Month: January 2021

Group plans for ‘GameDay,’ service

first_imgThe Student Senate looked ahead to a football weekend and a visit from “College GameDay,” as well as plans to improve the quality of residential and campus life, during its weekly meeting Wednesday. Student body president Brett Rocheleau said he would share more logistical information with the student body in coming days so campus could be prepared for the Stanford game weekend events. “As you all know, ‘College GameDay’ is coming on Saturday,” Rocheleau said. “Everyone’s wondering about tailgating, camping out, etc. Right now the administration is looking for the best place to set up a line. I’ll get more details tonight and send out a report on everything GameDay, what you can and cannot do.” Hall Presidents’ Council co-chair Matt Lynch shared details from the Leprechaun Legion’s GameDay plan. “There’s going to be a pit for 200 to 300 people in front of the stage,” Lynch said. “They’re trying to make it all students, and it would be cool if we could get all 29 dorms to have their flags in there. Posters are allowed too, and they want everyone to wear green.” Before the game weekend begins, Rocheleau reminded the senators about student government’s upcoming presentation with the Board of Trustees. “We present Thursday afternoon, and we’re basically talking about residence hall life like we’ve been discussing,” Rocheleau said. Chief of staff Katie Baker mentioned a new addition to their presentation booklet. “We added pictures of actual dorm rooms to show the discrepancies,” she said. “There are pictures of doubles from Duncan Hall and Morrissey Manor as well as a quad in Pangborn Hall.” With the addition of the group’s newest member, Class of 2016 president Hugh Phelan, the group discussed four resolutions related to residential and campus life. Director of community relations Kelsey Eckenrodge presented a resolution to direct future projects after a recent community summit. “Basically, a couple of Fridays ago, we had the city summit,” Eckenrodge said. “We met in the morning and talked about concerns and ideas for improvement regarding student-city interactions. We have created committees for specific projects to help in these relations. We decided on eight projects to work on this semester.” After the group passed Eckenrodge’s resolution concerning community relations committees, the director of university affairs Michael Masi also introduced two resolutions, both of which the group passed. The first resolution proposed the implementation of hydration stations in DeBartolo Hall. “We passed a resolution very similar to this one already for residence halls last semester,” Masi said. “This one is just recommending that the university provide the funding and put them in DeBartolo Hall.” When asked where the new hydration stations will be located, Rocheleau responded the exact location has not been decided yet. “They want to keep it in a central location, but they don’t want a line to form where everyone’s walking in because that would just add congestion,” Rocheleau said. “Basically, they’re still working on it.” Masi’s second resolution addressed the issue of campus aesthetics. “It came to my attention that statues around campus are looking old and dirty, so our goal has been to clean them up and restore them,” Masi said. “We want to make them look like their original selves again to make campus look good.” Masi said he has contacted the university architect’s office and the Snite Museum after getting complaints from both students and alumni, and he has identified four statues on campus to restore. Walsh Hall senator Veronica Guerrero said she thinks money should be spent on higher priorities such as new buildings or residence halls, but Rocheleau said the money comes from a different budget. “All the money is allocated differently,” Rocheleau said. “There are different groups. This is more land and making campus prettier while money for buildings comes mainly from donations. They’re very separate in the budgeting scheme.” Duncan Hall senator Brendan Bell announced a resolution for director of social concerns Paul John DiGiovanni, which also passed. “The subcommittee for community relations has been working a lot with the South Bend food banks and other organizations, and he thought it would be a good idea to look into cost-effective and healthier ways for people with food stamps to eat,” Bell said. “They’re looking to make a booklet with specific ideas for healthy eating, for good ways to eat healthy fruits and vegetables that they might now know how to work with.” Rose clarified this booklet is meant to be a sort of recipe book to make sure families on food stamps can meet nutritional needs. “Paul is hoping this booklet can be distributed to not only people in the community but also to students,” Bell said. “People in the local community are really excited and want students to get involved with this.”last_img read more

