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Big business for charity

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Big business for charity AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis According to a new report launched today which investigates the philanthropy of executives in the FTSE 350 companies, business leaders make a vital contribution to the UK’s voluntary sector. The value of their time could potentially be worth as much as £3 million every year.Making time for charity, published by Charities Aid Foundation and sponsored by Deloitte & Touche, outlines the contribution made by the UK’s top business leaders in detail. It explores the reasons why these influential people make time for charity; how much time they give; and the benefits to themselves, the charity and their company.Find out more from CAF. Advertisement Howard Lake | 2 July 2000 | News read more

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The Market is Doing its Job

first_img Facebook Twitter Previous articleISDA Announces David King as Local Foods Program ManagerNext articleUSDA Planning to Move Ahead with Second Beef Checkoff Gary Truitt By Gary Truitt – Oct 29, 2014 The Market is Doing its Job Facebook Twitter Home Market The Market is Doing its Jobcenter_img WheatWhile the action has been subdued in relationship to beans and corn, wheat is trying to climb higher once again this morning.  A higher close would make it three in a row but at least at this point, we have not been able to reach up to the highs posted this past Friday.On the news front there is little additional that I can add to the wheat story.  There are continued concerns about abnormally cold weather in Eastern Europe and into Russia.  That said, it was reported overnight that Russian exports to date are running over 32% above a year ago at this time. There are a few tenders floating around but I suspect the sales tomorrow morning will once again be on the low side as we are still not really competitive on the world stage.  Of course, no one expected the beans sales last week either. Harvest in Brazil has finally been able to pick up and it was reported that in the state of Parana they have reached 72% complete.  This would actually be 12% ahead of the pace last year.  Also, yesterday it was announced that Argentina would be able to supply at least 5.5 MMT of wheat to Brazil this coming year.I continue to believe that December futures will encounter very stiff resistance around the 5.40 level and should be within days of turning back lower. CornWhile this move has really been about meal and beans we have done a pretty reasonable job of forcing the corn short out as well. That said the failure to hold the gains yesterday may have been the first sign that the move has about run its course.  Prices have been firmer again overnight but so far have lacked the enthusiasm to reach back against yesterday’s highs. I understand that farmers have been rewarding this move as selling picked up notably yesterday.  We will have the weekly ethanol report issued later this morning, which should reflect a production of at least 900,000 bbd and export sales in the morning.  Like wheat, U.S. corn on a FOB basis is not competitive. We have scattered showers in the forecast across the upper Midwest over the next few days and cooler temperature but nothing that should create major disruptions with harvest.  Yield reports continue to range from average to exceptional.  I suspect once we have rolled the calendar over to November, the focus and discussion will revert to the next crop production estimate, which by the way will be the final one of the calendar year. Unless we see another shock move from meal, it would appear that this corn move has pretty well expended itself.  As such, I expect to see prices track lower then into at least Thanksgiving. SoybeansThe bean market surrendered the majority of days gains by the close yesterday and although we have bounced again overnight, we are contained within Tuesday’s action.  As I commented yesterday, the situation that we are facing in meal and beans is logistical in nature and the job of the market is to provide economic incentive to try and correct that.  While that can be accomplished by making other substitute products economically viable but also help to compensate for additional transportation expenses.  It has been reported that trucks from the eastern and southeastern feed market have been arriving at processing plants to haul meal.  Not as efficient as rail but should help alleviate the problem for the interim.  There has already been discussion of the competitiveness of bringing South American meal into the east coast and while probably not economically feasible at this point, could also provide an alternative.Rains have continued to fall through what had been the hot and dry regions of Brazil and it would appear the dry pattern has been broken.  The late arriving rains though have meant a late start to planting as well and it is estimated that it stands at less that half of a year ago with 15 to 17% of the country planted.  Parana is estimated to have 30% of the crop planted, Mato Grosso do Sul 24%, Matto Grosso at 16% and Goias at 8%.Farmer selling has reportedly picked up nicely over the past couple days. We could still easily see the bean market hold at these levels for the next day or so as the market tries to sort out these transportation issues but I continue to believe as with the corn and wheat trade that we should see the scale tip lower in November as we refocus on the upcoming November USDA estimates. www.thehueberreport.com/freetrial SHARE Oct 29, 2014www.thehueberreport.com/freetrial SHARElast_img read more

