and Greg’s departure in July, I will work with him and others on how best to build upon the foundation he has helped to lay.”Crawford served as the William K. Warren Foundation Dean of the College of Science from 2008 to July 2015, according the press release. As dean, he helped found the Department of Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics and launch four new master’s programs. Crawford also led fundraising initiatives for the Warren Family Research Center for Drug Discovery and the Boler-Parseghian Center for Rare and Neglected Diseases.Crawford, a native of Elyria, Ohio, will assume his new position on July 1, according to the release. He earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from Kent State University.“News of Greg’s election as the next president of Miami University is bittersweet,” Burish said in the release. “While we are tremendously pleased that he has this wonderful opportunity to lead a first-rate university, we also are sorry to see him go.”Crawford came to Notre Dame in 2008, leaving his post as dean of engineering at Brown University, where he was a professor of physics and engineering since 1996, according to the release. During his time at Notre Dame, he worked to raise money and awareness for cancer and rare disease research, biking more than 11,000 miles across the country in support of research for Niemann-Pick Type C disease.Tags: College of Science, Dr. Thomas G. Burish, Gregory Crawford, Miami University (Ohio)last_img read more

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Duncan Hall hosts tower climb in honor of 9/11 first responders

first_imgHaving lived in New York during their childhoods, sophomores Conor Milligan and Patrick Creaven were both directly impacted by the events of 9/11.Creaven’s dad, who lived in New York at the time, watched the plane fly into the south tower and had friends who were killed in the tragedy. Milligan’s family knew a police officer — Ramon Suarez — who died while rescuing people.So the two Duncan Hall residents came together last spring and started planning a new dorm signature event to honor first responders — particularly those who sacrificed their lives in the aftermath of the terrorist attack. On 9/11, this Wednesday, Duncan Hall will host ND 110, a “9/11 Tower Climb,” to raise money for Heart 9/11, a charity founded by New York first responders.CLAIRE KOPISCHKE | The Observer “There’s a lot of talk going on now about how the police are terrible and disrespecting them, but they put their lives on the line every time they go on the clock [and] even if they’re off the clock, because [they] keep our communities safe,” Milligan said.Participants will climb 110 flights of stairs, the number that firefighters had to climb in the Twin Towers. The event will be held in Jordan Hall, and organizers estimate it will take about 45 minutes to complete the 24 laps of the front, south-side staircase which equals 110 flights of stairs.“It’s not a race — it’s in honor of the firefighters,” Milligan said. “Not everyone starts at 5 o’clock. People come in and it takes about 45 minutes, but you come and do it at your own pace.”The event will run from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. with participants staggered in waves of up to 100 at a time. The event took inspiration from Storm the Stadium, an annual University event sponsored by the Office of Military and Veterans Affairs. Milligan and Creaven met with firefighters who said they felt the event was more focused on honoring members of the military and wanted to create an event specifically geared towards recognized first responders.“I know a decent amount of them went to Storm the Stadium but … it’s not for them specifically,” Creaven said. “So for them to have something for them [specifically], they appreciate it a lot.”Milligan said he and Creaven discussed the event with firefighters from the South Bend Fire Department in April and began looking at ways to recognize first responders in particular on campus.”We met with them and sort of asked them, ‘Do you guys feel like an event like Storm the Stadium really accommodates first responders?’” Milligan said. “And they mentioned that, especially in a community like South Bend, there’s sort of a disconnect between the community and first responders, and then also that divide between campus and South Bend. So they were like, ‘Yeah, Storm the Stadium is great, but it’s for military and veterans.’“So a first responder event was something that they really wanted. … We thought this would be a good way to bridge the campus-community divide and sort of unite us with first responders.”About a dozen first responders have already signed up for the event, amongst 55 pre-registered participants. Creaven and Milligan said they hope to have at least 200 participants in order to raise around $2,000 for Heart 9/11.Milligan said the tower climb is the only event of its kind within a two-hour radius of campus. As such, he said he hopes the event will have even more of an appeal in the local area.“The closest one might be in Chicago,” he said. “So, it’d be a good draw to get an event in the Michiana area. And Notre Dame is really good at hosting large events, with football and everything so [it] can very easily tack on something like this.”Creaven and Milligan spent months planning the event, submitting their SAO request during the summer. This is the first year Duncan Hall will host the tower climb. In past years, the dorm considered the Bald and the Beautiful to be its signature event, though the popular event is now run through a club.Milligan said he looks forward to honoring firefighters and first responders at Wednesday’s event, as the community comes together to remember 9/11.“It’s a defining moment for our country,” Milligan said. “A lot of us on campus now were very, very young when it happened, but it shaped our daily lives, so we never forget that it happened.” Participation in the event is free for first responders and costs $15 for other members of the community. Event t-shirts can also be purchased for $15. Registration is available online and at the time of the event.Tags: 9/11, climb, Duncan Hall, honorlast_img read more

