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Too many charities failing to show public benefit in reports, says Commission

first_img Advertisement Too many charities failing to show public benefit in reports, says Commission Melanie May | 21 December 2018 | News  332 total views,  2 views today  333 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis20 Quality and transparency in charity accounts has fallen with only 70% of trustees’ annual reports and accounts meeting the Charity Commission’s basic benchmark of user requirements, it has said.According to the Commission’s ‘Public reporting review’, this has fallen from last year’s 74%. The quality benchmark was based on recent research into trust in charities which found that ‘ensuring a reasonable proportion of donations make it to the end cause’ and ‘making a positive difference to the cause they work for’ were the most important factors driving public trust and confidence in charities.To test how well charities were meeting this benchmark, the Commission scrutinised a random sample of 105 charity accounts submissions, covering accounting years ending during the 12 months to 31 December 2016, and assessed these against public expectations and public benefit reporting requirements.The main reasons why accounts did not meet the Commission’s basic benchmark were failure to evidence that they had been subject to independent scrutiny by an auditor or independent examiner, as required by law, and / or not providing meaningful information about their charity’s purposes or the activities carried out to achieve those purposes.Only 52% met the public benefit reporting requirements, although this is a 1% increase on last year.The reviewers looked for evidence of some reflection on the difference that the charity’s activities had made. Positive examples of compliance included explaining why the trustees believed that the charity’s activities provided public benefit; explaining who had benefitted from what the charity had done, whether a particular group of beneficiaries or the wider public; and explaining the impact of what the charity had done, such as examples of how the charity’s services had led to improvements in people’s lives.The regulator has provided guidance to all trustees included in the reviews that did not meet its expectations. Support to assist trustees and independent examiners on the preparation and scrutiny of reports and accounts is also available on GOV.UK.Nigel Davies, Head of Accountancy Services at the Charity Commission said:“The public want and deserve to know how charities spend their money so this deterioration in the quality of accounts is of serious concern. The trustees’ annual report and accounts are a key way to build confidence among supporters, so many charities are clearly missing an opportunity.“I would urge those charities that find reporting difficult to take advantage of the pro-forma reports and accounts available on our website.We also need to see a step-change in trustees’ attitudes to public benefit reporting. It is disappointing that nearly half of charities fail to explain the activities they undertake and the impact they have. We want to see charity thrive, so charities must be clearer about who they help and what difference they are making.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis20 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Tagged with: annual report Charity Commissionlast_img read more

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New blood test can detect wide range of cancers

first_img Blood biopsies offer early warning of cancer’s return Editor’s Note: Enrollment in the PATHFINDER study is temporarily suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic.In a study involving thousands of participants, a new blood test detected more than 50 types of cancer as well as their location within the body with a high degree of accuracy, according to an international team of researchers led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, a Harvard affiliate, and the Mayo Clinic.The results, published online today by the Annals of Oncology, indicate that the test — which identified some particularly dangerous cancers that lack standard approaches to screening — can play a key role in early detection of cancer. Early detection can often be critical to successful treatment.Developed by Grail, Inc., of Menlo Park, Calif., the test uses next-generation sequencing to analyze the arrangement of chemical units called methyl groups on the DNA of cancer cells. Adhering to specific sections of DNA, methyl groups help control whether genes are active or inactive. In cancer cells, the placement of methyl groups, or methylation pattern, is often markedly different from that of normal cells — to the extent that abnormal methylation patterns are even more characteristic of cancer cells than genetic mutations are. When tumor cells die, their DNA, with methyl groups firmly attached, empties into the blood, where it can be analyzed by the new test.“Our previous work indicated that methylation-based tests outperform traditional DNA-sequencing approaches to detecting multiple forms of cancer in blood samples,” said Dana-Farber’s Geoffrey Oxnard, co-lead author of the study with Minetta Liu of the Mayo Clinic. “The results of this study suggest that such assays could be a feasible way of screening people for a wide variety of cancers.”In the study, investigators used the test to analyze cell-free DNA (DNA from normal and cancerous cells that had entered the bloodstream upon the cells’ death) in 6,689 blood samples, including 2,482 from people diagnosed with cancer and 4,207 from people without cancer. The samples from patients with cancer represented more than 50 cancer types, including breast, colorectal, esophageal, gallbladder, bladder, gastric, ovarian, head and neck, lung, lymphoid leukemia, multiple myeloma, and pancreatic cancer. Tests that look for hundreds of tumor mutations may detect residual disease in patients after treatment Related Chan School’s Rebbeck highlights cancer’s complex picture Drop in cancer deaths lifts U.S. life expectancy The overall specificity of the test was 99.3 percent, meaning that only 0.7 percent of the results incorrectly indicated that cancer was present. The sensitivity of the assay for 12 cancers that account for nearly two-thirds of U.S. cancer deaths was 67.3 percent, meaning the test could find the cancer two-thirds of the time but a third of the time the test returned a negative result. Within this group, the sensitivity was 39 percent for patients with stage I cancer, 69 percent for those with stage II, 83 percent for those with stage III, and 92 percent for those with stage IV. The stage I-III sensitivity across all 50 cancer types was 43.9 percent. When cancer was detected, the test correctly identified the organ or tissue where the cancer originated in more than 90 percent of cases — critical information for determining how the disease is diagnosed and managed.“Our results show that this approach to testing cell-free DNA in blood can detect a broad range of cancer types at virtually any stage of the disease, with specificity and sensitivity approaching the level needed for population-level screening. The test can be an important part of clinical trials for early cancer detection,” said Oxnard, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.The study was funded by Grail, Inc. As part of further validation research, Dana-Farber has joined a multi-center clinical trial of the test. The PATHFINDER study intends to enroll about 6,200 participants across the U.S. Participants in the study will have the results of the test communicated to them.last_img read more

