Tag: 杭州kb场

‘I’m no cry baby!’ Sunderland boss reacts to touchline spat with Steve Bruce

first_imgSunderland head coach Gus Poyet has played down a touchline spat with Hull manager Steve Bruce during the sides’ 1-1 draw on Tuesday night.The Black Cats boss was sent to the stands for protesting a yellow card shown to Jack Rodwell for diving, and was involved in an altercation with the Tigers chief on his way from the dugout.But when asked for his take on the bizarre events, the Uruguayan insisted it was all over nothing.“I kicked a bucket…a water bottle,” said Poyet.“Unfortunately some of the water came out and it didn’t look right, so I was sent off…simple as that.“The referee sent me off and by the rules I suppose that is the decision, so I need to accept that. Yes I did kick the bottle, and a little bit hard, but that was my strength when I was a player!”But what happened with Bruce?“I’m sorry but I’m old fashioned, so what happens on the pitch stays on the pitch,” he added.“I never come out and cry like a baby, so I keep that to myself.“There hasn’t been time to see him after the game, because we get fined if we don’t speak to the press 20 minutes after, so I will probably see him later.”The 1-1 draw leaves the Black Cats just four points clear of the bottom-three, but Poyet insists the point earned against the Tigers could prove vital in their battle to avoid the drop.“It’s an important point in a difficult game,” said the coach.“For a long period it looked like the game was getting away from us, but we didn’t stop.“We didn’t create too many chances, but we tried as best we could and never gave up.”last_img read more

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Fishing the North Coast: Wild steelhead harvest could end on the Chetco

first_imgA petition requesting a temporary rule change restricting harvest of wild winter steelhead in the Oregon Southwest Zone, which includes the Chetco River, was submitted on Nov. 4 by a group of Oregon fishing guides to the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission. If accepted, the emergency rule change would go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020.According to the petition, the proposed temporary regulation changes will provide angling opportunity while reducing direct harvest and increase spawning escapement …last_img read more

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Ryanair passenger found with bomb was still allowed to fly

first_imgPhoto: Ryanair. According to the Irish Independent Nadeem Mulhammed (43) was arrested by police on suspicion of terrorism after “batteries wrapped in brown tape” was found in his bag.He was boarding a Ryanair flight to Bergamo when he was held under the UK’s terrorism act at security.However, after allegedly telling officers the device had been planted by someone else, he was released on bail and allowed to travel.The man flew to Italy but in the meantime, tests revealed it was a “viable device” containing sufficient explosives to cause “serious damage and loss of life” on a plane, the court heard.Upon his return back to the UK, Mr Mulhammed was arrested at Manchester Airport on Sunday and charged with being in possession of an explosive substance.The device found consisted of a “small pipe, like a large market pen’ and was filled with “smokeless propellant often found in ammunition.”Mr Muhammed was remanded in custody and is due to appear in court in March.More on Ryanair.last_img read more

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From discards to employers: Fast growth at Eco Furniture