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Violence, arrests and censorship in all four corners of India

first_img In rural India, journalists face choice between covering pandemic and survival Reporters Without Borders condemns a wave of violence and censorship against the media in various parts of the country in the past few weeks, including beatings of journalists and media restrictions in Kashmir, a newspaper editor arrested in Tamil Nadu, TV stations attacked in New Delhi and Maharashtra, a journalist fatally injured in a bombing in Uttar Pradesh and a Japanese journalist denied a visa. Armed conflict between Maoist guerrillas and government security forces is also having disturbing repercussions on journalists in the affected states, especially Chhattisgarh, under threat from both sides.All these incidents jeopardise the safety and freedom of the media.“The many political and social conflicts in India do not alone explain the level of violence and intolerance towards the media, especially as the state governments and the authorities in New Delhi are at least partly responsible for many of these press freedom violations,” Reporters Without Borders said. “’We urge Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to issue a public reminder that press freedom must be enforced with the same determination throughout the country.”Editor detained in Tamil NaduReporters Without Borders calls for the release of A. S. Mani, the editor of the Tamil-language magazine Naveena Netrikkan, who has been held since 19 July in Chennai, in the southeastern state of Tamil Nadu. One of his colleagues told Reporters Without Borders he was arrested on the orders of Police Commissioner S. R. Jangid after publishing a story about a case of alleged corruption within the police.Mani already spent a month in prison in 2009 (http://en.rsf.org/india-editor-released-after-a-month-in-05-11-2009,3491…). On his release, he told Reporters Without Borders: “Press freedom and press rights are being considerably curtailed by political pressures, particularly in Tamil Nadu. The press is not able to expose the evil at the roots of the society” (http://en.rsf.org/india-two-journalists-held-in-different-04-12-2009,352…).TV stations ransackedIn New Delhi, the headquarters of the Headlines Today TV station were attacked by several thousand Hindu nationalist activists including members of Rashtriya Swayamsewak Sangh (RSS) on 16 July after the station linked RSS leaders to bombings on Muslim targets. A Headlines Today journalist told Reporters Without Borders that a cameraman was injured and the station sustained a lot of damage.Also on 16 July, a crowd forced its way into a studio in the Marathi-language TV station Ze 24 Taas in Kolhapur, in the western state of Maharashtra, as it was about to broadcast a debate on the border dispute with the neighbouring state of Karnataka. Two of the station’s employees were injured. The nationalist group Shiv Sena was blamed. According to Indian press reports, 11 Shiv Sena members surrendered to the police and were released on bail. Visa cancelledThe central government has meanwhile refused to extend the visa of Shogo Takahashi, the New Delhi bureau chief of Japanese state broadcaster NHK since 2008. He has been forced to leave the country. Indian press reports said the government thought his reporting was too negative and focused too often on poverty. Takahashi had helped to produced a documentary series called “Indo no Shogeki” (The Impact of India).Several dozen foreign journalists are currently barred from reporting in India because the authorities refuse to give them visas.Beatings and restrictions in KashmirIn the northern state of Jammu and Kashmir, journalists were subjected to major restrictions from 7 to 9 July because of a curfew imposed by the police and army in response to a wave of demonstrations and unrest. Reporters were unable to move about in the summer capital, Srinagar, because the local authorities cancelled their curfew passes. No newspapers were published on 10 July in protest against the restrictions.Several incidents involving journalists were reported in connection with the demonstrations. Members of the Central Reserve Police Force beat 12 journalists covering a demonstration on 6 July. On the same day, Izhar Wani of Agence France-Presse wanted to rush home after being told that his wife and daughters had fainted from the effects of all the tea-gas discharged in the area. But he was prevented because his pass had been cancelled. Mark Magnier of the Los Angeles Times was hit by a police officer near Srinagar’s Lake Dal on 7 July. Riyaz Masroor of the BBC’s Urdu-language service sustained a fracture to his left hand when policemen hit him on 9 July. “I left my home because the Department of Information called me to collect my pass, but policemen on the street attacked me with batons,” Masroor told Reporters Without Borders.Suhail Bukhari of the TV station NewsX was arrested on 10 July after getting his facts wrong in a report. He and the station apologised for the mistake but they are facing the possibility of being prosecuted on a charge of inciting violence. As a result of the protests and unrest in Kashmir, the authorities imposed new restrictions on the free flow of information: censorship of local cable TV stations, censorship of certain Facebook pages and restrictions on mobile phones during the demonstrations. The newspaper Greater Kashmir reported that the organisers of a Facebook group were summoned for questioning by the police for posting reports and video footage of the rioting in Srinagar.Killed by a bombFinally, Reporters Without Borders is saddened to learn that Vijay Pratap Singh, a veteran reporter for the Indian Express daily, died on 20 July in a military hospital in New Delhi from the injuries he received when a bomb went off outside the home of Uttar Pradesh finance minister Nand Gopal Nandi in Bahadurganj on 12 July. The minister, who appeared to be the target, and four other people were also injured by the explosion. Singh leaves a wife, a five-year-old son and a daughter aged 11 months. News Organisation India: RSF denounces “systemic repression” of Manipur’s media April 27, 2021 Find out more News Help by sharing this information Follow the news on India Receive email alerts June 10, 2021 Find out morecenter_img IndiaAsia – Pacific News RSF_en to go further IndiaAsia – Pacific News July 23, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Violence, arrests and censorship in all four corners of India RSF demands release of detained Indian journalist Siddique Kappan, hospitalised with Covid-19 March 3, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Companies that cooperate with dictatorships must be sanctioned