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Old or new? Gold Coast beach house offers best of both worlds

first_img4 Bolton Street, KirraWith four bedrooms upstairs and multiple living areas on the ground floor, Mr McLennan said it was an ideal family home.Standout features include a home theatre, sunken and enclosed sunroom, an entertainment deck with servery window from the kitchen as well as a pool with water feature and separate heated spa.But it was the home’s position that attracted the O’Briens to the property.It is within walking distance of the beach, cafes and restaurants, and Southern Cross University while major shopping centres and the Gold Coast airport are within a five-minute drive.“They liked the position and everything there,” Mr McLennan said. 4 Bolton Street, Kirra 4 Bolton Street, Kirra“They bought the property and lived in the little house at the front then built the big house at the back,” Mr McLennan said.The original residence has a combined living, kitchen and dining area that opens onto a deck as well as two bedrooms and a study.It has been well maintained over the years but the O’Briens have renovated it to give it a modern style. “They just use that for family and guests now,” Mr McLennan said.The double storey house behind it is much larger. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa18 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago4 Bolton Street, Kirracenter_img 4 Bolton Street, KirraA FRESH lick of paint and some tender love and care has transformed this Kirra home into a coastal paradise.Claudia and Gary O’Brien bought the property at 4 Bolton St in 2004.Back then, only the street-front half of the property existed.RBR Property Consultants principal Lenny McLennan said the couple, who now lived overseas, built the other half about 10 years ago. 4 Bolton Street, Kirralast_img read more

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King’s century hands T&T third straight win

first_imgST JOHN’S, Antigua (CMC) – Opener Romario King struck an attractive hundred as unbeaten Trinidad and Tobago powered their way to their third straight win with a 151-run crushing of Jamaica in the Regional Under-15 Super50 Cup here Tuesday.Playing at Liberta, T&T cruised to 324 for six off their 50 overs with King top-scoring with 108 off 129 deliveries, while Andrew Rambarran struck an unbeaten 77 and Justin Jagessar, 61.Opting to bat first, T&T lost Kavir Boodoosingh cheaply for three in the fifth over with the score on 22 but it was the last sighting of major success for Jamaica, as King took charge of the innings.He stroked 14 fours in a 159-run, second-wicket stand with Jagessar who faced 78 balls and counted five fours.When both batsmen fell within 28 balls of each other, Rambarran stepped up to hit eight fours and a six in a quick-fire 54-ball innings, posting 73 for the fourth wicket with wicketkeeper Verran Batchu, who made 28.In reply, Jamaica were restricted to 173 in the 38th over, with Jordan Johnson hitting 64 off 57 balls and inspiring a second-wicket stand of 60 with Adrian Weir (25) and a third-wicket partnership of 51 with Julani Sinclair (40).But from a strong position of 115 for two in the 21st over, Jamaica lost their last eight wickets for 58 runs, with Alexander Chase slicing through the innings, to finish with four wickets for eight runs.Defending champions Barbados, meanwhile, won their second straight game following their opening round defeat, as they brushed aside Leeward Islands by 134 runs at the Vivian Richards Cricket Ground.Choosing to bat, Barbados piled up 318 for eight off 50 overs with middle order batsman Kamario Grant hitting 137 off 123 deliveries.He crunched 11 fours and four sixes, anchoring three successive half-century stands, to pull his side out of trouble at 66 for four in the 17th over.First, he posted 57 for the fifth wicket with Rashad Worrell (39), 95 for the sixth wicket with wicketkeeper Dakio Worrell (40) before adding a further 94 for the seventh wicket with Dave Lovell (21).Leewards were then never in control of their run chase after slumping to 59 for five and were eventually held to 184 for eight off their 50 overs.Nathan Edwards top-scored with an unbeaten 60 from 101 balls.In the other game played at Coolidge Cricket Ground, Windward Islands suffered their first defeat when they failed to chase down Guyana’s 222 for nine and lost by 25 runs.last_img read more

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