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A return to previous levels of censorship feared

first_imgNews July 22, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 A return to previous levels of censorship feared to go further April 16, 2020 Find out more Update : On July 25th, the defamation complaint towards Jean-Luc Rahaga and Solo Rabfiringa was withdrawn. The journalists were released and cheered by their colleagues, strongly mobilised since their arrest.——————————————————————————————–22.07.2014Two newspaper journalists have been held on defamation charges since yesterday for publishing a reader’s letter accusing government ministers of involvement in the trafficking of rosewood. Their arrest comes just weeks after a disturbing comments about media freedom by the president.The journalists are Jean-Luc Rahaga, publisher and editor-in-chief of the Madagascar Matin daily newspaper, and Didier Randriambinintsoa, one of his editors, who uses the names of Solo Rabefiringa and Didier Ramanoelina.Currently held in Antananarivo’s notorious Antanimora prison, they are due to appear in court at 1 p.m. tomorrow.“Putting two journalists in prison for defamation is disproportionate,” said Clea Kahn-Sriber, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Africa desk. “How can you justify depriving them of their freedom just for publishing a letter? What threat to society do they pose ?”Kahn-Sriber added: “Such severity raises questions about a politically-motivated decision to jail them. It is disturbing to see Madagascar return to censorship’s darkest hours. We call for the immediate release of these two journalists, who have no place in prison.”Rahaga was summoned to the national gendarmerie’s criminal investigation department at 7:30 a.m. yesterday and was interrogated for several hours without interruption. “I haven’t eaten or drunk anything for the past seven hours,” he told Reporters Without Borders at one point yesterday.Randriambinintsoa was summoned “for reasons concerning him” a few hours after Rahaga. The case was transferred in the afternoon to the prosecutor’s office, which issued an order at around 6 p.m. for the two journalists’ arrest. Such speed is rare in the Madagascan judicial system and suggests political pressure to handle the case quickly.Their arrests are the result of a defamation complaint by several persons, including Rivo Rakotovao, the minister responsible for land infrastructure and planning, in connection with a reader’s letter published on 12 July accusing him, environment minister Anthelme Ramparany and trade minister Narson Rafidimanana of involvement in the trafficking of rosewood.The arrests seem to confirm that the climate for freedom of information has deteriorated since Héry Rajaonarimampianina’s election as president last December after a four-year political crisis. Earlier this month, the president said there were “limits” to press freedom and warned journalists to “be on their guard,” while the prime minister asked journalists to stop putting “difficult questions” to the president.Madagascar is ranked 81st out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. April 30, 2021 Find out more Madagascar : Sabotage silences TV channel that criticized coronavirus measures November 27, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information (photo : Jean-Luc Rahaga and Solo Rabefiringa intering in Antanimora prison ) Reports RSF_en MadagascarAfrica RSF urges Madagascar to let journalists cover Covid-19 freely MadagascarAfrica News The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa Follow the news on Madagascar News Receive email alerts Organisation last_img read more

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Fears new Letterkenny road could create more traffic congestion

first_img Fears new Letterkenny road could create more traffic congestion Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme AudioHomepage BannerNews Pinterest WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Twitter Facebookcenter_img WhatsApp Google+ Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Previous articleCentral bank expects wages to rise faster than previously thoughtNext articleCalls for revival of Oldtown pitch to Donegal League Standard News Highland Facebook Google+ DL Debate – 24/05/21 By News Highland – April 12, 2018 There are fears that the new Joe Bonner Road in Letterkenny could create more traffic problems for the town.The road is to be situated between the Council offices and the new Aldi and will link the Port Road onto the Neil T Blaney road once complete.Donegal County Council is planning to erect traffic lights as part of traffic management in the area but Cllr. Dessie Sheils believes that this will lead to further congestion issues.He says this is a very busy part of the town and a roundabout would be more fitting:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/dessiefgfgfdgdjoebonner.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th last_img read more

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Jeremiah Ware sentenced to 30 years in shooting

first_img Facebook By Tommie Lee – May 13, 2020 0 422 WhatsApp Facebook (Source: https://goo.gl/apvBBL/ License: https://goo.gl/VAhsB) Jeremiah Ware, 18, was sentenced to 30 years Tuesday for his role in a January 2019 shooting in South Bend.Ware was found guilty in January of Attempted Murder and Aggravated Battery felonies, and sentenced in the first count with judgement withheld on the second.Ware was the last of three people charged in connection with the investigation. The shooting happened on January 14 of 2019 in the 600 block of North Cushing Ave. Jeremiah Ware sentenced to 30 years in shooting Twitter Pinterest Twitter Pinterest Google+ Google+ WhatsApp IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Previous articleMishawaka Police looking for suspect in attack on 7-11 clerkNext articleGov. Whitmer concerned that Michigan protesters could cause longer stay-home duration Tommie Leelast_img read more