first_imgPeter Haralambous, co-owner of Eco Furniture Design, helped build the business from a small concern began by constructing a table from discarded wood to one of the fastest-growing small businesses in South Africa. Eco Furniture Design has made craftspeople out of people who came to them with no skills.(Images: Eco Furniture Design)MEDIA CONTACTS • Tameron GrahnOwner, Eco Furniture Design+27 21 827 1336Sulaiman PhilipEco Furniture Design, a Cape Town company, has been named the fastest growing small business incubatee by the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti).The recognition came at the National Technology Awards, held in Durban in October. The awards celebrate small to medium enterprises (SMEs) that embrace technology to improve their competitiveness.There are 12 incubator programmes across the country in industries as diverse as IT, construction and agriculture. The programmes are designed to get enterprises from a survivalist stage or from the informal economy into thriving businesses in the mainstream economy. The awards, made by the the dti, were held at iNkosi Albert Luthuli International Convention Centre.Eco Furniture Design was recognised for the fastest growth across all the industries. “We went from two employees as a start-up almost two years ago to a point where we employ 12 people today,” says founding partner Peter Haralambous. The business grew out of Peter and his partner, Tameron Grahn, building a table from some wood they found discarded at the side of the road.The partners saw a business opportunity once friends started asking them to build furniture for them as well. Without funding or woodwork experience, they approached the Furntech incubator in Woodstock, Cape Town. “They have a two-year programme that helped us to build our business from scratch. It has given us the freedom to employ unskilled people with potential and have them trained at the centre by Seda technicians. This is an aspect of the business that I really enjoy,” Haralambous explains. Support for small enterprisesSeda, the Small Enterprise Development Agency, falls under the dti. Its mission is to develop, support and promote small enterprises, ensuring their growth and sustainability in co-ordination and partnership with various role players, including global partners, who make international best practices available to local entrepreneurs.The Furntech incubator, one of the smallest in the country, has space for 12 furniture-related businesses, from designers to manufacturers like Eco Furniture. It has state-of-the-art machinery and trained technicians who help teach skills to entrepreneurs and their employees. Furntech’s business technology incubation is affiliated to the Seda Technology Programme, which develops innovative technology based platforms that result in the creation of sustainable, globally competitive small, medium and micro enterprises.Lucky Mhlanga, an Eco Furniture employee, has been with the company since it began. He started with no carpentry skills but today is a carpenter, having been trained to artisan level at the incubator.Access to equipment works on rotation, which has inadvertently proven to be a good business lesson for Haralambous. It has taught him the importance of lead times and scheduling production. It is early days yet for the company, with the hiccoughs that come with starting a business. Easing the way, though, along with the technical assistance offered at incubators like Furntech, entrepreneurs can access funding and business skills training. Training and teaching skills“Being part of this programme has allowed us to build our business. It’s allowed us to hire unskilled people and train them. It has allowed us to grow steadily in a relatively safe environment. It’s early days yet but we’ve been given firm grounding.”Haralambous is looking for new factory premises as Eco Furniture is almost two years old and must soon leave the Furntech space. The dti has moved it from one programme to another, one that gives businesses that come through the incubator system grants to help fund the purchase of equipment. “The programme is designed to assist with technology transfers and ensure that we build on the last two years of success.”The department and its minister, Rob Davies, recognise the importance of South African businesses embracing technology to remain competitive. “Technology is no longer a luxury for small- to medium-sized enterprises. The Technology Awards are designed to inspire and encourage creativity and technological innovativeness among business people by rewarding those that make use of technology to advance their business,” Davies said on the eve of the awards ceremony.The awards showcase successes from three programmes the dti runs with various parastatals:● With the Industrial Development Corporation, it runs the Support Programme for Industrial Innovation. This fund helps companies that develop innovative products or processes from the conclusion of research and ends once a prototype has been developed.● With the National Research Foundation, it runs the Technology and Human Resource for Industry Programme, which spends R390-million a year on research in science, technology and engineering. The focus is to train and develop researchers and technology managers who will help develop and improve competitive practices across all industries.● With Seda, it has run the Seda Technology Programme since 2006 with a focus on improving government support for small- to medium-sized businesses. Government research has found that most small, technology based businesses that failed did so in their first three years. STP is designed to give small start-ups support and training to improve access to technology and management support to improve productivity and performance. Other winnersOther winners on the night were Durban IT development and training company Smart Xchange, and Thabong Bakery, from Welkom in Free State. The awards are growing more prestigious and more competitive, says the director-general in the dti, Lionel October. “The development of small, medium and micro enterprises in partnership with the government, using programmes like these three, can bring a positive spin to the creation of jobs.”It is this network of resources that has helped Anna Lelimo, the owner of Thabong Bakery, to grow her business from a home-based caterer to one that supplies bread and confectionaries to 30 supermarkets. The mother of two made a brave decision to change careers in 2001 to follow her dream to be her own boss.Lelimo told her hometown newspaper, The Weekly, after receiving her award: “It is liberating to take your life in your own hands and decide what you are going to do with it and where you want to take it. When I embarked on this new chapter in my life as a business owner, there were a lot of challenges and sacrifices, but when you are determined to succeed, no matter how difficult the road, you will find a way to accomplish your dreams.”last_img read more

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Third Umpire: Dalmiya is raring to get back to the game