first_img Organisation Online freedoms RSF_en Help by sharing this information Online freedoms center_img Reporters Without Borders condemns the criminal cooperation that exists between many western companies, especially those operating in the new technology area, and authoritarian regimes.“These companies no longer have any reservations about collaborating with criminal governments,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Jean-François Julliard said. “Providing dictatorships with communication equipment or confidential data is irresponsible. A total of 122 bloggers and netizens are currently detained worldwide. The companies that work with these governments are complicit and responsible for the fate of these detainees. Financial sanctions should be imposed on companies collaborating with governments that jail bloggers or censor the Internet.“Without financial sanctions, these practices will not stop. Companies are not above the law. There are courts that try illicit practices by companies. Why shouldn’t they try the criminal responsibility of companies that collaborate with regimes that are guilty of crimes? Provision should be made at the national level for penalizing such collaboration, and referral to the International Criminal Court should be considered when companies become the accomplices to war crime by dictators. After being concerned about impunity for dictators, the world should now be worrying about impunity for companies.“Human lives are at stake. Must they be sacrificed for the sake of profits? The leaders of international companies operating in the new technology domain, especially telecommunications surveillance, in Libya, Syria, Burma, China, Turkmenistan and other authoritarian counties should think about their responsibility. Their tools, their equipment and their know-how are being used for criminal purposes.”These technologies are at the heart of a new war. Emails can now be intercepted, Skype calls can be recorded, webcams can be turned on remotely and Internet content can be modified without the users knowing. Reporters Without Borders urges Internet users to be much more careful.Reporters Without Borders reiterates the need for legislation banning cooperation between companies and dictatorships on the lines of the proposed Global Online Freedom Act (GOFA) in the United States and its European equivalent. Like the EU regulations on trade in products that could be used for “capital punishment, torture or other cruel treatment,” there is now a need to introduce international regulations on the provision of technology that threaten cyber-citizens, to control the export of certain technologies, to create a monitoring body that is independent of governments and to have dissuasive sanctions ready. Companies should also have legal and official recourse against measures in countries like China or Iran that force them to obstruct the free flow of information.The GOFA, a bill submitted to the US Congress in 2006 and still awaiting adoption, aims to prevent US companies from “cooperating with repressive governments in transforming the Internet into a tool of censorship and surveillance.” The European equivalent, submitted to the European Parliament on 17 July 2008 by Dutch MEP Jules Maaten of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE), aims to forestall online censorship possibilities and to regulate the potentially repressive activities of European Internet companies. It would create an Office of Global Internet Freedom with the job of combating online censorship by the most repressive governments and protecting the personal data of Internet users.These measures are now urgent and necessary. Examples of companies cooperating with such governments are on the increase. Referring in May to Microsoft’s acquisition of the Internet telephony company Skype, Microsoft Russia president Nikolay Pryanishnikov said he was ready to provide its source code to the Russian security services. Microsoft is nonetheless a leading member of the Global Network Initiative, an alliance that brings private-sector companies and investment funds together with organizations that defend freedoms.Many other companies that have shown no interest in the GNI’s principles seem ready to stop at nothing to conquer new markets. Bull, Nokia, BlueCoat, Netfirms and Cisco have all yielded to the lure of profits. Reporters Without Borders has compiled the following summary of their repressive practices.Libya: Bull (France) and Boeing (Unites States)Amesys, a subsidiary of the French computer company Bull, reportedly provided Col. Muammar Gaddafi with Internet surveillance equipment, including a system called Eagle