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Classrooms without walls

first_imgWhen Rebecca Pierre was 9, she would have breakfast each morning with local children attending a nearby summer camp. Day after day Rebecca, who had immigrated to South Boston at age 6, showed up at the camp and sat down to eat. Eventually, a senior counselor took Rebecca’s hand, brought her home, and talked to her mother about getting her enrolled.That was the beginning of Pierre’s commitment to, and passion for, the South Boston Summer Urban Program (SUP), a camp operated by the student-run Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA) out of Harvard University.Twenty-one years later, Rebecca is the director of that camp and a rising senior at Northeastern University. “SUP transformed me. It was a vital piece of my life, and a great part of my growth,” she said.Rebecca and co-director Monique Takla, a 2014 graduate of Harvard College, oversee the camp as two of the 1,500 student volunteers who help to keep PBHA running. The South Boston camp enrolls 50 campers a summer. Rebecca’s little brother is one of them.PBHA is the umbrella organization for 83 student-directed programs run by the student volunteers. The association works to meet critical local needs by providing vital resources to the community while helping to nurture public-service leaders. It’s often called “the best course at Harvard” because it provides students with knowledge and experiences that cannot be learned within classroom walls. Its programs serve close to 10,000 low-income people in Boston and Cambridge annually.SUP is a set of 10 student-run local camps, held at 12 sites. There are 11 days camps and an evening program in English as a second language for immigrant teens. The programs are staffed by more than 120 college students from various colleges and universities. The college students live in dorms on Harvard’s campus for the summer.The camps serve more than 900 low-income, at-risk youths ages 6 to 18. The camps last for seven weeks and cost only $120 per child, though no child is turned away because of an inability to pay.The programs provide a safe, supportive environment for children. They teach violence-prevention activities and serve as an avenue to stop summer learning loss. Research consistently shows that students, particularly those from low-income families, risk losing at least two months of literacy and math skills during the summer. The SUP camps work to stop those losses through activities that blend core academic areas with social and emotional development, and increased community awareness and activism.“The campers leave here with a real sense of community,” Pierre said. “A lot of what we do has a community angle. We have many different partnerships. We work with Marian Manor, a nursing facility down the road. We partner with South Boston Grows, which teaches the kids about urban gardens and healthy living, and we are constantly talking about how to make healthy life choices.”The summer programs are structured around curricular, classroom-based enrichment in the mornings and afternoons field trips around Boston.“PBHA’s SUP camps are a win-win for everyone,” said Maria Dominguez Gray, executive director of PBHA. “Campers and families benefit from enriching programming. Our junior teen counselors are engaged in meaningful employment that offers much-needed job and life skills. And the college students learn so much about themselves, about leadership, effective education, program development, and the various challenges facing urban communities. This is all learning that extends far beyond the classroom.”In addition to the camps in Boston and Cambridge neighborhoods, there are three that are subject-based. Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment serves 100 children from Dorchester, Mattapan, and South Boston. Refugee Youth Summer Enrichment serves more than 100 high school students from neighborhoods in Greater Boston. These camps target youths from more than 15 countries who have low English proficiency. The camps have been officially accepted by the Boston Public Schools as alternatives to summer school. The Native American Youth Enrichment Program serves more than 40 students and is the only urban camp in Massachusetts dedicated to meeting the academic, cultural, and social needs of local Native American youths.The Cambridge Youth Enrichment Program serves more than 160 children at three locations. Besides the camp in South Boston, there are also camps serving Chinatown (70 children), the Franklin Field and Franklin Hill housing developments in Dorchester (80 children), Mission Hill (80 children), and Roxbury (80 children). The Keylatch Summer Program serves 80 children living in housing developments in the South End and Lower Roxbury. 18Campers sang and chanted, with the guidance of Halie Olson, as they headed back to the Condon School after a field trip to Harvard Square. 1Halie Olson looks on as Jayden Melo, 7, gets a goodbye kiss from his mother, Carmen, on the first day of summer school at James F. Condon Elementary in South Boston. 13Andy Nova wanted to see the bunny’s whiskers. 11Sergio Lucero Ruiz needed lots of coaxing to even look at a bunny; a patient counselor eased him toward touching the animal. 8Northeastern student, South Boston resident, and camp co-director Rebecca Pierre (right) works with a misbehaving student on the first day. Pierre, who grew up across the street from the camp in South Boston, spent her summers attending SBOS. She lives in Harvard’s Lowell House with the other senior counselors this summer. 14Adonis Boyce stopped to greet the bunny before the class moved on. 7Counselors Sammy Cruz (center, left) and Beto Vargas play “the name game” — an orientation activity that helps students learn each other’s names. 12Students reacted to seeing a chicken. 9Shafique Holloway, 13, contributes to his classroom’s rules. 4Giovanni Ortiz watches as his son, Javier, high-fives senior counselor Halie Olson ’17 on the first day of camp. 15Julia Perez, 8, hugged a chicken at Farrington Farm. 3Jayden Melo (left) and Javier Ortiz warm up when they see that Cameryn Crowley has returned for another summer. Crowley, a camper since age 7, has moved through the ranks and now works as a junior counselor at South Boston Outreach Summer. 10Campers attend field trips like this one to the Farrington property in Lincoln, Mass., where they were introduced to animals they’d never seen before. 17Hands-on enrichment activities empower youth like Andy Nova, 8, who dared to come face-to-face with a chicken held by Jayden Melo, 7. 2Jaheim Peeple, 12, looks ambivalent on day one of camp. Run by Harvard’s Phillips Brooks House Association, the camp draws students from three public housing developments in Southie, and no child is ever turned away because of an inability to pay. 16The campers fed leaves to goats. 5Adonis Boyce (left) and Andy Nova are happy to see Cameryn Crowley, a junior counselor this year. The campers, ranging in age from 6 to 13, all meet in the cafeteria for breakfast each morning. 6Jonathan Pierre, 12, lists the rules his class has decided collaboratively to follow. Students come from one of three public housing developments in South Boston: Old Colony, Mary Ellen McCormack, and West Broadway. 19An especially exuberant Julia Perez sang as she walked along a Southie street. 20Camping can wear you out! Angelica Suazo, 9, gets a ride from camp co-director Rebecca Pierre (right).last_img read more