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Cyber crops

first_imgBy Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaA team of scientists has created a computer program that canmodel an entire crop cycle, from planting to harvesting, in justseconds.The software is called Decision SupportSystem for Agrotechnology Transfer, or DSSAT. It was createdby a team of researchers fromthe universities of Georgia, Florida, Hawaii, Guelph and IowaState and the International Center for Soil Fertility andAgricultural Development. Planting cyber fieldsDSSAT allows the user to simulate acrop’s growth, yield, water and nutrient requirements and theenvironment’s impact on agricultural production.The program wasn’t developed overnight. In fact, the software’sfourth version was released earlier this year. About 50researchers and graduate students from across the globe met onthe UGA campus in Griffin, Ga., May 17-26 to try out the latestDSSAT software.”This software program is by no means meant to be a substitutefor actual experimentation,” said Gerrit Hoogenboom, a DSSATdeveloper and an agricultural engineer with the UGA College ofAgricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Experimental data isstill needed to establish credibility for models like DSSAT.” Not a research replacementHoogenboom also said crop modeling software, like DSSAT,is not a substitute for criticalthought. “The results you obtain from the software are not ultimatetruths, and they’re not meant to replace real experiments, realdata or critical thinking,” he said. “Anytime you use a computermodel you should question the results.”Though not a substitute for the real thing, the computer modelcan have great value to researchers, educators, extension agentsand consultants. “Computer models can provide an easy and very fast comparison ofmany different crop management scenarios and the interaction withlocal weather and soil conditions,” Hoogenboom said. Sharing information with farmersDSSAT simulates the growth of crops like peanuts,sunflowers, sugarcane, wheat, soybeans, rice, tomatoes, sorghum,millet, barley, potatoes, corn, blackeyed-peas and dry beans. Thenext version of DSSAT will be of particular interest toresearchers in the southeastern U.S. as cotton will be added tothe simulated crop list. This version is expected to be releasedin two years.The crop-simulation information gained through the DSSAT software will be shared with farmers.”Our goal is to educate the people who talk to farmers directly,”said Ken Boote, a DSSAT developer and University of Floridaagronomist. “Consultants, ag industry representatives andextension agents have the potential to spread the word tofarmers. Those farmers with interest in this technology wouldalso benefit from actually using the software themselves.”Boote says the way the software presents the data is an essentialpart of the success of DSSAT.”You can’t give numbers that no one can understand,” he said.”Our program calculates crop growth and development in amathematical sense and then presents it through graphics.”DSSAT has also been used as an effective tool after a crop hasbeen harvested to identify the source of production managementproblems.”It’s a way to see the whole picture and what is limiting thecrop,” Boote said. “The software actually works better this way.”In the early stages, the software was testedusing several years of real-crop data from Florida and Georgiafarms. Applications continue to growDSSAT has been used on food security projects in Africa and otherdeveloping countries, too, and to study the impact climate changehas on food production.”It’s been used in Arkansas to help with early-season soybeanplantings, in Kentucky for determining planting dates, in Georgiafor predicting agricultural water usage and in Africa to diagnoseyield loss of peanut crops from disease,” Boote said. “The listof applications is never-ending.”Two UGA agricultural economics students are using the program toevaluate crop insurance. They hope to show the actual risks offailure that farmers face. Two University of Florida students areusing the software to predict the amount of hay a farmer’s fieldwill produce when planted with bahia or bermuda grass.There are currently more than 1,500 registered users from morethan 90 countries using the software. “DSSAT users share their work and their data via a computerlistserver and a Web site,” Hoogenboom said. “In this way, thesoftware contributes to the whole scientific community.”last_img read more