that can intercept email sent via Hotmail, Gmail and Yahoo! and monitor MSN and AIM instant messaging. According to the Wall Street Journal, several files containing transcripts of phone and chat conversations between government opponents were found in Libyan intelligence agency computers.Boeing and its offshoot Narus, which specializes in software that protects against Internet attacks, are also suspected of cooperating with the Gaddafi regime. They have denied this.Syria and BlueCoat (United States)According to a study of Syria’s censorship infrastructure last month by Telecomix, Fhim and Reflets.info, the Syrian government’s phishing and website blocking is assisted by the US company BlueCoat. The passwords and “private” communications of Yahoo! Messenger, MSN and Facebook users are being recorded with the help of technology provided by BlueCoat, the survey said. BlueCoat has allegedly provided Syria with at least two different technologies, including Deep Packet Inspection (DPI), which can be used to intercept all sorts of communication including emails and phone calls as well as photos and messages posted on online social networks such and Facebook and Twitter, and proxy filters.Bahrain and Nokia Siemens Network (Finland)Nokia Siemens Network (NSN) has been accused of providing the monitoring technology that the Bahraini authorities have been using to spy on the emails, mobile phone conversations and text message of dozens of human rights activists. Abdul Al-Khanjar, an activist who was detained from August 2010 to February 2011, said the security officials who interrogated him revealed that they had the records of the messages he had sent from his phone. Speaking on condition of anonymity, several Nokia employees confirmed that this technology had been provided to Bahrain. Ahmed Al-Doseri, director of information and communications at Bahrain’s Telecommunications Regulatory Authority, confirmed that Bahrain was using this kind of sophisticated monitoring technology. There may be a European Union investigation into these allegations.Nokia spokesman Ben Roome said: “We are very aware that communications technology can be used for good and ill.” Reporters Without Borders regrets that this awareness is not reflected in the company’s commercial decisions. Nokia and Siemens already provided Iran with software necessary for telecommunications surveillance in 2009. Nokia confirmed that it had sold DPI-based technology to Iran.Thailand and Netfirms (Canada)Netfirms Inc, a Canadian web hosting company that is also based in the United States, provided the Thai government with information that enabled it to identify Anthony Chai, a US citizen of Thai origin, as the person who was anonymously conducting a pro-democracy blog in the Thai language, Manusaya.com. As a result, the Thai authorities were able to arrest and interrogate Chai at Bangkok airport, when he visited Thailand, and even got him to meet with a Thai official after he had returned to California. They also warned him that he would be arrested for lèse-majesté if he went back to Thailand. Chai filed a complaint against Netfirms on 24 August for providing his email and IP addresses to the Thai authorities without his knowledge, and for closing down his blog at their request.China and Cisco (United States)The US computer technology company Cisco Systems has been accused not only of providing China since 2007 with the technology for a censorship system called Golden Shield, used for identifying political dissidents, but also of helping to set up and develop the system. Two complaints have been recently filed against Cisco in the United States: one on 19 May in a court in San Jose, California, by the Falun Gong, a religious movement banned in China, and one in June in a Maryland court by three Chinese netizens – Liu Xianbin, Du Daobin and Zhou Yuanzhi – and 10 other people.Both lawsuits stress the Chinese government’s use of Cisco’s technology to identify online dissidents and the fact that this enabled the authorities to detain and torture them. Cisco has denied any role in Chinese repression in a message posted on the company’s blog by vice-president Mark Chandler. “We have never customized our equipment to help the Chinese government – or any government – censor content, track Internet use by individuals or intercept Internet communications,” Chandler wrote.Nonetheless, Cisco cannot deny providing the Chinese government with security technology including Deep Packet Inspection, which can be used to track down cyber-dissidents. News September 2, 2011 – Updated on August 31, 2016 Companies that cooperate with dictatorships must be sanctionedlast_img read more

