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Watford v Chelsea line-ups: Luiz back, no Alonso, new signings on bench, Watford make changes

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesDavid Luiz is recalled to the Chelsea side for the game at Vicarage Road – his first league start since October.Luiz gets the nod over Antonio Rudiger to replace Andreas Christensen, who suffered a hamstring injury against Bournemouth.Willian is back after his own hamstring problem but Ross Barkley is again nursing a hamstring injury and misses out.So too does Marcos Alonso, who is absent along with the injured Alvaro Morata. Davide Zappacosta therefore starts on the flank.New signings Olivier Giroud and Emerson Palmieri are both among Chelsea’s substitutes.Watford make two changes, with Christian Kabasele and Tom Cleverley being replaced by Daryl Janmaat and Marvin Zeegelaar. The Hornets appear to have switched to a back three.Watford: Karnezis, Janmaat, Prodl, Mariappa, Zeegelaar, Holebas, Capoue, Richarlison, Doucoure, Deulofeu, Deeney.Subs: Bachmann, Ndong, Gray, Lukebakio, Carrillo, Pereyra, Mukena.Chelsea: Courtois; Azpilicueta, Luiz, Cahill; Moses, Bakayoko, Kante, Zappacosta; Willian, Hazard, Pedro.Subs: Caballero, Rudiger, Emerson, Drinkwater, Fabregas, Hudson-Odoi, Giroud. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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San Jose Sharks re-sign two restricted free agents

first_imgSAN JOSE — The Sharks signed two more of their restricted free-agent forwards Thursday, giving Dylan Gambrell a two-year contract extension and Antti Suomela a one-year deal.Gambrell, San Jose’s second-round draft pick in 2016, played just eight games with the Sharks this past season. He became just the second Sharks player ever to score his first NHL goal in the playoffs when he scored in Game 6 of the Western Conference Final against the St. Louis Blues. Marcel Goc — in 2004 — was the …last_img read more

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Hummingbird Tongue More Clever Than Thought

first_imgHumans sip their nectar by tipping a glass and slurping, but how can a hummingbird pull liquid out of flowers with a tongue alone?  Up until now, scientists thought that hummingbird tongues acted like capillary tubes.  New research with high-speed cameras show that the action is much more clever – so clever it might lead to advances in human machinery.    PhysOrg posted a summary of a paper on PNAS,1 where scientists from the University of Connecticut decided to check out how hummingbirds do it.  Using high-speed cameras on 30 hummingbirds from 10 species, Rico-Guevara and Rubega discovered that the hummingbird tongue acts as a fluid trap, not a capillary tube.     The tongue splits into two parts, lined with hair-like extensions called lamellae.  As the bird pulls the tongue out from the nectar, the two parts come together automatically and trap the nectar, pulling the food into the mouth.  The PhysOrg article includes four video clips showing the action in slow motion.    The researchers further discovered that the same action occurs when the tongue of dead birds is pulled through simulated nectar, showing it is an automatic action, “therefore highly efficient because no energy expenditure by the bird is required to drive the opening and closing of the trap.”  According to the article, hummingbirds flick their tongues in and out of the nectar as fast as 20 times per second.    The abstract from the paper ended with a tantalizing hint of where this research can lead: “We propose a conceptual mechanical explanation for this unique fluid-trapping capacity, with far-reaching practical applications (e.g., biomimetics).”    Bird lovers will want to watch the entertaining performance on Science Nation of Griffin, an African gray parrot, posted on Live Science.  Is this bird really smart enough to understand shapes and colors, or is it responding to subconscious cues from its trainers?  Whether or not you believe Irene Pepperberg’s claim that they controlled for such cues, everyone will agree that “bird brains” are “smarter than you think.”    David Catchpoole at Creation.com wrote about the brilliant colors of parrots and commented in a sidebar about Dr. Pepperberg’s work on parrot intelligence.  Meanwhile, PhysOrg wrote about how physicists at Yale University have found a way to improve lasers by imitating the techniques birds use to flash bright colors.1.  Rico-Guevara and Rubega, “The hummingbird tongue is a fluid trap, not a capillary tube,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online before print May 2, 2011, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1016944108.Hummingbirds and parrots are not only beautiful, they are well designed and intelligent.  We hope this Amazing Facts entry will grant you even more appreciation as you watch the hummingbird feeder.  If you don’t have one, go get one; the performances will delight and astonish the family.  For a good film sequence about the design of hummingbirds, get the beautiful film God of Wonders at RPI, where you can buy copies in bulk to share with friends and acquaintances.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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May the Fourth Be With You – Star Wars Cache (GC2FDRQ) – Geocache of the Week

