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Venezuela slams U.N. over human rights report

first_imgPublished in pagina12.org.ar July 6. Translation by Michael Otto. On June 28, President Nicolas Maduro awarded Marco Teruggi the Simon Bolivar National Prize for Journalism, with special mention for defending Venezuela abroad. In addition to printing his articles in Mundo Obrero, Workers World has been translating Teruggi’s coverage since January for U.S. readers.The existence of two governments in Venezuela is a fiction that has evaporated internationally. It is only maintained by the Donald Trump administration and some right-wing Latin American governments. Russian President Vladimir Putin, visiting the Vatican, recalled that Juan Guaidó had proclaimed himself “president in charge” before God. Putin added, “But God did not tell us what his reaction to this message was; he did not give us any sign; that’s why I believe we should return to sinful earth and abide by democratic procedures.” Guaidó is no longer what he never was.In national terms, his theatrics never reached a level needed to even look like he ran the government — in almost six months, Guaidó has failed to gain authority, command or territory. That doesn’t mean the final curtain has fallen on his play: On July 5, the anniversary of the day the Declaration of Venezuelan Independence was signed, Guaidó fronted an event in the National Assembly, as if it were a government, and then a demonstration near the General Directorate of Military Counterintelligence (DGCIM).At dawn that same day in Geneva, Switzerland, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet read her report on the situation in Venezuela. Bachelet’s report concluded that Venezuela is ruled by a single government, which, among other things, is responsible for a crisis in health, food and migration, with serious shortcomings in access to justice and the guarantee of human rights.In Geneva, Venezuelan Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs William Castillo responded: “The content of this report is incomprehensible, dominated by a selective and biased vision. It’s a text lacking in scientific rigor, with serious errors in methodology, and seems like a carbon copy of previous reports. It ignores almost all the information provided by the state; it only takes into account information obtained from opposition spokespeople and press sources. Suffice it to say that out of 558 interviews conducted, 460 were conducted outside Venezuela, which represents 82 percent of the opinions expressed in the report.” (La Nación Dominicana, July 6)Bachelet’s [U.N.] report ignores causesCastillo also highlighted the report’s omission of the causes of the economic situation: “It ignores the serious impacts that the illegal, criminal and immoral economic blockade is having on the lives of our people. Venezuela does not deny its problems, but any serious effort to address them must consider the structural causes.”The celebration of the 208th anniversary of Independence Day was marked by an event in the National Constituent Assembly, with a speech by the commander of strategic operations of the Bolivarian National Armed Forces (FANB), Admiral in Chief Remigio Ceballos, who explained the character of the “multiform (war of) aggression” to which Venezuela is subjected and recognized Nicolás Maduro’s leadership as Commander in Chief of the FANB.President Maduro, in turn, led the military parade in Caracas, where he reaffirmed the call for dialogue and peace: “With goodwill, we can achieve the political ability to negotiate. We all have to cede something in order to reach agreements, and I call for dialogue because I believe in and love Venezuela.”The president’s new call for dialogue took place in a scenario where, publicly, the most visible factions of the Venezuelan rightists have announced that they will not resume any kind of contact with the government. Guaidó stated that at the end of Friday’s protest in front of the DGCIM: “The debate is over, Bachelet’s report confirms that this is a dictatorship.” The self-appointed “president” gave no details about what an exit without dialogue would look like. Nor did he mention the mobilizations that he claimed would be forthcoming.Guaidó has demonstrated the paths for the plan without negotiations in recent weeks and months — the attempted military action at dawn on April 30 and the plots involving former soldiers, commissioners and mercenaries that the government uncovered. Video footage recorded by intelligence service infiltrators revealed the very agents of the conspiracy as they were brainstorming how to assassinate the president and the governing circle and carry out military assaults at strategic military and political points. This is no new thing in a conflict where, less than a year ago, opposition sectors tried to assassinate the president at a military parade in Caracas using drones loaded with explosives.Conflict intensifiesThe fiction of two presidents no longer exists internationally. The conflict, however, intensifies with right-wing preparations for new assaults. The right announced that Bachelet’s report — which ignores any dimension of  opposition violence, although they produced victims, like the mother of a young man accused of being a Chavista who was burned alive — validates breaking the dialogue and is a springboard for seeking new actions involving force.As for the blockade, which the report overlooks, the U.S. has announced that it will continue to increase its attacks on both Venezuela and its allies. The latest unilateral measure of force took place July 3 with the sanction of the Cuban company Cubametales by the Office of Foreign Assets Control for trading for oil with Venezuela. This measure is added to the long list of theft of assets, blockades of accounts, sanctions against companies, etc., which began years ago and during 2019 increased month-by-month, meeting only the silence of governments and international organizations.The political climate in Venezuela is complex. Possible types of resolution are not yet on the table, and this week’s events have once again set back what had been publicly achieved between the parties.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Classrooms without walls