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Capture the small business market: Digital steps to take now

first_img 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Every small business has unique needs, and determining what they need from their financial institutions can be difficult. However, identifying your small business customers and providing them with the right solutions – at the right time – can help you attract and keep business accounts as they grow from a startup garage office to a high-rise boardroom.Small businesses are an important segment for financial institutions of all sizes, representing a significant opportunity for diversified earnings that grow as the small business grows. Commercial customers look to their financial institutions to deliver the expertise, experience and specialized solutions businesses need to succeed.What can your financial institution do to capture a greater share of this important market?Identify Small Business CustomersAn important determination for financial institutions is whether to serve small businesses through retail or treasury lines of business. Either option can be successful with the right set of offerings, but one thing is certain: You can’t build customer relationships if you haven’t identified them. continue reading »last_img read more

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Holder hoping for Test dominance

first_img(CMC) – West Indies Test captain Jason Holder says he hopes to leave a legacy of being one of the greats in the longest format, but is cognizant of the need to sustain very high standards if he is to achieve that goal.Already, the 28-year-old has become one of the contemporary faces of the Test format, and is currently the number one all-rounder in the International Cricket Council (ICC) rankings.And though pointing out he enjoyed all three formats, Holder said he placed considerable emphasis on Test cricket which remained the measure of all cricketers.“Test cricket is the ultimate game for me,” Holder told TalkSport’s Cricket Collective.“Growing up there was only Test cricket and 50-over cricket, to be fair, and you always were marked and critiqued on your performance in Test cricket – you became a legend of the game through Test cricket.“I don’t think many people would stand out as being legends of the game via the one-day route but obviously with the advent of T20 cricket, there is a debate now with white-ball versus red-ball cricket but still I think red-ball cricket would take precedence, and I just want to be remembered for being a great Test match cricketer and not only a great Test match cricketer per se but a great cricketer.“In order to do that, you’ve got to be consistent, and more than likely every time you step on the park you’re being scrutinised and marked. So for me it’s about keeping my standards high and making sure I’m doing everything in my power to win cricket games for whoever I’m representing.”Holder shot to stardom last year when he struck a monumental unbeaten 202 to propel West Indies to a crushing victory over England in the opening Test at Kensington Oval last January.In reaching triple figures for the third time in his career, he became the first West Indies number eight to score a doubl-century in Tests and the first Windies captain since Brian Lara in 2004, to notch a double against England.Only the previous year, fast bowler Holder had captured 33 wickets at an average of 12.39 – the best average in a calendar for nearly a century. He currently averages 32 with the bat from 40 Tests and 26 with the ball.Though Holder averaged 49 with the bat and took 20 wickets at 17 apiece in Tests last year, he believes there was still much improvement needed.““I think if I look at it from a holistic point of view of all three formats, I don’t think it was my best year,” he explained.“I try to mark myself pretty hard and try to set pretty high standards as well. So coming off of 2018 where I felt I had the best year of my cricketing career, I think I probably fell back a little in 2019 but it’s a new year in 2020 – 2019 is behind us and for me it’s just getting myself attuned back to playing international cricket.“Hopefully we can get some Test cricket going again. I think Test cricket is the best way to get some cricket under your belt – you get some overs under your belt, you get time to spend in the middle and it’s not rushed. That puts my cricket in good stead.”last_img read more