first_img SharePrint RelatedIf you build it, they will cache. — “1988 Field of Dreams” (GC359Z4) — Geocache of the WeekApril 9, 2015In “Geocache of the Week”I hope you’re not afraid of the dark. — Antuna Underground (GC2B3BY) — Geocache of the Week Video EditionOctober 2, 2013In “Geocaching with Kids”One geocache to rule them all — Helms Klamm (GC2WGRR) — Geocache of the WeekMay 29, 2013In “Community” Jedi mind tricks aside, this is the geocache you’re looking for. Luckily, you won’t have to travel to a galaxy far far away to find it. This week’s Geocache of the Week, Star Wars Cache (GC2FDRQ), takes us to the filming location for the Mos Eisley scenes in Star Wars IV: A New Hope.“Mos Eisley spaceport: You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy.” – Obi-Wan Kenobi Hmm….looks fine to us. Photo by geocacher lagosiIf you aren’t sure why this week’s Geocache of the Week is Star Wars themed, I’ll explain. This Saturday, May 4, is a special holiday for Star Wars fans. “May the Fourth” sounds similar to “May the Force” which is part of the famous line, “May the Force be with you.” Basically, it’s just a day for Star Wars fans to boast about why Star Wars is better than Star Trek, remember the epic saga of the original trilogy, try to forget the prequel trilogy and emphatically declare who shot first (FYI: it was Han).Another view of Mos Eisley. Photo by geocacher Kitou&Laulo44Since time when Mos Eisley was a bustling spaceport filled with smugglers, villains  droids, Jedi and everyone’s favorite alien band, Figrin D’an and the Modal Nodes, things have calmed down quite a bit. In fact, you’ll be hard-pressed to even find a smuggler that can do the Kessel Run in 12 parsecs. However, you will be able to explore the remains of this once lively town on Tatooine. Actually, the set used for many of the scenes set on the planet Tatooine were located in Tunisia, near the town of  Tataouine. Coincidence? My intuition tells me no.A young Padawan near the geocache. Photo by geocacher Blaue-EliseEven without the presence of Tusken Raiders, the journey to this difficulty 1, terrain 5 geocache can be quite treacherous. Geocachers will have to travel through miles of sand dunes to reach the town. However, once you arrive in the town, finding the geocache won’t be too difficult—just make sure to use your cloaking device to prevent muggles from catching on. Geocachers from around the world have traveled to this iconic location to see a piece of galactic history. Geocacher s1las wrote, “My son and me found the force and the Cache…Our first overseas cache its the best yet TFTC.”Movie-themed geocaches are everywhere. What’s your favorite movie theme or what movie theme would you most like to see in a geocache? Tell us in the comments.Also, this year’s Geocaching Worldwide Flash Mobs will take place on Saturday with the theme, “May the Fourth be with you.” It would be a great time to meet other Star Wars loving geocachers. Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com.The force was with this team of geocachers. Photo by geocacher Lukas.VeverkaIf you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, send an email with your name, comments, the name of the geocache, and the GC code to [email protected] with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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5 Essentials Tools for Your Documentary Camera Package