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News providers targeted in new wave of violence sweeping Libya

first_img LibyaMiddle East – North Africa June 24, 2020 Find out more to go further For the past month, Libya has been in the grip of some of the worst violence since the 17 February 2011 revolution which led to the overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi. There have been many civilian casualties and those working in the media have not been spared. News Three days earlier, three employees of the satellite station Al-Assima were abducted in Tripoli’s Martyrs’ Square after covering a demonstration protesting against the fighting in the capital. According to one staffer, three black Toyotas without plates seized the crew as they were putting away their equipment.Correspondent Mohamed Abdelrazaq Hussein, cameraman Ahmed Hussein Al-Ulawni and producer Ahmed Mohamed Al-Jihad were taken to an unknown location before being released five hours later in the middle of the night. The TV station said in a statement that the three men were believed to have been held at the Mitiga air base, controlled by Misrata-allied Islamist forces. They were understood to have been tortured and had their heads shaved by their abductors. Since the 17 February Revolution and the overthrow of Gaddafi, many Libyan journalists have been threatened, assaulted, kidnapped and even killed because of their work. The many incidents of violence between the various factions and armed groups have led to an increase in violations of freedom of information and attacks on those working in the media. Some have been forced to leave the country for their own safety and others are thinking about it. Since the start of this year, Reporters Without Borders has recorded more than 60 violations of freedom of information and has given support to 10 journalists in exile. The freedom of information organization calls on all parties taking part in the clashes to halt immediately all attacks on civilians and, more specifically, on those working in the media. Journalists have a vital role to play in the new Libya, especially in building a viable and democratic state with a long-term future.For their part, news organizations and those working for them must show independence and professionalism and remain fully aware of the responsibilities incumbent on them. News providers must bear in mind their essential role in holding official power to account and avoid exacerbating tension and political divisions.RWB is aware of the serious difficulties and many challenges the new Libyan parliament faces but recalls, however, that every government has a duty to protect its civilian population. The organization therefore calls on the Libyan authorities to use all means necessary to put a stop to the attacks on news providers and call a halt to impunity by bringing those responsible for such crimes to justice. August 11, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 News providers targeted in new wave of violence sweeping Libya News LibyaMiddle East – North Africa Since July 13, violent armed clashes have been taking place in Tripoli between the rival Zintan and Misrata militias and their allies for control of the capital’s international airport, among other things.Fierce fighting has been taking place in and around the city of Benghazi between the forces of General Khalifa Haftar and armed Islamist militias such as Ansar Al-Shari’a. On 30 July, Ansar Al-Shari’a managed to capture the base camp of a Haftar-allied special forces unit, whose members were forced to withdraw into the Jebal Akhdar mountains in the east of the country.More than 200 people have been killed and 1,000 wounded since the latest round of violence began, according to health ministry figures. Most of the casualties were caused by the shelling of civilian areas. Amnesty International has categorized these indiscriminate shelling attacks as war crimes. Those working in the media have not been spared in the latest fighting. Three days ago, five staff members of the satellite station Barqa TV, based in Ajdabiya, were abducted on their way back from covering the opening ceremony of the new Libyan parliament. The station’s manager, Faraj Al-Moghrabi, who was also present, said the station’s three cars, carrying the eight members of the crew, were stopped at a checkpoint near the town of Derna, known to be the stronghold of Ansar Al-Shari’a, by militiamen who indicated they were members of the national army under Haftar’s command. According to Al-Moghrabi, however, the militiamen’s clothes and accent rather implied that they were from the opposing camp. They ordered the journalists to get out of their cars at gunpoint. Another of the cars, carrying the station manager, a technician and cameraman, managed to drive off despite coming under fire. Editor Khaled Al-Sibihi, presenter Yunes Al-Mabrouk Al-Moghrabi, reporters Abdelsalam Al-Moghrabi and Yussef Al-Qumudi, and Egyptian video editor Mohamad Jalal were abducted. There has been no news of them since.On 4 August, the “special deterrence force” militia led by the Islamist Abdel Raouf Kara, urged the staff of the government television station Al-Wataniya not to broadcast parliament’s inauguration ceremony. To make sure, they made everyone leave the building. According to two Al-Wataniya employees, the man in charge of the attack, Abdalazim Al-Shahrani, ordered the staff not to report any events surrounding the new parliament but ordered them to support “Operation Libyan Dawn”, launched on 13 July by fighters from Misrata with the aim of seizing control of Tripoli airport from rival militiamen from Zintan. News February 23, 2021 Find out morecenter_img News RSF_en On Libyan revolution’s 10th anniversary, authorities urged to guarantee press freedom December 17, 2019 Find out more Receive email alerts Organisation Six imprisoned journalists to finally appear in court in Istanbul Follow the news on Libya Well-known Libyan journalist missing since his arrest Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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BJP Mumbai Unit President Challenges Mumbai Police Order Making Group Admins Personally Liable For Fake News On Covid-19 [Read Petition]