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Loeta Stocking: June 12, 1916 – Jan. 2, 2014

first_imgLeota Chubb StockingLoeta Stocking passed away at home with family on Jan. 2, 2014, after a stroke the previous day. At 97, she lived a long life full of love and service.Born June 12, 1916, in Baxter Springs, Kan., to James Orr Chubb and Ida Mae Chubb, Loeta was the 10th of 12 children who grew up on a farm. She loved being part of a large family and was raised on strong Christian values of love, hard work, clean living and service. The Chubb family raised all the food they needed and sold eggs, dairy products and wheat. Weekends were dedicated to the Methodist Church and church social activities.She attended college in Pittsburg, Kan., where she met her future husband, Frank Stocking, at a Methodist student event. They were married in 1941 at the Blue Mound Methodist Church in Baxter Springs.During World War II, while Frank served as a naval officer on a destroyer in the Pacific, she lived on the family farm in Baxter Springs with their first daughter.In 1951, with three young daughters, Loeta and Frank moved to Stanford Village, Calif., where Frank worked toward his Ph.D. at Stanford University on the GI Bill.The family moved to Lodi, Calif., in 1954 where Loeta dedicated herself to family, church and community. She created a loving, supportive home and taught her children the importance of respect, honesty and hard work. At church, Loeta was a member of the United Methodist Women and served as district officer. Frank and Loeta were also youth group leaders. Outside the church, Loeta was active in PTA, Campfire Girls as a troop leader and as a member of PEO — a sisterhood to advance education for women. In her 50 years of membership in PEO, she served in every office and worked diligently toward the mission of empowering women through education.Once their daughters graduated from high school, they left Lodi to live in San Rafael, Castro Valley, and finally retired in Napa in 1980.In Napa, Loeta became active in the local chapter of PEO and the Napa United Methodist Church. She was the type of person who would quietly do whatever needed to be done. In her service to the church, she was just as happy in a supportive role as in a position of leadership. She helped with the church newsletter, worked on committees and served as an officer for United Methodist Women’s Redwood Chapter.In retirement, Frank and Loeta traveled around the world with friends. Loeta also enjoyed getting together with her friends to play bridge, bowl and go out to eat.As a wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, Loeta joyfully supported and served her family. Not only did she make all the clothes for 3 daughters from childhood through high school, she sewed dozens of costumes for her grandchildren’s theater productions. She baked thousands of pies, hundreds of thousands of cookies, attended countless sporting events and performances, and created thousands of meals where her family gathered in love and fellowship.For her family, Loeta had steadfast, unconditional love and served as an example of how to live a life full of joy and integrity. She always listened patiently, never spoke an unkind word and greeted everyone with a loving smile and sparkling blue eyes. Her radiant spirituality touched the hearts of everyone she met. Through changing times, she supported the choices of her children and grandchildren with enthusiasm and admiration. She had an open heart and mind to different ways of thinking and living. Everyone who met her, even if it was just once, loved her because she truly accepted people as they are.Loeta is survived by her two sisters, Esther Hood of Mission Viejo and Lorna Ferguson of Baxter Springs, Kan.; three daughters, Suzanne (Gary) Love of Modesto, Shirley (Mark) Stickney of Assisi, Italy, and Marsha (Richard) Niemann of Napa; grandchildren, Melanie (Mark) Hildebrandt, Elyse Niemann and Mark (Erik Batz) Niemann; step-grandchildren, Tracey, Brian and Karin Love; and three great-grandchildren, Michael and Morgan Hildebrandt, and Wesley Niemann-Batz. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, Jan. 18, at 11:30 a.m. at the Napa First United Methodist Church.Contributions may be made to a PEO educational scholarship fund honoring Loeta, to the Napa Valley Hospice or to the First United Methodist Church of Napa.last_img read more