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Lecturer analyzes Latin American economy

first_imgJosé Miguel Insulza, secretary general of the Organization of American States (OAS) presented a lecture titled “Growth, Inequality and Democracy in the Americas” at the Institute for Educational Initiatives on Tuesday.Insulza, one of Chile’s longest serving public ministers, addressed the current economic growth of Latin America and what it signifies for the implementation of democracy in the region.He said the decade between 2002 and 2012 was the period with the largest economic growth for Latin America, a phrase that is key to understanding the economic decline and inequality Latin America currently faces.“We could have made all the improvements in education, in science and technology, diversifying the economy in the decade between 2002 and 2012,” Insulza said. “This is really a challenge for the region today. What do we do with the expectations that have been created? How do we try to carry out the reforms that are pending from the past decade?”Insulza said the 2002-2012 decade presented enormous economic growth partly because of better international trade relations, particularly with China.“Trade between Latin America and China grew from 2002 to 2012, from 4 billion to over 70 billion dollars, and that’s enormous,” Insulza said. “China will become a larger economic partner with Latin America than the United States.“There is no reason why there should be so much poverty and there is no reason why there should be so much inequality. The fact is that our inequality has increased incredibly. It’s very clear that there is a relationship between the health of the economy and the degree to which capitalism is responsible in some way.”Insulza said one of the factors that contributed to income inequality in Latin America was the lower rate of investment in regional production, where consumption has ultimately outpaced the country’s import and export rate.“External investment hasn’t grown, and that is a problem. When wealth increases, wealth in terms of capital and ownership of capital decreases, investments cannot be made,” he said. “Currently, the wealthy classes in Latin America are more willing to buy land or to invest in houses than to invest in products from that region.”Insulza highlighted three problems key to understanding the current crisis in Latin America: income inequality, rising crime rates and the call for legitimate democratic governments.He said crime rates have been proven to correlate with income inequality, with the majority of security forces in several countries influenced by the wealthiest one percent.“Socially, we are faced with a tougher problem. The external conditions for our growth are not there, the internal conditions for our growth are not created and we have been lagging behind. That certainly will affect democracy.” Insulza said. “The interesting thing is that even today, most economists are warming up to the fact that it is not just a problem of social justice, it also a problem of unfairness.“Growth in the economy is not possible unless we correct the tremendous inequality that exists in the country.”Insulza said while democracy in Latin America has improved substantially since the 1990s, Latin America still requires progress and further implementation of democratic governments in several countries.“Citizens are not willing to give obedience in exchange for protection; they are willing to give legitimacy in exchange for citizenship, and I think we are very far from that,” he said.Tags: chile’s public ministers, growth inequality and democracy in the americas, institute for educational initatives, jose miguel insulza, latin america, latin american economy, oas, secretary general of the organization of american stateslast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s celebrates ‘Dia de los Muertos’

first_imgJunior Mariana Davalos said La Fuerza, a student club at Saint Mary’s, decided to celebrate “Dia de los Muertos,” or Day of the Dead, this week even though the celebration actually falls on the first two days of November. Caitlyn Jordan | The Observer Saint Mary’s students celebrate Dia de los Muertos with La Fuerza, a Hispanic cultural club, by decorating candy skulls.La Fuerza’s mission is to educate the community on Hispanic cultures and issues.Davalos, vice president of La Fuerza, said the club hosts a variety of events from year to year, including an annual celebration of Dia de Los Muertos to help Hispanic students share their culture with the rest of Saint Mary’s.“We want to have the same traditions since we’re not at home,” she said. “[Dia de los Muertos] is a very family-oriented celebration, and we want to make represent our [Latina] culture by bringing it to school.”Davalos said her family has their own way of celebrating Dia de los Muertos.“At my house, we have a photo of the Virgin Mary in our entryway and during this time, my mom will put a photo of her mother on a table with fresh flowers,” she said.Starting Wednesday, the group created an “ofrenda,” or altar, in the Student Center Atrium. Davalos said students have the opportunity to add photos of their loved ones to the ofrenda.“In Mexico, people visit cemeteries and decorate graves with flowers and candles, but away from home, we create altars to remember our loved ones,” she said.Wednesday evening, the group hosted a Spanish Mass in Holy Spirit Chapel in Le Mans Hall. Davalos said there will be an altar in the chapel to remind students about the week’s celebrations.Thursday during lunch, students can decorate sugar skulls or make “papel picado,” paper designs to decorate the altar. Davalos said the club bought more sugar skulls this year, after running out of them last year.“Some girls decorate in honor of loved ones that passed away, and other girls just really enjoy decorating them,” she said.A new addition to the traditional “Dia de los Muertos” celebration is the showing of a film, “The Book of Life,” on Friday. Davalos said the film showing is co-sponsored by Student Diversity Board and is an animated love story that provides students with a fun, engaging way to learn about “Dia de los Muertos.”Davalos said it’s important students know that La Fuerza is not exclusive to Latina students.“It’s just interesting to know about other cultures. For us [members of La Fuerza], it’s enriching in a way — we have the chance to explain our culture and be involved with other students and to share a moment together,” she said.Tags: Dia de los Muertos, La Fuerza, saint mary’slast_img read more