first_imgNews UpdatesBJP Mumbai Unit President Challenges Mumbai Police Order Making Group Admins Personally Liable For Fake News On Covid-19 [Read Petition] Nitish Kashyap28 May 2020 4:31 AMShare This – xThe President of Mumbai Unit of the Bharatiya Janata Party has filed a writ petition before the Bombay High Court challenging the order passed by DCP (Operations) and Executive Magistrate, Greater Mumbai dated May 23 making group admins personally responsible for any fake news or misinformation disseminated via social media platforms like Whatsapp, Twitter, Facebook, Tik Tok, Instagram etc…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe President of Mumbai Unit of the Bharatiya Janata Party has filed a writ petition before the Bombay High Court challenging the order passed by DCP (Operations) and Executive Magistrate, Greater Mumbai dated May 23 making group admins personally responsible for any fake news or misinformation disseminated via social media platforms like Whatsapp, Twitter, Facebook, Tik Tok, Instagram etc in order to protect people from fake news or incorrect information about Covid-19.Mangal Prabhat Lodha, who is a sitting MLA from Malabar Hill and founder of the Mumbai based Lodha Group contended that the Mumbai Police has issued the order in ‘hot haste’ and called it “arbitrary, unreasonable, colorable exercise of the power to curb fundamental rights of a citizen already reeling under the adverse effects of the pandemic of Covid-19.”The PIL that has been filed through Advocate Hitesh Jain of Parinam Law Associates states-“The impugned order is vague and broadly worded. It is trite law that an order passed by the Executive Magistrate in exercise of powers under Section 144 of CrPC ought to be against specific persons not the general public. However, the text of the impugned order makes no such distinction. Further, any restriction imposed upon rights enshrined under Article 19(2) of the Constitution ought to be ‘reasonable’ and cannot be in the nature of blanket restriction.”The petitioner goes on to state that the general public is not satisfied with the Maharashtra government’s response in curbing the pandemic of Covid-19 citing the rising number of cases in the State which already has the highest number of cases in the country. Moreover, the Mumbai police order has been passed in order to prevent people from criticizing the state government’s inaction during the current situation, the PIL states.Mumbai Police has been issuing and re-issuing the same order since April. The May 23 order which is valid till June 8, states-“There is widespread dissemination of fake news, incorrect information , misinformation and other objectionable content in the form of messages, videos, images, memes, audio clips etc (both edited and self-created) over social media platforms like Whatsapp, Twitter, Facebook, Tik Tok, Instagram etc. Such type of content has been found to have caused panic and confusion among the general public, inciting mistrust towards government functionaries and their actions taken to control the Covid-19 pandemic and also to have created animosity towards various communities.”The petitioner also contends that the impugned order fails the test of proportionality upheld by the High Court in the case of KS Puttuswamy vs Union of India.Thus, the PIL seeks directions to set aside the order passed by Mumbai police as unconstitutional being violative of Articles 14, 19 and 21 of the Constitution.Previously, the same prohibitory order issued by the Mumbai Police on April 10 was challenged by one Pankaj Rajmachikar before the High Court. Justice RK Deshpande had refused to interfere and observed that prima facie the said order has been passed with the objective of protecting people from false or incorrect information about Covid-19.Click Here To Download Petition[Read Petition] Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Delhi Riots- Delhi High Court Reserves Order In Asif Iqbal Tanha’s Appeal Against Rejection Of His Bail