first_imgWhen someone worried came rushing to Jagmohan Dalmiya, the then president of the International Cricket Council (ICC), and said that the Queen was keen to distribute the prizes after the World Cup final at Lord’s, London, in 1999, he deflected the request very cleverly and deftly in a way that would not annoy the Monarch.Dalmiya, much after demitting office in 2000, had revealed in an interview that his answer to the man was that the ceremony could be deferred by a few minutes and the Queen could leave the ground during this time. It happened exactly like that and as per the ICC convention — Dalmiya, being the president — presented the trophy to Aussie captain Steve Waugh.That is Dalmiya for you — sharp, witty, humorous and known for never accepting defeat. And quite characteristically the old fox rallied back again to force his rivals in the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) to withdraw the case of misappropriation of money and announce the decision at Wednesday’s AGM in Mumbai.The 70-year-old seasoned administrator was facing allegations of misappropriation of Rs 2.90 crore from the 1996 World Cup accounts. Like on several previous occasions he emerged from the abyss. But there is much more to him than that.Dalmiya has an uncanny ability to find a solution to even the most tricky problem. Of course, he has been assisted by a core group of advisors and friends. They include noted advocate Usha Nath Banerjee, National Cricket Club secretary KP Kajaria, Cricket Association of Bengal’s Gautam Dasgupta, former politician and diplomat Siddhartha Shankar Ray and the late Bengal chief minister Jyoti Basu.advertisementThat Dalmiya helped raise millions of rupees to the BCCI’s and ICC’s coffers is well known.When he was elected BCCI secretary in 1983 its coffers showed a deficit of Rs 85 lakhs and when his term as board president ended in 2004 the balance had swelled to over Rs 100 crores.One of his former board colleagues recalls how he once surprised former board president AC Muthiah, whom Dalmiya succeeded in 2001, by squeezing an unexpectedly high sponsorship deal with a soft drink firm with his aggressive bargaining style.The Kolkata-based Marwari knows how to deal with people.During the 1996 World Cup at home, he received a request from the then external affairs minister Pranab Mukherjee for two match tickets. According to a Dalmiya’s staffer, he took out two from the quota of another Lok Sabha member and gave them to Mukherjee. When his staff told Dalmiya that the affected MP had been pestering for more tickets, he reportedly replied: “I will cross the bridge when I come closer to it.” It’s not that Dalmiya is heartless.He is very compassionate, especially with his personal staff as well as employees of the Cricket Association of Bengal (CAB), of which he is the president, points out a close confidante.”Once he got a BCCI meeting postponed due to ‘personal reasons’. But actually he had to attend the marriage of a CAB clerk,” he disclosed.Dalmiya possesses a good temperament and doesn’t get hassled easily. But after the Pawar- Manohar- Srinivasan trio snatched all his rights and privileges as BCCI administrator in December 2006, it did affect him. ” In the last few years he seems to have aged faster and the effect could be seen on his health,” said another of his close confidantes. ” But in the last year or so, he has looked relaxed as it became increasingly clear that he was on a strong wicket against his BCCI rivals.”Team India still speaks Chappell’s language Greg Chappell’s term as Indian team’s coach ended well over two years ago, with a disastrous outing at the 2007 World Cup. But his legacy is quite evident even now, particularly in the cricketing jargon that he introduced in the country. Some of that may not have been used during the former Australia captain’s twoyear tenure, but almost all players that came in contact with him often use that jargon even now.Even Sourav Ganguly, who had a public spat with Chappell, uses some of that, though probably inadvertently. The other day, at the India Today Youth Summit in Delhi, when he was asked what’s wrong with Yuvraj Singh, whom he had backed so strongly as captain, he replied using a term that Chappell used so often — ‘process’. “You just have to deal with it (ups and downs). That’s why it’s important in life and in sport to keep it simple.Just focus on performance.Once you keep performing, the rest will look after itself,” he said. And then he stressed: “Keep it simple as much as you can. It’s about the process.” Before Chappell, this word was hardly used by Indian cricketers or coaches. The Aussie might have gone, but his legacy remains.advertisementTHE AUSTRALIAN team is playing the first Test in Mohali and its cricketers and the support staff are in great form off the field — on Twitter and blogs. From manager Steve Bernard, who is writing an blog on the official Cricket Australia website, to coach Tim Nielson, several members of the squad are regularly Tweeting or blogging.But the Aussies are mostly focussing on the negative and dark side of India. Both Bernard and Nielson have posted pictures from Mohali that only depict India in poor light — like cows sitting on the middle of the road, a ground staff mopping Chandigarh’s Sector 16 Stadium field with an ordinary sponge with a bucket in tow.Hockey players are literally chilling out It’s blowing hot and cold on the hockey pitches at the Dhyan Chand National Stadium ahead of the Commonwealth Games. Tonnes and tonnes of ice is being used daily by players for post-practice ice bath — a modern way of relaxing their tired bodies, and a part of the cooling down process.After their body temperatures shoot up during intense practice sessions on the energy-sapping artificial pitches, they go through stretching exercises to relax and then they hit the ice cubes. These ice cubes are put in inflatable plastic tubs and players stand waist down in them for a few minutes to cool down completely.This exercise relaxes their bodies, particularly their calf and thigh muscles that bear the brunt on the merciless turf.The demand from the 20 teams in the men’s and women’s competitions varies from 100 kg to 200 kg ice per practice session.There have been well over 100 practice sessions since the stadium was opened for the teams on September 24 and there will be more at the Yamuna Sports Complex once the competition begins on Monday at the National Stadium.Add a total of 54 men’s and women’s competition matches to this and imagine the quantity of ice that would have been used by the time the gold medal winners are decided on October 14. Mind boggling, indeed! Trucks full of ice are delivered to the National Stadium daily and it is kept in huge containers.The demand by the Indian men’s team, for instance, is 150kg for each practice session and another 50kg during matches, disclosed national coach Harendra Singh.”Players need ice bath for refreshing themselves. It also brings down their body temperatures,” Harendra told Mail Today. “Apart from the 150kg for practice, we need 50kg for matches. When players come out of the pitch during substitutions they wear ice jackets for immediate recovery. All the players who are benched during matches compulsorily wear ice jackets as they are sent on to the pitch again. We have 16 ice jackets, imported from Australia by the Sports Authority of India, and each one costs approximately Rs 6,500.”advertisementlast_img read more

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