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Amb. Elder on 2017: ‘Smooth Transition Part of Mature Democracy’

first_imgU.S Ambassador Christine Elder says the US will support a smooth transition in Liberia’s 2017 elections, and called on Liberians to be prepared for transparent elections.“The peaceful transition in my country despite people’s feeling is an enduring tradition. This is something we all wish for Liberia and we are confident it will happen because this is part of the process of a mature democracy,” Ambassador Elder said.She urged young people to respectfully and peacefully engage the political process, saying that that way, they can ensure that their voices are not just heard but heeded. She made the statement yesterday at a program marking the official opening of the Young Political Leadership School (YPLS) in Monrovia. The school operates under the guidance of NAYMOTE, a partner for democratic development that promotes citizens’ understanding of democratic processes and the long-term benefits of their participation in these processes. Established in 2001 by student leaders and activists, the institution has been one of the leading grassroots organizations promoting democracy, peace building, human rights and civic engagement in Liberia. However, Ambassador Elder said the fact that young people form the majority in Liberia is an indication that they will have a say in the political process, adding that their say must be respectful or peaceful.Ambassador Elder told the over 100 students that the skills gained during the course will allow them to walk through life with pride.“The tool of leadership you are sharpening and acquiring this week will be with you in every walk of life. Until you are in that category of the elderly, the tool you are going to learn about – building consensus and reaching a common goal – are the two marks of success,” Ambassador Elder said.For his part, the United Nations DSRSG for Peace Consolidation in Liberia, Yacoub El Hillo, stressed the important role young people have to play in the upcoming elections, which entails ensuring that the 2017 elections end peaceably. “The strength in your number is an opportunity, but it also has a responsibility to ensure that the election is peaceful and produces an outcome that all Liberians can remain proud of,” El Hillo said.Yesterday’s opening session was also attended by Sweden’s Ambassador to Liberia, Lena Nordström.The YPLS training focuses on the campaign process, public speaking, citizen engagement, transformational leadership development, grassroots campaign organizing, and campaign communications, including digital media campaigning.The training serves as the third semester of the YPLS program. It brought together students from across the 15 counties, among them university students, representatives of youth-oriented organizations, young candidates, professionals and political fanatics that are passionate about improving democracy and electoral politics through effective youth leadership and participation.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Fishing the North Coast: Winter steelhead season coming to a close

first_imgLast weekend’s storms brought a little more rain than expected, with enough falling to keep the majority of the coastal rivers high and off color leading into the final week of steelhead season. As of Wednesday, only the Smith, Chetco, and the very upper reaches of the South Fork Eel were green. And it looks like those are the only rivers that will fish prior to the season closing after Saturday. The South Fork Eel could fish down to the Miranda area on Saturday if it drops as predicted.As we …last_img read more

