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Journalists increasingly exposed to violence at protests in France

first_img June 4, 2021 Find out more Tension between reporters and demonstrators is escalating at the Sivens Dam protests. Fearing for his safety, freelance reporter Eric Bouvet had to flee an event organized on 2 November in honour of Rémi Fraisse, a demonstrator killed at the dam site on 26 October. Demonstrators were circulating a photo of Bouvet along with claims that he was a police infiltrator – a situation indicative of the level of tension and incomprehension between protesters and journalists. Journalists have been prevented from taking photos and doing live TV reports from Albi and Lisle-sur-Tarn, two towns near the dam project, and in particular from the so-called “ZAD” (Zone to Defend), where the dam’s opponents have established a camp. Two journalists with the newspaper La Voix du Nord were deliberately attacked during a demonstration 900 km to the north, in Lille, on 27 October in protest against Fraisse’s death. “As soon as our photographer pulled out his camera, demonstrators grabbed him and sprayed him with a pepper spray at close range, aiming at his eyes,” deputy editor Pierre Mauchamp told Reporters Without Borders, adding that the protesters were above all targeting photographers.Grégoire Souchay, a reporter with the Reporterre specialist news site who has been covering the opposition to the Sivens Dam, said protesters do not want to be photographed or filmed, and do not trust the media. The arrival of lots of reporters, including TV crews at the start of this month, after Fraisse’s death, exacerbated the tension, with demonstrators accusing the “mainstream media” of opposing the values they defend. Using websites and social networks, the demonstrators are trying to provide their own alternative coverage of their protests. This “self-coverage” phenomenon took off during last year’s protests against the proposed Notre-Dame-des-Landes airport near Nantes, when mainstream media reporters were insulted, sometimes attacked, and denied access to the protesters.During a roundtable organized by Reporters Without Borders in July of this year, Benjamin Girette of IP3 Press said: “Journalists are increasingly being told ‘you are manipulated, we get our information by other means.’ This kind of criticism is becoming systematic and fuels violent attitudes toward the media. You eventually get to the point where the most ‘institutional’ media, especially TV channels, can no longer cover protests.” Agence France-Presse photographer Jacques Demarthon said: “Journalists are increasingly being identified with the political class, above all because of the close links between the media and political parties. TV stations are automatically excluded, even before the demonstration starts. They are called the ‘corrupt media,’ the ‘evening news permanent lie’.”“Media coverage of demonstrations is an essential part of the way democracies function,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Christophe Deloire said. “It is natural that journalists do not just reflect the image that the protesters and police have of themselves. It is the media’s job to be independent observers. Physical and verbal violence against them is alarming and indicative of contempt for the principle of public debate.”Verbal and physical violenceThe violence has been even more serious during other protests. When the National Assembly was debating the gay marriage bill in April 2013, opponents protesting outside attacked two journalists with the LCP Assemblée Nationale TV channel and damaged their equipment. Anti-gay marriage demonstrators attacked two Rennes TV journalists a few days later in Rennes. And an AFP journalist was thrown to the grounds and repeatedly kicked during an anti-gay marriage demonstration in Paris on 26 May 2013. The aggressive rhetoric used by some of the protest organizers encouraged the violence. Shortly after the “Marriage for All” law was promulgated, the “French Spring” collective issued an “agenda (…) for immediate execution” that called for the “targeting” of media “organs” that “disseminate (gender) ideology.” The “Day of Anger” protest on 26 January 2014 saw more targeted attacks against journalists covering the demonstration, especially TV crews. A Canal Plus crew, in particular, was attacked by protesters shouting “journalists, collaborators.” Canal Plus anchor Yann Barthès said during his programme the next day that “Our journalists were attacked by people who kicked them, punched them and threw beverage cans at them.” There is so much hostility that some media sometimes provide their reporters with bodyguards. The iTélé news channel, for example, uses the services of a security company when it thinks its crews need protecting.Two journalists were attacked during a demonstration by Rouen and Le Havre port workers in Haute-Normandie on 12 February. A Chaîne Normande employee was hit while stowing equipment, while a demonstrator threatened a Paris-Normandie journalist and made him pose for photos taken by other demonstrators. After an hour covering a demonstration in defence of the threatened delivery of two Mistral warships to Russia in the western port city of Saint-Nazaire on 7 September, a Canal Plus crew was chased away by angry demonstrators. Members of the Breton region’s “Bonnets Rouges” anti-tax movement attacked iTélé reporter Baptiste Cordier during a live report from Quimper in November 2013.Journalists were also attacked during pro-Gaza and pro-Israeli demonstrations this past summer, especially in the Parisian suburb of Sarcelles on 19 July. Members of minority and radical groups, or isolated individuals, were responsible for most of these attacks. The Sarcelles victims included AFP photographer Jacques Demarthon, who could not work for three weeks after someone hit him in the back, breaking his shoulder, and Laurent Troude, a freelancer working for the newspaper Libération, who could not work for eight days after