first_imgWhen Rebecca Pierre was 9, she would have breakfast each morning with local children attending a nearby summer camp. Day after day Rebecca, who had immigrated to South Boston at age 6, showed up at the camp and sat down to eat. Eventually, a senior counselor took Rebecca’s hand, brought her home, and talked to her mother about getting her enrolled.That was the beginning of Pierre’s commitment to, and passion for, the South Boston Summer Urban Program (SUP), a camp operated by the student-run Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA) out of Harvard University.Twenty-one years later, Rebecca is the director of that camp and a rising senior at Northeastern University. “SUP transformed me. It was a vital piece of my life, and a great part of my growth,” she said.Rebecca and co-director Monique Takla, a 2014 graduate of Harvard College, oversee the camp as two of the 1,500 student volunteers who help to keep PBHA running. The South Boston camp enrolls 50 campers a summer. Rebecca’s little brother is one of them.PBHA is the umbrella organization for 83 student-directed programs run by the student volunteers. The association works to meet critical local needs by providing vital resources to the community while helping to nurture public-service leaders. It’s often called “the best course at Harvard” because it provides students with knowledge and experiences that cannot be learned within classroom walls. Its programs serve close to 10,000 low-income people in Boston and Cambridge annually.SUP is a set of 10 student-run local camps, held at 12 sites. There are 11 days camps and an evening program in English as a second language for immigrant teens. The programs are staffed by more than 120 college students from various colleges and universities. The college students live in dorms on Harvard’s campus for the summer.The camps serve more than 900 low-income, at-risk youths ages 6 to 18. The camps last for seven weeks and cost only $120 per child, though no child is turned away because of an inability to pay.The programs provide a safe, supportive environment for children. They teach violence-prevention activities and serve as an avenue to stop summer learning loss. Research consistently shows that students, particularly those from low-income families, risk losing at least two months of literacy and math skills during the summer. The SUP camps work to stop those losses through activities that blend core academic areas with social and emotional development, and increased community awareness and activism.“The campers leave here with a real sense of community,” Pierre said. “A lot of what we do has a community angle. We have many different partnerships. We work with Marian Manor, a nursing facility down the road. We partner with South Boston Grows, which teaches the kids about urban gardens and healthy living, and we are constantly talking about how to make healthy life choices.”The summer programs are structured around curricular, classroom-based enrichment in the mornings and afternoons field trips around Boston.“PBHA’s SUP camps are a win-win for everyone,” said Maria Dominguez Gray, executive director of PBHA. “Campers and families benefit from enriching programming. Our junior teen counselors are engaged in meaningful employment that offers much-needed job and life skills. And the college students learn so much about themselves, about leadership, effective education, program development, and the various challenges facing urban communities. This is all learning that extends far beyond the classroom.”In addition to the camps in Boston and Cambridge neighborhoods, there are three that are subject-based. Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment serves 100 children from Dorchester, Mattapan, and South Boston. Refugee Youth Summer Enrichment serves more than 100 high school students from neighborhoods in Greater Boston. These camps target youths from more than 15 countries who have low English proficiency. The camps have been officially accepted by the Boston Public Schools as alternatives to summer school. The Native American Youth Enrichment Program serves more than 40 students and is the only urban camp in Massachusetts dedicated to meeting the academic, cultural, and social needs of local Native American youths.The Cambridge Youth Enrichment Program serves more than 160 children at three locations. Besides the camp in South Boston, there are also camps serving Chinatown (70 children), the Franklin Field and Franklin Hill housing developments in Dorchester (80 children), Mission Hill (80 children), and Roxbury (80 children). The Keylatch Summer Program serves 80 children living in housing developments in the South End and Lower Roxbury. 18Campers sang and chanted, with the guidance of Halie Olson, as they headed back to the Condon School after a field trip to Harvard Square. 1Halie Olson looks on as Jayden Melo, 7, gets a goodbye kiss from his mother, Carmen, on the first day of summer school at James F. Condon Elementary in South Boston. 13Andy Nova wanted to see the bunny’s whiskers. 11Sergio Lucero Ruiz needed lots of coaxing to even look at a bunny; a patient counselor eased him toward touching the animal. 8Northeastern student, South Boston resident, and camp co-director Rebecca Pierre (right) works with a misbehaving student on the first day. Pierre, who grew up across the street from the camp in South Boston, spent her summers attending SBOS. She lives in Harvard’s Lowell House with the other senior counselors this summer. 14Adonis Boyce stopped to greet the bunny before the class moved on. 7Counselors Sammy Cruz (center, left) and Beto Vargas play “the name game” — an orientation activity that helps students learn each other’s names. 