first_imgIn this write-up, we’ll take a look at five of the best, highest-quality tools and accessories to make your documentary camera package top notch.Building the perfect documentary camera package is a constantly changing process. Through years of trial and error, you begin to find which camera system (and accompanying tools and accessories) works best for you. Although cameras are constantly evolving, accessories can remain consistent across multiple camera systems. For this reason, I’ve always found it highly advantageous to buy the highest-quality tools and accessories I can afford.1. Articulating ArmImage via Wooden Camera.Articulating arms are one of the most versatile tools you can have in your camera package. Whether you use them to mount an external monitor, a wireless video feed, or even an audio recorder, these arms are very beneficial. When it comes to articulating arms, you most certainly get what you pay for. While it’s easy to find many cheap models, buy the absolute best that you can, so this valuable tool will be a part of your kit for years to come.My personal favorite is the Wooden Camera Ultra Arm. It’s robust, strong, and ultimately reliable, in even the most extreme conditions.2. Follow FocusImage via Wooden Camera.A solid follow focus system will last you multiple camera and lens systems. Also, a quality follow focus will prove vastly beneficial when you’re filming the reactionary style content involved in documentary filmmaking. If your follow focus decides to fail, then your shot could also fail.There are many great options out there for quick, lightweight follow focuses. My go-to is the zip focus from Wooden Camera.3. Dovetail PlateImage via Wooden Camera.With documentary filmmaking, you have to be consistently on-the-go and as reactionary as possible. However, sometimes lifting your camera off the tripod head can take longer than you expected, and the movement is never very smooth.Fortunately, a dovetail plate makes that transition exceptionally smooth and safe.4. External MonitorImage via SmallHD.Documentary filmmakers tend to keep their camera packages as light and portable as possible. As a result, external monitors are typically one of the first things to go. However, these monitors’ benefits far outweigh the space they take up.The added benefits of false color, focus peaking, higher resolution, and a variety of other perks make external monitors an essential addition. Fortunately, external monitor manufactures, like SmallHD, have taken the need for lightweight options into consideration with products like their Focus 5 inch monitor. For this reason, it’s now an even easier choice to add a monitor to your documentary camera package.5. EasyRigImage via EasyRig.I’ve found an EasyRig is one of the best gear investments I’ve ever made. One of these can save your back, supporting you while you operate the camera all day with significantly reduced fatigue. Most often, you’ll see someone using a system like this for gimbal work, but they’re just as great, if not better, for handheld work and the demands of documentary filmmaking.While the number of filmmaking tools available is nearly limitless, these are five that I’ve never regretted adding to my documentary camera package.Cover image via REDPIXEL.PL.Everything You Need to Know About Chroma Key and Green Screen FootageWhy We’re in The Golden Age of Documentary Filmmaking5 Tips on How to Create a Great Short Documentary FilmHow a Pre-Production Checklist Can Help Your ProductionThe Complete Video Editors Guide to Working with Musiclast_img read more

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Third Umpire: Dalmiya is raring to get back to the game