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Gregory Crawford named new president of Miami (Ohio)

first_imgGregory Crawford, vice president, associate provost and former dean of the College of Science, was elected president of Miami University (Ohio) on Friday, according to a Notre Dame press release.Over the past year, Crawford led an effort to increase the University’s presence in California, initially in the Bay Area. According to the release, he focused on expanding internship and employment opportunities for Notre Dame undergraduates and recruiting students from leading California high schools.“For six years, [Crawford] was a dynamic leader of the College of Science and, for the past year, he has taken the lead in developing our California initiative,” University provost Thomas Burish said in the press release. “We remain committed to that initiative and, between now and Greg’s departure in July, I will work with him and others on how best to build upon the foundation he has helped to lay.”Crawford served as the William K. Warren Foundation Dean of the College of Science from 2008 to July 2015, according the press release. As dean, he helped found the Department of Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics and launch four new master’s programs. Crawford also led fundraising initiatives for the Warren Family Research Center for Drug Discovery and the Boler-Parseghian Center for Rare and Neglected Diseases.Crawford, a native of Elyria, Ohio, will assume his new position on July 1, according to the release. He earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from Kent State University.“News of Greg’s election as the next president of Miami University is bittersweet,” Burish said in the release. “While we are tremendously pleased that he has this wonderful opportunity to lead a first-rate university, we also are sorry to see him go.”Crawford came to Notre Dame in 2008, leaving his post as dean of engineering at Brown University, where he was a professor of physics and engineering since 1996, according to the release. During his time at Notre Dame, he worked to raise money and awareness for cancer and rare disease research, biking more than 11,000 miles across the country in support of research for Niemann-Pick Type C disease.Tags: College of Science, Dr. Thomas G. Burish, Gregory Crawford, Miami University (Ohio)last_img read more

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University seniors to pursue service opportunities

first_imgThrough ACE Teaching Fellows, a postgraduate program under the Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE), a group of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students in the Class of 2017 will be teaching at various under-resourced schools across the nation after committing themselves to a pillar of Catholic education: service.Since its founding in 1993 by Fr. Timothy Scully and Fr. Sean McGraw, ACE has devoted itself to serving and enhancing Catholic institutions across America, and has inspired and branched 14 service programs that soon-to-be graduates commit to every year, such as Teach for America and the Pacific Alliance for Catholic Education (PACE). As one of the more popular postgraduate service programs at the University, Teaching Fellows enlisted 45 graduating Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students to serve in ACE’s 24th Cohort.Scully said these graduates’ commitment to service work is “a tremendous sign of hope.”“In ACE, we believe that God has made each of the children entrusted to our care for great things,” he said. “The young men and women in this new cohort have so many gifts and experiences to put into the service of their students — so many of whom are on the margins of society.”Last year, the Career Center and Office of Strategic Planning and Institutional Research reported that roughly 7 percent of Notre Dame graduates committed to service post-graduation. These students served at over 50 different organizations in roles pertaining to advocacy, administration, education, healthcare, social services, legal affairs or ministry.Lead postgraduate service coordinator Karen Manier said this year’s class is on track to match this wide range of service.“Postgraduate service is a popular choice for many students, not just those pursuing a career in education,” Manier said. “Over 100 Notre Dame seniors participate in postgraduate service in any given year.”Under the program, ACE teaching fellows will teach subjects they specialize in for two years at their assigned placement. They will also spend a few weeks at Notre Dame this summer undergoing intensive studies intended to prepare them for their teaching roles.Originally drawn in by ACE’s sense of community, senior biology major and poverty studies minor Catherine Wagner interned with ACE her senior year, and committed to Teaching Fellows to explore the possibility of teaching as a long-term vocation. Wagner will be teaching middle school science and religion for grades 6, 7 and 8 at Most Pure Heart of Mary School in Mobile, Alabama, where she said she hopes to help students “realize their full potential.”“There’s something so special about being united with people that have similar ideas and passions as you,” Wagner said. “The framing of my education through a Catholic mindset and Catholic values had a big impact on my life, so I’d like to continue that for other people.”History major and education, schooling and society minor Samuel Jezak learned about ACE through an information session in his dorm, Keenan Hall. Jezak said he thought the program stood out through its emphasis of community in the “fight to provide quality education to everyone.” He will be teaching high school history and social studies at Cristo Rey San Jose in San Jose, California.“ACE was a win-win for me — a way to serve under-resourced communities, as well as receive fantastic training in pedagogy that culminates in a master’s degree in education,” Jezak said. “The cohort is an incredible collection of talent and human capital that will also be there to lift me up when times are challenging while teaching.”As a graduate of a high school that hosted ACE teachers, history major and secondary education minor Itzxul Moreno, a Saint Mary’s senior, said she has known about ACE since high school, where she was inspired by many ACE teachers. She will be teaching fourth grade at St. Philip Neri Catholic School, a Notre Dame ACE Academy in Indianapolis.“As a product of ACE’s efforts in under-resourced Catholic schools, I have always carried its very special mission close to heart,” Moreno said. “I knew I was going to apply to ACE, but was considering various other postgraduate programs, jobs and even business school. Through it all, I realized that nothing brought me more joy than working with students and serving communities in need.”Another graduating intern of the program, mechanical engineering major John Assaf, said he committed to ACE rather than a career in engineering because he believes engineers are charged to make the world a better place, and teaching “perfectly fulfills [that] goal.” Assaf will be venturing to San Antonio to teach high school math at St. Gerard Catholic High School.“In a way we’re disciples, because these kids, these students and these families at the schools we’re going to flat-out need [our help],” Assaf said. “It’s not like we’re going to provide all of it — we can’t — but if we can start to help people with their backs against the wall, then in a way we’re starting to claw towards that goal of helping people, which is what God wanted to try to do always.”Tags: ACE, Alliance for Catholic Education, Class of 2017, Post-graduate jobs, Teaching Fellowslast_img read more