12Students reacted to seeing a chicken. 9Shafique Holloway, 13, contributes to his classroom’s rules. 4Giovanni Ortiz watches as his son, Javier, high-fives senior counselor Halie Olson ’17 on the first day of camp. 15Julia Perez, 8, hugged a chicken at Farrington Farm. 3Jayden Melo (left) and Javier Ortiz warm up when they see that Cameryn Crowley has returned for another summer. Crowley, a camper since age 7, has moved through the ranks and now works as a junior counselor at South Boston Outreach Summer. 10Campers attend field trips like this one to the Farrington property in Lincoln, Mass., where they were introduced to animals they’d never seen before. 17Hands-on enrichment activities empower youth like Andy Nova, 8, who dared to come face-to-face with a chicken held by Jayden Melo, 7. 2Jaheim Peeple, 12, looks ambivalent on day one of camp. Run by Harvard’s Phillips Brooks House Association, the camp draws students from three public housing developments in Southie, and no child is ever turned away because of an inability to pay. 16The campers fed leaves to goats. 5Adonis Boyce (left) and Andy Nova are happy to see Cameryn Crowley, a junior counselor this year. The campers, ranging in age from 6 to 13, all meet in the cafeteria for breakfast each morning. 6Jonathan Pierre, 12, lists the rules his class has decided collaboratively to follow. Students come from one of three public housing developments in South Boston: Old Colony, Mary Ellen McCormack, and West Broadway. 19An especially exuberant Julia Perez sang as she walked along a Southie street. 20Camping can wear you out! Angelica Suazo, 9, gets a ride from camp co-director Rebecca Pierre (right).last_img read more

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Faculty shares support for immigrant students in advertisement

first_imgAfter raising $22,120 through a GoFundMe account, a group of faculty members took out a full-page ad in the Los Angeles Times on March 23 in order to publicly express their support for immigrants, international students and vulnerable members of the community. The ad, which was signed by 314 faculty members, professed to uphold the core values of the University, encourage University efforts to provide critical resources and protect the human rights of all members of the USC community. Ariela Gross, a professor of law and history at the USC Gould School of Law, established the GoFundMe account and was one of the main coordinators of the effort. “The first action we decided to take was to take out a full-page ad in the L.A. Times in order to express very publicly the strong support of a broad group of USC faculty for our immigrant communities and to urge and support our university administration’s effort to protect our students no matter what happens,” Gross said. Gross hoped that the ad would encourage the University to take direct action to implement policies and allot resources in order to show its support in a more overt manner. For example, Gross looked to set up resource centers specifically for immigrants and international students affected as well as establish emergency funds for legal counsel, with the goal of facilitating more cooperation between those in need of aid and those capable of providing aid. “We’re going to be scheduling teach-ins and training sessions for students and others in our community to be prepared for various contingencies, if they do happen,” Gross said. “We’re trying to have a more coordinative response as well in terms of the way we communicate on these issues to the outside world.”Billy Vela, director of El Centro Chicano, said student response to the ad has been positive. Vela noted that his students exhibited appreciation and gratitude for the show of support. “I think there was a real excitement and appreciation to hear from faculty in support of students and in particular the more vulnerable students on campus,” Vela said. “In particular, I think one student saw that faculty were talking against discrimination, against bigotry, and really being supportive of our community. I can only see it as the Trojan family coming together.”Vela hoped that the ad would open up more avenues of communication and spark productive discussion between the University’s staff and students that could lead to concrete action. “It’s more powerful when you have the University really engaging with our students and our student leaders,” Vela said. “That’s when you really have community because then you have discussion, you have dialogue. The Trojan family should be one where we can discuss and talk about things and use our critical thinking to come up with a plan together.” Tomás Mier contributed to this report.last_img read more

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Dodgers rally for 3 runs in eighth inning to beat Phillies 5-4

first_imgWould they have won this game even two weeks ago?“Probably not, no, we don’t,” Manager Dave Roberts said.“We’re playing good baseball right now,” outfielder Matt Kemp said. “The first month and a half wasn’t the best baseball we played. We knew we were capable of more. We battled a lot of injuries. Guys are starting to step up and make things happen. Once we get firing on all cylinders, making things happen like that, we’ll be a tough team to beat.”Philadelphia (29-22) led 4-2 in the eighth inning when the Dodgers rallied against relievers Luis Garcia and Adam Morgan. There was no grand finale, just a series of small Memorial Day fireworks that added up to a big victory.Puig (2 for 3) led off with an infield single against Garcia. Kemp followed with a gap-splitting double to left center that scored Puig. Morgan entered the game and induced what looked like a catchable pop-up by Kiké Hernandez, but second baseman Cesar Hernandez lost track of the baseball as it fell to the ground. Kiké Hernandez was safe at first base and Kemp advanced to third. Dodgers’ Justin