first_imgWhen someone worried came rushing to Jagmohan Dalmiya, the then president of the International Cricket Council (ICC), and said that the Queen was keen to distribute the prizes after the World Cup final at Lord’s, London, in 1999, he deflected the request very cleverly and deftly in a way that would not annoy the Monarch.Dalmiya, much after demitting office in 2000, had revealed in an interview that his answer to the man was that the ceremony could be deferred by a few minutes and the Queen could leave the ground during this time. It happened exactly like that and as per the ICC convention — Dalmiya, being the president — presented the trophy to Aussie captain Steve Waugh.That is Dalmiya for you — sharp, witty, humorous and known for never accepting defeat. And quite characteristically the old fox rallied back again to force his rivals in the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) to withdraw the case of misappropriation of money and announce the decision at Wednesday’s AGM in Mumbai.The 70-year-old seasoned administrator was facing allegations of misappropriation of Rs 2.90 crore from the 1996 World Cup accounts. Like on several previous occasions he emerged from the abyss. But there is much more to him than that.Dalmiya has an uncanny ability to find a solution to even the most tricky problem. Of course, he has been assisted by a core group of advisors and friends. They include noted advocate Usha Nath Banerjee, National Cricket Club secretary KP Kajaria, Cricket Association of Bengal’s Gautam Dasgupta, former politician and diplomat Siddhartha Shankar Ray and the late Bengal chief minister Jyoti Basu.advertisementThat Dalmiya helped raise millions of rupees to the BCCI’s and ICC’s coffers is well known.When he was elected BCCI secretary in 1983 its coffers showed a deficit of Rs 85 lakhs and when his term as board president ended in 2004 the balance had swelled to over Rs 100 crores.One of his former board colleagues recalls how he once surprised former board president AC Muthiah, whom Dalmiya succeeded in 2001, by squeezing an unexpectedly high sponsorship deal with a soft drink firm with his aggressive bargaining style.The Kolkata-based Marwari knows how to deal with people.During the 1996 World Cup at home, he received a request from the then external affairs minister Pranab Mukherjee for two match tickets. According to a Dalmiya’s staffer, he took out two from the quota of another Lok Sabha member and gave them to Mukherjee. When his staff told Dalmiya that the affected MP had been pestering for more tickets, he reportedly replied: “I will cross the bridge when I come closer to it.” It’s not that Dalmiya is heartless.He is very compassionate, especially with his personal staff as well as employees of the Cricket Association of Bengal (CAB), of which he is the president, points out a close confidante.”Once he got a BCCI meeting postponed due to ‘personal reasons’. But actually he had to attend the marriage of a CAB clerk,” he disclosed.Dalmiya possesses a good temperament and doesn’t get hassled easily. But after the Pawar- Manohar- Srinivasan trio snatched all his rights and privileges as BCCI administrator in December 2006, it did affect him. ” In the last few years he seems to have aged faster and the effect could be seen on his health,” said another of his close confidantes. ” But in the last year or so, he has looked relaxed as it became increasingly clear that he was on a strong wicket against his BCCI rivals.”Team India still speaks Chappell’s language Greg Chappell’s term as Indian team’s coach ended well over two years ago, with a disastrous outing at the 2007 World Cup. But his legacy is quite evident even now, particularly in the cricketing jargon that he introduced in the country. Some of that may not have been used during the former Australia captain’s twoyear tenure, but almost all players that came in contact with him often use that jargon even now.Even Sourav Ganguly, who had a public spat with Chappell, uses some of that, though probably inadvertently. The other day, at the India Today Youth Summit in Delhi, when he was asked what’s wrong with Yuvraj Singh, whom he had backed so strongly as captain, he replied using a term that Chappell used so often — ‘process’. “You just have to deal with it (ups and downs). That’s why it’s important in life and in sport to keep it simple.Just focus on performance.Once you keep performing, the rest will look after itself,” he said. And then he stressed: “Keep it simple as much as you can. It’s about the process.” Before Chappell, this word was hardly used by Indian cricketers or coaches. The Aussie might have gone, but his legacy remains.advertisementTHE AUSTRALIAN team is playing the first Test in Mohali and its cricketers and the support staff are in great form off the field — on Twitter and blogs. From manager Steve Bernard, who is writing an blog on the official Cricket Australia website, to coach Tim Nielson, several members of the squad are regularly Tweeting or blogging.But the Aussies are mostly focussing on the negative and dark side of India. Both Bernard and Nielson have posted pictures from Mohali that only depict India in poor light — like cows sitting on the middle of the road, a ground staff mopping Chandigarh’s Sector 16 Stadium field with an ordinary sponge with a bucket in tow.Hockey players are literally chilling out It’s blowing hot and cold on the hockey pitches at the Dhyan Chand National Stadium ahead of the Commonwealth Games. Tonnes and tonnes of ice is being used daily by players for post-practice ice bath — a modern way of relaxing their tired bodies, and a part of the cooling down process.After their body temperatures shoot up during intense practice sessions on the energy-sapping artificial pitches, they go through stretching exercises to relax and then they hit the ice cubes. These ice cubes are put in inflatable plastic tubs and players stand waist down in them for a few minutes to cool down completely.This exercise relaxes their bodies, particularly their calf and thigh muscles that bear the brunt on the merciless turf.The demand from the 20 teams in the men’s and women’s competitions varies from 100 kg to 200 kg ice per practice session.There have been well over 100 practice sessions since the stadium was opened for the teams on September 24 and there will be more at the Yamuna Sports Complex once the competition begins on Monday at the National Stadium.Add a total of 54 men’s and women’s competition matches to this and imagine the quantity of ice that would have been used by the time the gold medal winners are decided on October 14. Mind boggling, indeed! Trucks full of ice are delivered to the National Stadium daily and it is kept in huge containers.The demand by the Indian men’s team, for instance, is 150kg for each practice session and another 50kg during matches, disclosed national coach Harendra Singh.”Players need ice bath for refreshing themselves. It also brings down their body temperatures,” Harendra told Mail Today. “Apart from the 150kg for practice, we need 50kg for matches. When players come out of the pitch during substitutions they wear ice jackets for immediate recovery. All the players who are benched during matches compulsorily wear ice jackets as they are sent on to the pitch again. We have 16 ice jackets, imported from Australia by the Sports Authority of India, and each one costs approximately Rs 6,500.”advertisementlast_img read more

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