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Work with us to go digital: Carrim

first_img30 September 2013Communications Minister Yunus Carrim has called on the broadcast industry to work with the government in speeding up the implementation of South Africa’s migration from analogue to digital TV broadcasting.South Africa was originally meant to have completed migration from analogue to digital signals in November 2011. Currently, the SABC’s channels are being broadcast via outdated analogue signals.Experts say the delays in the migration process are costing the South African economy. Digital broadcasting is far more efficient, allowing for better picture and sound quality.“Government is on course and we just want to put pressure on the relevant partners,” Carrim told a business briefing organised by the New Age and SABC on Monday.“We brought all public broadcasters on board and told them to choose a facilitation team. We are in the midst of those negotiations, and we are not moving as fast as we would like,” he said.In August 2008, the South African government took a decision that it would subsidise the set-top boxes needed to convert analogue to digital signals for five-million of the poorest South African television households.The notion of set-top box control was subsequently born in order to protect the state’s investment in subsidised set-top boxes, to prevent set-top boxes acquired using taxpayers’ money from leaving the country.Carrim said the government’s main concern was to protect the electronic industry and jobs.“We also want to ensure that new entrants don’t use any government subsidies to create pay TV, on the one hand, and also there are high levels of monopoly and concentration in the industry. We want to give space to the emerging entrepreneurs, especially in the set-top boxes market.”Carrim said the world was undergoing a digital revolution and that he wanted the country’s information and communication technology (ICT) to be ready for this. “This revolution is transforming the nature of our communication.”He said his predecessor as minister, Dina Pule, had earlier this year launched an ICT policy review framing paper which sought clarity on the vision for the country’s communication sectors.A 22-member ICT policy review panel would assess the policy for expanding the sector, he said, adding that it was crucial that ICT played a role in reducing, not increasing, equality in South Africa.“Help us, and we will actually work hard to make this country be the great country it is and showed itself to be in 1994, 2010 and whole lot of other events.”Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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Women of excellence: Pontsho Manzi, working for female unity and empowerment

first_imgAs part of her image-consulting business, Pontsho Manzi works with women to build their self-esteem through empowering workshops on image management.Businesswoman, globally recognised inspirational speaker, facilitator, coach and image consultant Pontsho Manzi has a cause close to her heart: women empowerment, female unity and the forging of an authentic sisterhood that encompasses confidence, self-esteem and mutual upliftment without competition or envy.A qualified HR practitioner by training, Manzi is executive chair and CEO of Botlhokwa Group, the holding company for Recrutrain, FabImage and Bonisa Media. She is also an author, the founding editor and publisher of Fabulous Woman magazine, and the creator of South Africa’s first inspirational diary for women, Diary for Fabulous You.Passionate about female empowerment, youth development and leadership, Pontsho is also the founder of the non-profit Fabulous Girls Foundation and FabWoman Awards.In 2013 Pontsho realised there were no awards to recognise the ethical values embodied in female empowerment and unity. So she launched the Fabulous Woman Awards to celebrate the foundational principles of ethical womanhood. These are first awards in South Africa that recognise both girls and women in an effort to spread the spirit of sisterhood and cross-generational bonding to all of the country’s women.On the professional side, in 2004 Pontsho formed Recrutrain, an HR consulting and training company that delivers innovative staffing and training solutions to both private and public sector organisations in South Africa and the SADC region. During her early years of recruiting and training she saw a need to link her business with image consulting, as many candidates consulted her for advice on self-image and image management.As part of the image consulting business, she identified a need to work with women and build their self-esteem through empowering workshops on image management.The feedback from workshops propelled her to delve into the image consulting business and she in 2006 she qualified as an image consultant with the Image Academy of South Africa, a member of the Institute for Colour and Image Consultants for Men and Women in California, USA.With her business acumen, Pontsho launched FabImage in 2007 as a separate company to offer image consulting services to companies and individuals in South Africa and the SADC region. She has delivered talks to organisations and businesses that include GIBS Business School, MTN, MultiChoice, HPCSA, Old Mutual, SASRIA, Kumalo Green, Sasol, MAN, Transnet, the Department of Labour, Vodacom and Cell C.In 2009 Pontsho founded the non-profit FabGalz Foundation, with the aim of empowering young women and girls. Despite a demanding business schedule, she still coaches girls on character building, leadership skills, self-esteem, personal branding and impression management throughout South Africa. She sits on the board of VK Foundation and Young Women in Business Forum.In 2011 she created and launched an annual inspirational diary for women called Dairy for Fabulous You, produced by her newly formed publishing company, Bonisa Media. This was Manzi’s bold foray into the media world and another platform to discuss important issues that concern women.The response from women whose lives she had touched through the diary was overwhelmingly in support of a more frequent publication. So in 2012 Pontsho launched Fabulous Woman Magazine to offer inspiration to women on a quarterly basis, and was amazed by the reach the magazine gave her in her quest to address women’s issues.Through both the diary and magazine, Pontsho has come full circle back to her original purpose to encourage dialogue among women and strive for a cause close to her heart: women empowerment, women’s unity and the forging of an authentic sisterhood.A devoted Christian and philanthropist, Pontsho scooped two awards at the 2014 DTI South African Premier Business Awards: Young Entrepreneur Award and Play Your Part Award.She was also a finalist in the 2014 Women for Africa Awards: International Media Woman Category. In 2011, she was the Winner of Anne Dreyer Rising Star Award, and in 2012 a nominee for South African Most Influential Women and the Shoprite Woman of the Year Award in the Heroine Category. Pontsho was also a finalist in the Heroine Category of Feathers Awards 2013.She has featured on SABC 3, ETV, CNBC Africa, Good Morning Africa, SAfm, Radio 2000, Kaya FM and many more, and been profiled in print media publications at home and abroad.last_img read more