Turner looking rejuvenated on defense Dodgers bench slumping Cody Bellinger for a day Dodgers’ hot-hitting Corey Seager leaves game with back injury “It was kind of rough from the get-go,” Stewart said. “If I come out with the same tempo I had in the third and the fourth inning, I can go deeper in the game and keep the team hanging around in the game.”Clayton Kershaw will return from the disabled list to start Thursday’s game against the Phillies. Stewart is more likely than Walker Buehler, Alex Wood, Kenta Maeda or Ross Stripling to get bumped from the rotation. He might ultimately remain a starter at Triple-A Oklahoma City or find his way back to the Dodgers’ bullpen. The 26-year-old swingman has a 4.61 earned-run average in five major league games (two starts).Monday, Stewart could enjoy his parting gift. It was only the third time the Dodgers have won this season after allowing the opponent to score first.“We had some magic tonight,” Stewart said. “The guys came back and the bullpen didn’t give up anything after me. It’s a testament to everybody on this team. Definitely fun to watch.” Dodgers’ Dave Roberts says baseball’s unwritten rules ‘have changed, should change’ center_img PreviousLos Angeles Dodgers catcher Yasmani Grandal congratulates Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Kenley Jansen after they defeated the Philadelphia Phillies 5-4 at a baseball game, Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Matt Kemp #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits an RBI double as Jorge Alfaro #38 of the Philadelphia Phillies looks on during the eighth inning of a game at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)CORRECTS TO BROCK STEWART NOT JOSH FIELDS Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Brock Stewart throws during the first inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Max Muncy #13 of the Los Angeles Dodgers fields a grounder hit by Cesar Hernandez #16 of the Philadelphia Phillies during the fourth inning of a game at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Philadelphia Phillies Cesar Hernandez watches his three-run home run ball leave the park during the second inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers is unable to catch a three-run homerun hit by Cesar Hernandez #16 of the Philadelphia Phillies during the second inning of a game at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Philadelphia Phillies catcher Jorge Alfaro, left, congratulates Philadelphia Phillies second baseman Cesar Hernandez on his three-run home run against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the second inning of a baseball game Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)CORRECTS TO BROCK STEWART NOT JOSH FIELDS Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Brock Stewart throws during the first inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies in a baseball game Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)Philadelphia Phillies starting pitcher Vince Velasquez faces the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning of a baseball game Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Joc Pederson #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers doubles during the sixth inning of a game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Joc Pederson #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers doubles during the sixth inning of a game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Philadelphia Phillies starting pitcher Vince Velasquez faces the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning of a baseball game Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers slides safely into second base after hitting a single but reaching second base on a fielders error during the sixth inning of a game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers singles as Jorge Alfaro #38 of the Philadelphia Phillies looks on during the sixth inning of a game at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Joc Pederson #31 is congratulated in the dugout after scoring on a single hit by Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during the sixth inning of a game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Yasiel Puig #66 is congratulated in the dugout after scoring on a double hit by Joc Pederson #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during the sixth inning of a game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers Max Muncy, left, is caught in a rundown by Philadelphia Phillies first baseman Carlos Santana during the first inning of a baseball game Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Erik Goeddel #62 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches during the fifth inning of a game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Brock Stewart faces the Philadelphia Phillies during the second inning of a baseball game Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)Los Angeles Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner throws out Philadelphia Phillies Maikel Franco during the fifth inning of a baseball game Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)Los Angeles Dodgers second baseman Chase Utley throws out Philadelphia Phillies Nick Williams during the fifth inning of a baseball game Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)Philadelphia Phillies Jorge Alfaro gets a double as he arrives before Los Angeles Dodgers Chris Taylor can get the ball at second base during the sixth inning of a baseball game Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)Philadelphia Phillies first baseman Carlos Santana is late with the tag as Los Angeles Dodgers Cody Bellinger gets back safe during the fifth inning of a baseball game Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Cody Bellinger, left, congratulates Joc Pederson after he was driven in by Los Angeles Dodgers’ Justin Turner during the sixth inning of a baseball game, Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Yasiel Puig #66 runs to third base after a groud out by Logan Forsythe #11 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during the sixth inning of a game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig, left, and Joc Pederson celebrate after Puig was driven in for the go-ahead run by Matt Kemp during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies, Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig scores while Philadelphia Phillies catcher Jorge Alfaro waits for the throw during the eighth inning of a baseball game, Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Yasiel Puig #66 reacts after scoring on an RBI double by Matt Kemp #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during the eighth inning of a game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Kenley Jansen #74 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches during the ninth inning of a game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers catcher Yasmani Grandal congratulates Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Kenley Jansen after they defeated the Philadelphia Phillies 5-4 at a baseball game, Monday, May 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/John McCoy)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Matt Kemp #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits an RBI double as Jorge Alfaro #38 of the Philadelphia Phillies looks on during the eighth inning of a game at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)NextShow Caption1 of 29LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 28: Matt Kemp #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits an RBI double as Jorge Alfaro #38 of the Philadelphia Phillies looks on during the eighth inning of a game at Dodger Stadium on May 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. MLB players across the league are wearing special uniforms to commemorate Memorial Day. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ExpandLOS ANGELES — Just like they drew it up.The Dodgers surrendered four runs early and didn’t collect a hit for five innings, then scored three runs in the eighth inning Monday night to beat the Philadelphia Phillies 5-4.The Dodgers (25-28) have won nine of their past 11 games. The win lifted them into third place in the National League West for the first time since April 25. They’re 3-1/2 games behind the first-place Colorado Rockies, who beat the San Francisco Giants – new owners of fourth place – in extra innings.Sign up for our Inside the Dodgers newsletter. Be the best Dodger fan you can be by getting daily intel on your favorite team. Subscribe here.It was the kind of improbable, collaborative effort that the Dodgers made a habit of en route to 104 wins a year ago. This season, comeback wins have been far more rare. It was the first time the Dodgers had come back from a four-run deficit to win a game in 2018. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Whicker: Dustin May yet another example of the Dodgers’ eye for pitching The next batter, Max Muncy, tapped a ground ball back to the mound that barely eluded Morgan. He couldn’t retrieve the ball in time to throw out Hernandez, and Kemp scored from third base, tying the score 4-4.Yasmani Grandal’s two-out single through a drawn-in infield scored Hernandez, putting the Dodgers ahead 5-4.“It was kind of seeing-eye grounders, balls off gloves, dropped fly balls, things like that – we had help,” Roberts said. “But to our guys’ credit, we fought. We gave ourselves a chance. For me, the bullpen today was the key.”Brock Stewart labored at times in his four-inning start, allowing four runs. The Dodgers’ four relief pitchers combined to allow two hits, walk none and strike out five over five scoreless innings.Left-hander Scott Alexander pitched the fifth. Right-hander Erik Goeddel took the sixth. Yimi Garcia (1-1) pitched the next two and was credited with his first win since June 2015. Kenley Jansen pitched a scoreless ninth inning for his 12th save.Phillies pitcher Vince Velasquez, a graduate of Garey High School in Pomona, nearly stole the show. The Dodgers could scarcely muster hard contact against him for five innings, let alone a hit. Grandal tried to break the curse with a swinging-bunt dribbler toward a vacant third base, but Velasquez went into a slide to field the ball and throw Grandal out.The sixth inning began with Velasquez’s no-hitter still intact. It ended with two runs on Velasquez’s ledger and the game in the hands of the Phillies’ bullpen.The announced crowd of 39,759 at Dodger Stadium erupted when Puig’s line drive landed in left field for the Dodgers’ first hit. Puig kept running and made it to second base when Rhys Hoskins’ throw from left arrived late; the play was scored a single and an error.Puig advanced to third on a Logan Forsythe groundout and scored when Pederson laced a double down the left-field line. The Dodgers trailed 4-1.With two outs, Justin Turner singled to score Pederson and the Dodgers trailed 4-2.Stewart didn’t allow a hit in the first inning but the Phillies scored anyway. Hoskins reached on catcher’s interference, Stewart walked the next two hitters to load the bases, and Hoskins scampered home from third base on a wild pitch.In the second inning, Stewart allowed a pair of soft singles to Scott Kingery and Jorge Alfaro. Velasquez, the next hitter, bunted both runners up. Stewart’s first pitch to Cesar Hernandez was a fastball over the middle of the plate; Hernandez took advantage of the gift and hit the ball over the left-center field fence for a three-run home run. The Dodgers trailed 4-0.Stewart settled in and retired the final seven batters he faced. The right-hander allowed a pair of doubles in addition to the Hernandez home run, along with two singles and two walks. He struck out five, a season high.Related Articleslast_img read more

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