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Alumni Hall rector announces retirement after 41 years in email to Alumni community

first_imgFr. George Rozum, the rector of Alumni Hall, announced his retirement as rector Monday after over four decades at the helm of the dorm.“Because I no longer have the energy and stamina that I believe is required to do a really good job as a rector, arrangements have been made for me to leave Alumni, so that Alumni may have a rector who will do the many more things for the hall that I think should be done, and that I used to do,” Rozum said in the email.Rozum will be retiring so he can better look after his health, he said in the email.“I have loved being rector for you in Alumni, and I would never be rector in any other hall, especially because of great people like you,” he said. “But I now need regular hours of sleep, so that I can maintain my good health, and this job, as wonderful as it is, does not allow for very regular hours.”Rozum said in the email he plans to become a priest-in-residence and will minister to both Pangborn Hall as well as “the University as a whole” next year. After that, he will either move in with the Pangborn women into their new hall, or into Corby Hall after its construction.While he said leaving the Alumni Hall community will be difficult for him, Rozum assured the community that they will left in “good hands.”“All I can say to you is that I will greatly miss you — your faith, your energy, your friendships, but Residential Life will leave you in very, very good hands, because they care so much about every hall,” he said in the email.Tags: Alumni Hall, Fr. George Rozum, Pangborn Hall, rectors, residential lifelast_img read more

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Notre Dame alumnus withdraws from consideration as director of national intelligence

first_imgThis report was updated August 2 at 2:45 p.m.Notre Dame alumnus and congressman John Ratcliffe (R-TX) withdrew from consideration as the next director of national intelligence, President Donald Trump announced Friday in a tweet.“Our great Republican Congressman John Ratcliffe is being treated very unfairly by the LameStream Media,” Trump wrote in his tweet. “Rather than going through months of slander and libel, I explained to John how miserable it would be for him and his family to deal with these people.”Notre Dame alumnus John Ratcliffe withdrew from consideration Friday as next director of national intelligence.Ratcliffe announced he was withdrawing from consideration in a statement provided minutes after Trump’s tweet.The congressman said he “remains convinced” that if he was confirmed, he would have served the country with integrity and objectivity.“However, I do not wish for a national security and intelligence debate surrounding my confirmation, however untrue, to become a purely political and partisan issue,” the statement said, referencing the conversation around his potential appointment. “The country we all love deserves that it be treated as an American issue. Accordingly, I have asked the President to nominate someone other than me for this position.”Trump had announced Ratcliffe as a nominee in a tweet Sunday. If confirmed by the United States Senate, Ratcliffe would have replaced Dan Coats, a former Indiana senator who held the position since March 2017.”I am pleased to announce that highly respected Congressman John Ratcliffe of Texas will be nominated by me to be the Director of National Intelligence,” Trump said in the Sunday tweet. “A former U.S. Attorney, John will lead and inspire greatness for the Country he loves.”According to Ratcliffe’s campaign website and the United States Congress Biographical Directory, he earned a scholarship to Notre Dame and graduated after three years in 1987. He went on to earn his J.D. from Southern Methodist University in 1989.A New York Times profile of the congressman said he was elected to Congress in 2014 after defeating incumbent congressman Ralph Hall in the Republican primary. Ratcliffe, who gained support from the tea party in his initial bid for Congress, drew national attention after he “sharply challenged” former special counsel Robert Mueller at a House Judiciary Committee hearing July 24.Tags: American Politics, Director of National Intelligence, Donald Trump, John Ratcliffelast_img read more