first_imgNews UpdatesDelhi Riots- Delhi High Court Reserves Order In Asif Iqbal Tanha’s Appeal Against Rejection Of His Bail Nupur Thapliyal18 March 2021 2:28 AMShare This – xThe Delhi High Court on Thursday reserved orders in Jamia Millia Islamia student, Asif Iqbal Tanha’s appeal against the rejection of his bail in connection with a case related to larger conspiracy in Delhi Riots that broke out last year. A division bench comprising of Justice Siddharth Mridul and Justice Bhambhani reserved the order. Tanha has challenged an order dated 26th October…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Delhi High Court on Thursday reserved orders in Jamia Millia Islamia student, Asif Iqbal Tanha’s appeal against the rejection of his bail in connection with a case related to larger conspiracy in Delhi Riots that broke out last year. A division bench comprising of Justice Siddharth Mridul and Justice Bhambhani reserved the order. Tanha has challenged an order dated 26th October 2020 dismissing his bail plea who was arrested under the stringent UAPA. Additional Sessions Judge Amitabh Rawat rejected the bail application after prima facie observing that the case was maintainable against Tanha and that he allegedly played an active role in the entire conspiracy. Advocate Siddharth Agarwal appeared on behalf of the accused, Tanha whereas Aman Lekhi appeared on behalf of the State authorities before the Delhi High Court. Case Before The Delhi Court In the FIR 59/2020, which was lodged by Delhi Police in the Delhi riots conspiracy case, a total of 15 people were named and Tanha was one of them. The police claimed that Tanha played an active role in orchestrating the protests against the Citizenship Amendment Act.It was also alleged he is a close associate of Safoora Zargar, Umar Khalid, Sharjeel Imam and others, and thet he is a “key members of anti-CAA protests and subsequent riots in the national Capital”. It was also submitted that Tanha conspired, along with others, to “overthrow the Government” by setting up a chakka jam (road blockade) in Muslim-dominated areas.Police also claimed that Tanha purchased a mobile SIM card by using fake documents and the same was used in planning the chakka jaam, riots etc and it was used to create a WhatsApp group. It was also claimed that the SIM was subsequently provided to another Jamia student and co-accused Safoora Zargar to organise further protests.The Delhi Court observed that there are reasonable grounds for believing that the accusations against the accused Asif Iqbal Tanha are prima facie true, hence, embargo created by Section 43D of UAPA applied for grant of bail to the accused. “There is the freedom to protest available to all the citizens of the country but that is subject to reasonable restrictions. There is also, no manner of doubt that every citizen can hold an opinion about any legislation which they construe as unfair in their understanding. The freedom, and right to protest against any law is available to all the citizens. What actually has to be seen in the context of the present case is whether there was a conspiracy which led to riots under the guise of protest against CAA or not, in terms of the contents of the chargesheet.” The Court observed in its order dismissing his plea.Next Storylast_img read more

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Supreme Court Deprecates Practice Of Passing Adverse Remarks Against Judicial Officers By HC In Judgments

first_imgTop StoriesSupreme Court Deprecates Practice Of Passing Adverse Remarks Against Judicial Officers By HC In Judgments LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK21 March 2021 11:18 PMShare This – xThe Supreme Court deprecated the practice of making adverse remarks by High Courts against judicial officers.A judicial officer who presided Motor Accidents Claims Tribunal had approached the Apex Court against certain observations made personally against her by the High Court of Karnataka. Adverse remarks were made in the judgment in appeal against an order passed by the MACT Judge.”We…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court deprecated the practice of making adverse remarks by High Courts against judicial officers.A judicial officer who presided Motor Accidents Claims Tribunal had approached the Apex Court against certain observations made personally against her by the High Court of Karnataka.  Adverse remarks were made in the judgment in appeal against an order passed by the MACT Judge.”We are in agreement with learned counsel for the appellant that the appellant cannot be condemned unheard. We must notice at the threshold that the language used is extremely strong and the Court should be circumspect in using such language while penning down its order qua judicial officers. We really cannot appreciate the use of this language, whatever may have been the conduct of the appellant.”, the bench comprising Justices Sanjay Kishan Kaul and R. Subhash Reddy observed.The court said that any criticism or observations must be judicial in nature and should not formally depart from sobriety, moderation and reserve.”There cannot be an adverse remark made against a judicial officer without first giving an opportunity to the judicial officer to explain his conduct. In that context, in fact it has been observed that while our legal system acknowledges the fallibility of the Judges and thus, provides for appeals and revisions, the lower judicial officers mostly work under charged atmosphere and are under psychological pressure and do not have the facilities which are available in the High Court”, the bench added.Setting aside such adverse remarks, the bench observed that if the High Court really thinks that there are serious aspects arising in respect of the manner of passing of the judgment by the Tribunal, the High Court on the administrative side may issue a notice to the judicial officer and taking appropriate decision after giving her an opportunity to put forth her stand.”It was in any case open to the Division Bench, if it found that the impugned judgment of the Tribunal had grave errors which casts some doubt on the performance of the officer, to direct the matter to be taken on the administrative side in which case notice would have been issued to the appellant to explain her conduct and she would have got an opportunity to put forth her point of view and then it would have been open on the administrative side, if so advised to whether to take some action or not.”, the bench added.Case: K.G. Shanti vs. United India Insurance Co. Ltd. [CA 929-930/2021]Coram: Justices Sanjay Kishan Kaul and R. Subhash ReddyCounsel: Sr. Adv Basava Prabhu S. Patil, Adv Chinmay DeshpandeCitation: LL 2021 SC 174 Click here to Read/Download OrderRead OrderNext Storylast_img read more