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The Heart of Al-Qaida Remains on the Border between Afghanistan and Pakistan

first_imgBy Dialogo November 10, 2010 U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said that the “heart” of al-Qaida remains in the border regions between Afghanistan and Pakistan, even if its influence extends to the Arabian Peninsula and North Africa. Al-Qaida’s leaders continue operating from this border region, from which “they provide the guidance, they provide the priorities, they provide legitimacy to other al-Qaida affiliates that are developing in other places, including in the Arabian Peninsula, in Yemen in particular, and in northern Africa, in the Maghreb,” said Gates, who is visiting Malaysia. On another subject, Gates said that the United States is open to the idea of prolonging its troops’ presence in Iraq beyond 2011, but that the decision depends on Bagdad. “In terms of a future strategic relationship beyond 2011 (…) initiative clearly needs to come from the Iraqis. We are open to discussing it,” Gates said. Many observers believe that Iraq could ask the United States not to withdraw its troops entirely at the end of 2011, since the country faces numerous security problems.last_img read more

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Create a bigger, better and brighter future for your members

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Money can be stressful for people.The numbers don’t lie. According to the National Financial Capability Study:More than half of Americans (53%) agree that “thinking about my personal finances can make me feel anxious”As many as 44% of Americans agreed that “discussing my finances can make my heart race or make me feel stressed”A whopping 63% of millennials, defined as those 18 to 34 years old, said they are financially anxious, and 55% feel stressedWomen, as well, are financially anxious; 57% of women said they felt financially anxious versus 47% of men. And 49% of women feel stressed when discussing their finances versus 38% of men.Financial stress can take a toll on people’s health, relationships and overall sense of well-being. They are looking for someone they can trust to guide them beyond their questions and concerns towards a bigger, better and brighter future. continue reading »last_img read more

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SoftBank leads $250 million investment in Tier in first e-scooter bet

first_imgA woman holds her smartphone with the app of the electric scooter sharing provider Tier Mobility next to an e-scooter to use it. Hauke-Christian Dittrich/dpa (Photo by Hauke-Christian Dittrich/picture alliance via Getty Images)Hauke-Christian Dittrich | picture alliance via Getty Images – Advertisement – SoftBank made the investment in Tier through Vision Fund 2, a $108 billion successor to its original technology fund that gained infamy for its troubled bet on office rental service WeWork. The round also attracted backing from existing investors including Mubadala, Northzone, Goodwater Capital, White Star Capital, Novator and RTP Global. However, Mubadala didn’t invest in Tier as part of Vision Fund 2. The Abu Dhabi sovereign wealth fund contributed to SoftBank’s first Vision Fund, but — as CNBC reported in May — it has been hesitant to back the new fund.According to the Financial Times, which first reported the news, Tier is now valued at just below $1 billion. That means it’s close to securing a so-called “unicorn” valuation and, according to the FT, makes it the second-most valuable e-scooter company after Bird — overtaking Lime.Profitability- Advertisement – – Advertisement –center_img Some e-scooter start-ups claim they saw a swift recovery in demand over the summer as economies reopened. Many have been racing to take part in trials in the U.K. as the country explores legalizing e-scooters.But there are lingering fears over the financial sustainability of the sector, particularly as a number of European countries re-enter lockdowns and winter approaches. Nonetheless, Tier says it managed to reach profitability for the first time this year. LONDON — German electric scooter rental firm Tier announced Tuesday that it’s raised $250 million in a funding round led by SoftBank’s second Vision Fund.It’s the first time the Japanese tech investor has made a bet on the nascent scooter-sharing space and comes as a number of countries in Europe re-enter lockdowns to slow a resurgence in coronavirus cases. E-scooter companies were heavily hit by the first round of lockdowns, with a number of providers slashing jobs to survive.For its part, Tier says it hasn’t had to make any layoffs related to the pandemic. A spokesperson told CNBC the firm “made one or two performance related adjustments as part of standard business practice but nothing outside of that.”- Advertisement – Tier has been profitable since June, the company’s CEO Lawrence Leuschner told CNBC in a recent interview. “We will be very close to full profitability this year,” he added.Tier said it would use the fresh cash to expand in Europe and install thousands of charging stations in various cities to power its vehicles. The company, which in May launched its own electric moped-sharing service, said it’s also looking to secure additional debt financing to rollout more vehicles.“Micro-mobility fills a large gap left by traditional urban car usage and presents a viable alternative to legacy transit systems,” said Yanni Pipilis, managing partner at SoftBank Investment Advisers. “Tier has a proven track record in establishing long standing partnerships with cities and regulators, combined with a technology-led approach to develop leading customer propositions.”last_img read more