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Student government plans third annual Flick on the Field

first_imgNotre Dame is a school that prides itself on traditions. While some of these trace their roots back decades, one established in recent years is Flick on the Field. This event, which will take place for the third straight year Friday evening, presents a screening of the film “Rudy” on the Notre Dame Stadium jumbotron on the first Friday night of the new school year.Senior Abby Smith and junior Connor Whittle, Student Government’s co-directors of student life, were in charge of planning the event this year. Smith said the screening presents a good way to experience an old Notre Dame tradition in a novel way.“I would simply describe Flick on the Field as the ability for people to experience a Notre Dame tradition in a new way,” Smith said. “It’s cool to watch ‘Rudy,’ it’s cool to be in the stadium, but to bring those two together is a really unique experience and we’re really excited to be doing that for a third year and really solidifying that tradition.”Planning for the event began in April and May, when Smith and Whittle began conferring with administration officials who had helped with the occasion previously.“We definitely tried to plan it a lot earlier than it had been in years past,” Smith said. “I think we’re in a really good position to make it a really successful event on Friday.”While the event is free, students can only gain access to the field if they have a yellow wristband. Wristbands were distributed Thursday night at the Best of Duncan event in Duncan Student Center and will still be available Friday before the event. The movie begins at 7:30 p.m., but gates open at 7 p.m. with some programming before the film.“Before it starts … we’ll do Punt, Pass and Kick on the field,” Whittle said. “I think RecSports is going to be helping us out with that. We’ll also have a DJ.”In addition to RecSports, Student Government is also working with GreeNDot in preparation for the event. Smith and Whittle said the first 300 attendees through the gates will receive a GreeNDot beach towel.“Something new that we’re doing this year is partnering with GreeNDot a little bit, so helping them spread their awareness to students — especially new students,” Smith said.The beginning of the school year often sees a high rate of safety-related incidents, Whittle added, and the collaboration between Student Government and GreeNDot aims to raise awareness of this issue.“They’re really pushing that the first six weeks on campus are really when incidents have a particularly high occurrence, so we’re really happy to be partnering with GreeNDot to really get the message out there for student safety,” he said.The event also presents an opportunity to unite the Notre Dame and South Bend communities, junior Aaron Benavides, Student Government’s press secretary and director of communications, said.“I think one of the great things is it is an excellent opportunity to welcome the South Bend community onto our campus and have them around,” Benavides said. “But it’s also an excellent time for all members of the Notre Dame community — from first years, to all sorts of undergrads and even graduate students and their families as well — to come together and celebrate the beginning of the year in a unique and special way.”Overall, Whittle said he hopes the event serves to get the community excited for football season.“Nothing could get you more excited than actually being on the field and watching ‘Rudy,’” he said.Tags: Flick on the Field, greeNDot, Rudy, Student governmentlast_img read more

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Duncan Hall hosts tower climb in honor of 9/11 first responders