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High-earning graduates will pay more, says Cable

first_imgA proposal for a graduate tax scheme made by Business Secretary Vince Cable has increased the possibility that recommendations submitted by OUSU and the NUS proposal could be implemented as a result of the Browne Review of higher education funding.Cable’s proposal suggests that students should pay for their fees through the tax system, that high-earning graduates pay more than those on lower incomes, and that there should be no up-front tuition fees. Students ‘almost certainly will have to pay more’ said Cable, adding that he had asked Lord Browne to look at the idea of a graduate tax ‘as a priority’. OUSU welcomed Vince Cable’s proposals as ‘the most progressive and the most sustainable answer’ to the question of higher education funding.‘Of course the devil is in the detail of any proposed graduate tax, and Oxford students will not be conned by high-flown rhetoric with no substance’ said President David Barclay. ‘However, this speech has shattered forever the complacent myth that fee rises are inevitable.’Lesley Sims, Oxford University’s Head of the Planning and Resource Allocation, said that Mr Cable’s proposals were ‘fine’, but emphasized that ‘there are many ways in which it can be interpreted – too many people see it as the NUS Blueprint.’ Earlier this year OUSU made its submission to the Browne Review, supporting the NUS Blueprint for a graduate tax. According to the NUS proposal, the collection and distribution of funds would be centralised, and individual fees at the institutional level would be abolished. However, Oxford also made a submission to the Browne Review, in which the university says that ‘we do not support a Graduate Tax, because we do not wish to make the University more dependent on national funding decisions, at a time when we could be taking greater responsibility for developing our own provision and funding arrangements.’ The university’s main proposal was an ‘income-contingent graduate contribution scheme’ in which institutions would have the right to set their own fee level. Although the amount that a student would have to repay would also be linked to earnings, this amount would be decided by each individual university.‘If there is diversity in the university sector, it should be reflected in the fees,’ said Anthony Monaco, Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University. He also warned that ‘the problem with a graduate tax is that graduates could have to pay back amounts much larger than the fee.’The Russell Group, in its own proposal to the Browne Review, also said that is necessary to ‘vary prices from institution to institution’ as well as ‘from subject to subject.’ Following Mr Cable’s speech, Dr Wendy Piatt, Director General of the Russell Group, said that ‘we do not agree that a pure graduate tax would be a better or a fairer system’, arguing that it would lead to overpayment on the part of the highest-earning graduates.OUSU however, has said that variable fees would deter students from lower-income bands from applying, and that a graduate tax is the only scheme that would provide fair access.‘Given Oxford’s history of able candidates being deterred from applying, we are keenly aware of the need for a new system which will allow students from every conceivable background access to a high quality and life-changing education’ said Barclay.‘I hope that Vince Cable’s speech will have a large influence on the Browne review in combating what has until this point seemed an inevitable momentum towards lifting the cap on tuition fees.’The results of the Browne Review are expected to come out in autumn.last_img read more

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Cake sales fall at Finsbury

first_imgFinsbury Food Group has reported an 11% decline in cake sales in the first eight weeks of 2010, as consumers continue to trade down.In its interim results for the 26 weeks to 2 January, 2010, the country’s second-largest cake producer reported an 8% fall in like-for-like cake sales to £65.3m, with an 11% decline in the following eight weeks. The company blamed the downturn on changes in shopping habits caused by the recession, with consumers trading down from Finsbury’s premium cakes to cheaper alternatives and taking advantage of supermarket promotions. However, chief executive John Duffy told BB he was confident the market for own-label value-added cakes would bounce back in the second half of the year.Group revenue at Finsbury for the second half of last year was £82.9m, a fall of 7% (£6.2m) on the previous year, while profit before tax was flat, at £1.8m. Sales in its bread and free-from division rose by 14% to £17.6m.Read the full story in the next issue of British Baker, out 26 March.last_img read more

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