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Kurdish journalist gets 11-year prison sentence, Tehran daily closed for criticising Ahmadinejad

first_img Reporters Without Borders firmly condemns the 11-year prison sentence imposed on Kurdish journalist Mohammad Sadegh Kabovand on 22 June for “activity against national security.” The organisation has also learned that the daily Tehran Emrooz was closed on 21 June, a few days after running several articles criticising President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s economic record while mayor of Tehran.“The authorities have no scruples about using unfair trials to convict journalists on trumped-up charges,” Reporters Without Borders said. “No consideration was given to Kabovand’s poor health, either. This especially severe sentence is a message to all those who do not kowtow to the regime, especially in the Kurdish northwest. The decision to close Tehran Emrooz was taken without referring to any court. President Ahmadinejad uses government commissions to settle his political scores.”The former editor of Payam-e Mardom-e Kurdestan, a weekly closed down in 2005, Kabovand received his 11-year sentence from a Tehran revolutionary court for creating a human rights organisation in Iran’s Kurdish region. Since his arrest in July 2007, he has been held in Tehran’s Evin prison, where he spend the first five months in solitary confinement.Despite his health problems, Kabovand was unable to taken advantage of a provisional release order prior to his trial because his family was unable to raise the exorbitant bail that was demanded – 150 million toumen (145,000 euros).Kabovand suffered an acute dizzy spell in his cell on 19 May and his wife, who visited him the day before his sentence was pronounced, told Reporters Without Borders he continues to have periods of dizziness and headaches against which the medicine he is being given in prison is having no effect. “This verdict shows how the authorities persecute journalists and human rights activists in Iran,” she said.Kabovand’s lawyers, Nemat Ahamadi and Mohammad Sifzadeh, protested vehemently against the sentence, describing it as “political.” They also condemned the court’s decision to hold the trial behind closed doors.Tehran Emrooz is owned by current Tehran mayor Mohammed Baqer Qalibaf, who plans to run against Ahmadinejad in next year’s presidential election. It was closed by the Commission for Press Authorisation and Surveillance, an offshoot of the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance, after publishing a detailed report mocking Ahmadinejad’s economic record while mayor from 2003 to 2005. The newspaper’s printer was summoned by a court the day after the article came out to answer to charges of “printing images and editorial content insulting to the president” and “spreading lies with the aim of upsetting public opinion.” The newspaper was forced to publish an official apology, acknowledging that the criticism had not been “moderate.” June 24, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Kurdish journalist gets 11-year prison sentence, Tehran daily closed for criticising Ahmadinejad On the same subject: Organisation Iran is stepping up pressure on journalists, including foreign journalists, in run-up to election Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists June 9, 2021 Find out more June 11, 2021 Find out more IranMiddle East – North Africa IranMiddle East – North Africa Help by sharing this information News Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 March 18, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on Iran News RSF_en Reporters Without Borders firmly condemns the 11-year prison sentence imposed on Kurdish journalist Mohammad Sadegh Kabovand on 22 June for “activity against national security.” The organisation has also learned that the daily Tehran Emrooz was closed on 21 June, a few days after running several articles criticising President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s economic record while mayor of Tehran. 20.05.2008 – Ailing journalist unable to pay bail, held for more than 10 months to go further News Receive email alertslast_img read more

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Authority Seeks Costs and Funds for New Low-Income Housing in Ocean City

first_imgThe senior units at Bay View Manor at Sixth Street and West Avenue and the parking lot where a new building could be built.The Ocean City Housing Authority continues to explore the possibility of expanding and rebuilding its low-income housing units in Ocean City.An Authority subcommittee will meet on Thursday (Jan. 22) with representatives of Pennrose, a Philadelphia-based property management company, as it seeks answers to a couple basic questions: What would it cost? And where would the money come from?“The onus is on them to show us how they can accomplish that,” said Scott Halliday, a member of the Housing Authority redevelopment subcommittee along with Edmond Speitel and Chairman William Woods.The Housing Authority, operates under the auspices of the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and currently administers 20 Peck’s Beach Village units on the north side of Fourth Street (between Simpson and West avenues) for senior citizens and 40 units on the south side of Fourth Street for families, along with senior housing at Bay View Manor that includes 61 units in a five-story building at Sixth Street and West Avenue.The Housing Authority hopes first to add a new building on an Authority-owned parking lost adjacent to Bay View Manor.Housing Authority Executive Director Alesia Watson said the new building would have to include at least 20 units — enough to house the seniors that would be displaced if the homes at Peck’s Beach Village were ever rebuilt.The Housing Authority hired Pennrose for its expertise in securing funding and financing.Pennrose is working to help the Housing Authority secure a $6 million to $7 million federal Community Development Block Grant for housing authorities affected by Superstorm Sandy. Watson said Ocean City applied for the funding more than a year ago, and she reported Tuesday that she’d like to schedule a “face-to-face” meeting with the grant administrators in February.The company is seeking competitive Low-Income Housing Tax Credits that encourage private investment in affordable housing.The Housing Authority also hopes to partner with the City of Ocean City and potentially use some of the $2.1 million in development fees that the city has been required to collect for affordable housing initiatives.Representatives from the city will attend the Thursday meeting with Pennrose.The Housing Authority also voted unanimously Tuesday to authorize the subcommittee to negotiate an agreement with Pennrose for “the expansion and redevelopment of Bay View Manor and Peck’s Beach Village.” The agreement would expand Pennrose’s role in any potential redevelopment project.The Housing Authority meets only bi-monthly, and it wanted to empower the subcommittee to act in the interim.Housing Authority Solicitor Charles Gabage suggested that the subcommittee should consider making the City of Ocean City a party to any agreement if the city contributes to the redevelopment._____Sign up for free daily news updates from Ocean City._____The construction of a new building at Bay View Manor would be the first step in a project that could include the building of 122 new elevated units to replace the 60 flood-prone units of the existing Peck’s Beach Village.The units are rented to low-income residents at low rental rates — with preference given to veterans, the disabled and existing Ocean City residents.Tuesday’s meeting also included the re-election of Woods as chairman of the Housing Authority and of Stu Sirott as vice chairman.last_img read more

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