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Vote no on Ballston’s sewer project

first_imgUnfortunately, Nolan Road is one of the few needing grinder pumps, which will result in a hookup fee of close to $10,000 along with an additional sewer tax of $926 per year for 30 years.Many are terrified if this passes they will not be able to afford to live in our peaceful community and will lose their homes.As 77-year old, 52-year resident of Nolan Road has asked: “Where will I go when I cannot afford the hookup or yearly fee of $926? Who will take me in?”This is why I am voting no on April 18.GEORGE KLINE JR.Ballston Lake More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesGuilderland girls’ soccer team hands BH-BL first league lossEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionCared, anxious, distressed. All emotions shared by many of the neighbors including myself on Nolan Road in the town of Ballston, concerning the April 18 vote to have sewers, which will result in a mandated hookup for everyone on certain roads.last_img read more

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Some 50 world leaders call for post-pandemic cooperation

first_imgCanada and Jamaica organized the conference.Sustainable development goals for 2030 “are more crucial than ever,” said European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen. “We have to work and fight together.”Several leaders, such as German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron, said the crisis could be an opportunity to grow a “more resilient” economy to aid the fight against global warming.Deploring a “deep questioning of multilateralism,” Macron stressed “cooperation is essential” as well as “support for the most fragile countries,” especially in Africa. World leaders on Thursday called for resilience and cooperation after the pandemic recedes, during a UN videoconference in which the United States, China and Russia did not participate.About 50 leaders took part in the event on development financing, with Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte saying in a recorded message that the goal must be to “leave no one behind.”South African President Cyril Ramaphosa said “we need to be innovative, think outside the box,” echoing Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Mauritania President Mohamed Ould Ghazouani called for the “systematic and immediate cancellation of debt.”UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres asked leaders to “go further” than they already have on debt relief for vulnerable countries, in a spirit of “needs-based solidarity and transparency.” Guterres applauded the meeting, playing down the absence of the three missing world powers. He told reporters that the United States, China and Russia would participate in six working groups created at Thursday’s session, for which meetings are scheduled for July, September and December. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he hoped the world would “build back better,” adding “we must work together across borders” to avoid a new pandemic and to help global recovery.Costa Rican President Carlos Alvarado Quesada said the world after COVID-19 should be dominated by “solidarity, not profit.”center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Arsenal have ‘made a mistake’ by selling Alex Iwobi to Everton, reckons Nwankwo Kanu

first_img Comment Kanu played for Arsenal from 1999-2004 (Picture: Getty Images)‘What he brings week in, week out, the fans need to appreciate that.‘I think he is still young and those are the type of people you want in the team, people who grew up here, who knows everything about the club and wants to die for the club.‘He was one of them, so for us to lose him and to let him go, was a shock. I couldn’t really believe we did it, but that’s football.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityAnother Nigerian legend has weighed in on Iwobi’s career move and Joseph Yobo also believes Arsenal’s loss is Everton’s gain, where he expects him to shine.‘Everton is the perfect club for a brave player like Alex Iwobi and I know it’s the right step to becoming a great player,’ Yobo told BBC Sport.‘The manager [Marco Silva] is building an amazing team and he believes so much in Alex to add him to his squad.‘Already he has started well by scoring two headed goals and it’s just the beginning of bigger things to come.’MORE: Francesco Totti explains how Arsenal and Man Utd flop Henrikh Mkhitaryan can be a success at RomaMORE: Bordeaux chairman explains why Laurent Koscielny insisted on leaving Arsenal Phil HaighTuesday 10 Sep 2019 10:35 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link394Shares Alex Iwobi has made a good start to his Everton career (Picture: Getty Images)Arsenal hero Nwankwo Kanu has questioned his former club’s decision to let Alex Iwobi leave for Everton during the transfer window.Iwobi signed for the Toffees on 8 August for an initial fee of £28m, which could rise to £34m with potential add-ons.The 23-year-old has started his new life on Merseyside in impressive fashion, scoring twice in his first three games for Everton, headed goals against Lincoln in the Carabao Cup and Wolves in the Premier League.The Nigeria international had been at Arsenal throughout his career, joining the club as a schoolboy, and Kanu believes this connection to the Gunners means Unai Emery should have kept hold of the midfielder.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘I would say they made a mistake, 100 per cent, Why they let him go, I don’t know,’ Kanu told Goal.‘He’s a boy who, in and out, is Arsenal. He always wanted to do his best for the club. He loves the club, but not only that he can play football. Arsenal have ‘made a mistake’ by selling Alex Iwobi to Everton, reckons Nwankwo Kanu Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

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