first_imgHaving lived in New York during their childhoods, sophomores Conor Milligan and Patrick Creaven were both directly impacted by the events of 9/11.Creaven’s dad, who lived in New York at the time, watched the plane fly into the south tower and had friends who were killed in the tragedy. Milligan’s family knew a police officer — Ramon Suarez — who died while rescuing people.So the two Duncan Hall residents came together last spring and started planning a new dorm signature event to honor first responders — particularly those who sacrificed their lives in the aftermath of the terrorist attack. On 9/11, this Wednesday, Duncan Hall will host ND 110, a “9/11 Tower Climb,” to raise money for Heart 9/11, a charity founded by New York first responders.CLAIRE KOPISCHKE | The Observer “There’s a lot of talk going on now about how the police are terrible and disrespecting them, but they put their lives on the line every time they go on the clock [and] even if they’re off the clock, because [they] keep our communities safe,” Milligan said.Participants will climb 110 flights of stairs, the number that firefighters had to climb in the Twin Towers. The event will be held in Jordan Hall, and organizers estimate it will take about 45 minutes to complete the 24 laps of the front, south-side staircase which equals 110 flights of stairs.“It’s not a race — it’s in honor of the firefighters,” Milligan said. “Not everyone starts at 5 o’clock. People come in and it takes about 45 minutes, but you come and do it at your own pace.”The event will run from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. with participants staggered in waves of up to 100 at a time. The event took inspiration from Storm the Stadium, an annual University event sponsored by the Office of Military and Veterans Affairs. Milligan and Creaven met with firefighters who said they felt the event was more focused on honoring members of the military and wanted to create an event specifically geared towards recognized first responders.“I know a decent amount of them went to Storm the Stadium but … it’s not for them specifically,” Creaven said. “So for them to have something for them [specifically], they appreciate it a lot.”Milligan said he and Creaven discussed the event with firefighters from the South Bend Fire Department in April and began looking at ways to recognize first responders in particular on campus.”We met with them and sort of asked them, ‘Do you guys feel like an event like Storm the Stadium really accommodates first responders?’” Milligan said. “And they mentioned that, especially in a community like South Bend, there’s sort of a disconnect between the community and first responders, and then also that divide between campus and South Bend. So they were like, ‘Yeah, Storm the Stadium is great, but it’s for military and veterans.’“So a first responder event was something that they really wanted. … We thought this would be a good way to bridge the campus-community divide and sort of unite us with first responders.”About a dozen first responders have already signed up for the event, amongst 55 pre-registered participants. Creaven and Milligan said they hope to have at least 200 participants in order to raise around $2,000 for Heart 9/11.Milligan said the tower climb is the only event of its kind within a two-hour radius of campus. As such, he said he hopes the event will have even more of an appeal in the local area.“The closest one might be in Chicago,” he said. “So, it’d be a good draw to get an event in the Michiana area. And Notre Dame is really good at hosting large events, with football and everything so [it] can very easily tack on something like this.”Creaven and Milligan spent months planning the event, submitting their SAO request during the summer. This is the first year Duncan Hall will host the tower climb. In past years, the dorm considered the Bald and the Beautiful to be its signature event, though the popular event is now run through a club.Milligan said he looks forward to honoring firefighters and first responders at Wednesday’s event, as the community comes together to remember 9/11.“It’s a defining moment for our country,” Milligan said. “A lot of us on campus now were very, very young when it happened, but it shaped our daily lives, so we never forget that it happened.” Participation in the event is free for first responders and costs $15 for other members of the community. Event t-shirts can also be purchased for $15. Registration is available online and at the time of the event.Tags: 9/11, climb, Duncan Hall, honorlast_img read more

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Trump pardons Notre Dame alumnus, 49ers owner

first_imgFormer San Francisco 49ers owner and Notre Dame alumnus Eddie DeBartolo Jr. was granted a full presidential pardon by President Donald Trump for a corruption charge, NBC News reported Tuesday.The corruption case involved Edwin Edwards, the former governor of Louisiana. DeBartolo pleaded guilty for failing to report a felony when he paid Edwards $400,000 to help secure a casino license. He had to pay a $1 million fine and was given two years probation in exchange for his testimony against Edwards. DeBartolo attended Notre Dame as an undergraduate. He is the son of Marie P. Debartolo and Edward J. DeBartolo Sr., in whose honor the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center and DeBartolo Hall were dedicated.Following the charge, DeBartolo was banned from the NFL for a year and ceded control of 49ers to his sister in 2000. The 49ers won five Super Bowls in 14 seasons with DeBartolo as the team’s owner, and he was elected into the NFL Hall of Fame in 2016. The 49ers lost Super Bowl LIV to the Kansas City Chiefs earlier this month.NBC reported former NFL players Jerry Rice, Charles Haley, Ronnie Lott and Jim Brown met with Trump to discuss DeBartolo’s situation. DeBartolo had previously been denied a presidential pardon by former president Barack Obama.“Today is a great day for [DeBartolo],” Rice said in the story. “I’m glad to be here and be a part of that. And you know, it’s just something I’ll never forget. You know, this man, he has done so much in the community, he has done so much in NFL football.”Tags: corruption, Eddie DeBartolo Jr., pardon, President Donald Trump, San Francisco 49erslast_img read more

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