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Facebook Phone’s “Home” App Leaks Ahead Of Launch

first_imgTags:#Android#Facebook#smartphones#social networking What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … dan rowinski Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfacescenter_img Related Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology The so-called “Facebook Phone” will be the big news this week. As with many highly anticipated product launches, some believable rumors are filtering out ahead of the official announcement. In this case, the hottest rumors suggest the Facebook Phone will indeed be a “home screen skin” on top of a HTC Android device. Facebook Home APKTech blog Android Police got its hands on the Android Package File (APK) that supposedly shows what the Facebook phone is going to look like and what kind of features it is going to have. Dubbed “Facebook Home,” the file shows a skin for a HTC device as well as a standalone app that will be available through the Android Google Play app store.The phone itself looks like it will be a mid-level HTC device with a 4.3-inch screen, Android Jelly Bean (version 4.1.2), a 5-megapixel back camera and a 1.6-megapixel front camera. Code named “HTC Myst.” the whole thing looks very similar to the long line of mediocre devices that HTC released through 2011 and into 2012.The APK shows that the device is running HTC’s Sense skin, version 4.5. HTC just released a new iteration in Sense 5 that will ship with its new flagship HTC One smartphones. The HTC skin should not matter, though, as the Facebook APK essentially creates a Facebook home screen designed to push users to Facebook services like Messenger and contacts. Not Just A PhonePerhaps even more important, It looks like any user that wants to create the Facebook Home experience on their Android devices will be able to. Part of the APK is integration for Samsung’s Touchwiz skin, meaning that the app/home screen will be available outside of the dedicated HTC “Myst” device.Facebook is well aware that it does not need a dedicated smartphone to compete with the likes of Apple, Google, BlackBerry and Microsoft. Its greatest strength has been to be one of the apps that is absolutely necessary on all of those devices. If the “Myst” device is just a proof of concept running a tightly integrated Facebook experience, the social giant can move horizontally through the Android ecosystem and give users the same experience without having to actually buy a “Facebook Phone.” In the end, that’s likely a much stronger position for the social networking giant.Image: Facebook group chat from Facebook Mobile. last_img read more

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