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Spitzer calls for financial oversight

first_imgHis appearance attracted a crowd and a frenzy of media attention.But those who were anticipating a dramatic encounter involving Eliot Spitzer, the former governor of New York who resigned last year in connection with a prostitution case, came away instead with a highly nuanced argument about the need for broader financial regulations.Spitzer, J.D. ’84, appeared at Emerson Hall Thursday (Nov. 12) at the invitation of Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics to take part in the center’s Lab Lectures on the Question of Institutional Corruption. The lectures are designed to launch a five-year research project on the topic.Spitzer made a name for himself as the tough-minded attorney general of New York state, in large part for his aggressive prosecution of white-collar crime, including insurance companies and Wall Street securities firms. During his remarks, he took the audience through a lengthy and detailed discussion on the importance of government involvement in establishing transparency in the financial sector.Government has a significant role to play, argued the Harvard Law School (HLS) graduate, in establishing a critical sense of economic transparency.“Only government can enforce rules relating to integrity and transparency in the marketplace,” he said, and “only government can get these companies to tell the truth.”Spitzer outlined what he considered a host of problems with the government’s response to the nation’s economic crisis, including his concern with the notion that a company can be “too big to fail,” an argument made during the early days to help justify an expensive corporate bailout.“Too big to fail is too big not to fail. When [companies] get that big, they are inevitably going to fail, because you can’t manage them.”Corporate governance is at “the heart and soul of what has failed” the nation’s economic system over the last quarter century, said Spitzer, adding that one of the clear ways forward is to allow shareholders to elect a company’s board of directors.The subject of Spitzer’s resignation from the governorship came up only briefly, at the beginning and end of the discussion.“We hold these lectures to address serious and difficult matters,” said Lawrence Lessig, professor of law at HLS and the center’s director, who introduced Spitzer. But, he added, the attention generated by the talk meant it required additional “framing.”“No one doubts that what Gov. Spitzer did was wrong … likewise no one doubts that until the moment he was charged, at least, Gov. Spitzer inspired the very best in our profession. Whether popular or not, he worked aggressively to serve ideals bigger than himself … he was enormously successful in holding accountable those who used power to do enormous harm.”“I have invited Eliot Spitzer to contribute to these talks because of the breadth of his experience,” Lessig  said, “and, no doubt, the depth of his reflection upon where and how the problems which we study…  might be addressed.”Following his talk, Spitzer gave a simple reply to a question involving his decision to leave office: “I resigned because I thought it was the right thing to do, and the actions that led to it were wrong.”last_img read more

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Rosa Parks’ historic action recalled across U.S.

first_img Elijah Taylor, 12, said he joined the children’s parade “to give tribute to all those people in Montgomery who walked during the bus boycott,” as well as Parks. The boycott, which hurt the city financially and drew the nation’s attention to the emerging movement for racial equality, ended Dec. 21, 1956, after the Supreme Court upheld a federal court ruling that outlawed racial segregation on city buses. All buses in Montgomery paid tribute to Parks by leaving a seat empty with a display commemorating her act of defiance. In New York, empty seats were marked with posters carrying a picture of Parks and a message: “It all started on a bus.” Bus drivers were keeping headlights on all day. In Philadelphia, middle school students planned to write comments about Parks on posters on the outside of a bus to be used in regular service. Bus tributes had also been arranged in Boston, Cleveland, Newark, N.J., and Washington, D.C. In Detroit, a federal building was being renamed for Parks in an afternoon ceremony. The resolution renaming the building was signed into law by Bush on Nov. 11. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! MONTGOMERY, Ala. – About 2,000 children marched arm-in-arm Thursday, singing “We Shall Overcome” in a once-segregated city marking the 50th anniversary of Rosa Parks’ refusal to give up her bus seat to a white man. “Because of the action of Rosa Parks we have witnessed – here in Montgomery, in the state of Alabama, all across the South – unbelievable changes,” Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., said after laying a wreath at the site where Parks was arrested on Dec. 1, 1955. The children, both black and white, marched eight blocks from the downtown site to the Capitol, singing civil-rights anthems and chanting “Thank you, Rosa Parks.” The march was one of many events in Montgomery and elsewhere in the nation in remembrance of Parks’ action and the 381-day bus boycott that followed. She died Oct. 24 at age 92 in Detroit. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals In Washington, President George W. Bush signed a bill directing that a statue of Parks go up in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall, making her the first black woman to be represented there. In Montgomery, civil rights leaders joined the children for a program at the Alabama Capitol, where 12-year-old Courtney Meadows urged young people to take action for what is right, just as Parks did. “I believe it was one of Mrs. Rosa Parks’ greatest dreams, and today she is looking down on us. It’s time to take action,” she said after the program. The program included readings from speeches by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who gained renown leading the boycott, and from fliers passed out by hand in 1955 urging blacks not to ride the buses. “Look back, but march forward,” boycott veteran Johnnie Carr urged the crowd. last_img read more

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