a demonstrator threw a cobblestone at his back. Someone grabbed France TV cameraman Benjamin Poulain’s camera while LTL News journalist Leopold Jimmy was hit by both pro-Gaza demonstrators and members of the Jewish Defence League (LDJ). Tension fuelled by the Israeli-Palestinian conflict led to other cases of violence. LDJ members beat Jonathan Moadab of the Ruptly news agency and smashed his equipment during a protest against anti-Semitism in the Paris district of Trocadéro on 19 March. Moadab was the target of a homemade bomb in September 2012, for which two LDJ members received jail sentences in June of this year. And police advised Courrier de l’Atlas reporter Nadir Dendoune not to cover a pro-Israeli demonstration “for her own safety.”Tension between police and journalistsAsked about the obligation to protect people during demonstrations, Olivier Pouchin, the head of the CRS riot police in the Paris area, said the police intervene when demonstrators attack journalists even if the police are not given specific training in this sort of action. He stressed the need for communication between reporters and the police. If journalists report their presence to the police at the start of a protest, it is easier for the police to protect them if violent clashes ensue, he said. Journalists sometimes hamper CRS operations, he said, especially when they are located between the police and demonstrators. Pouchin also insisted that, while some demonstrators may be suspicious of the media, the CRS is not opposed to being filmed by journalists, especially as media footage has sometimes enabled the CRS to demonstrate that allegations made them were unjustified.The police are sometimes themselves responsible for violence against journalists. Yves Monteil, a freelance photographer and co-founder of Citizen Nantes who has been covering the Notre-Dame-des-Landes protests since 2009, was struck by a flash-ball round fired by a CRS member on 22 February. The flash-ball round hit him as he was using a zoom lens and mini-camera to film the police using teargas on a group of journalists. Reporterre journalist Emmanuel Daniel was manhandled by police during a protest against the Sivens Dam project in Albi on 23 September but since then no serious police misconduct has been reported in the area. “Since the incident, the police have not prevented us from working,” said Reporterre founder and former Le Monde journalist Hervé Kempf. “I went there two weeks ago. I had to wait 20 minutes at a gendarme roadblock, but after that I did not run into any other problem.” Police obstructed Montpellier Journal reporter Lucie Lecherbonnier while she was covering the eviction of squatters in the southern city of Montpellier on 23 October. She told them several times she was a reporter despite not having her press card with her but a policeman nonetheless snatched the mobile phone she was using to film and photograph the eviction.RWB’s recommendationsIn the light of the above, Reporters Without Borders reiterates its recommendation regarding media coverage of demonstrations. In particular, RWB urges all participants in demonstrations:- To respect the freedom to film and photograph, given that participating in a demonstration necessarily entails the possibility of being filmed or photographed.- To not obstruct the work of journalists, to respect their physical integrity and to respect their equipment.- To respect the confidentiality of journalists’ sources.And RWB urges the French authorities:- To implement the recommendations of UN Human Rights Council Resolution 25/38, especially paragraphs 8, 10, 12 and 13.- To pay particular attention to the safety of journalists and the protection of freedom of information during demonstrations.- To recognize that the right to information is not contingent on possession of a press card or press accreditation.- To ensure that the police receive appropriate training. Instruction on media rights, on the right to film and photograph, and on civil liberties should be included in the curricula of police academies and police on-the-job training.- To prosecute anyone who obstructs the work of journalists (by seizing their equipment, by arresting them or in any other way) or anyone who attacks them while they are covering demonstrations. – To pass legislation that makes it an offence, with criminal penalties, for any public official to obstruct freedom of information.- To pass legislation protecting the confidentiality of journalists’ sources and prohibiting the seizure of their equipment.- To create a system for compensating journalists for medical expenses resulting from injuries or for confiscation or destruction of equipment. to go further RSF denounces Total’s retaliation against Le Monde for Myanmar story News Violence against journalists is becoming more and more common at all kinds of demonstrations in France, including the “Manif pour Tous” protests against same-sex marriage and the recent protests against the proposed Sivens Dam in the southern department of Tarn. Journalists have been telling Reporters Without Borders about the difficulties they increasingly encounter while trying to cover protests and the hostility to which they are exposed. Follow the news on France May 10, 2021 Find out more News RSF_en Receive email alerts FranceEurope – Central Asia News November 14, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalists increasingly exposed to violence at protests in France FranceEurope – Central Asia News June 2, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information Organisation “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EUlast_img read more

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Report: Rockets land Iman Shumpert in three-way trade with Kings, Cavaliers

first_imgFebruary 7, 2019 /Sports News – National Report: Rockets land Iman Shumpert in three-way trade with Kings, Cavaliers Beau Lund FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLeon Halip/Getty Images(HOUSTON) — The Houston Rockets have reportedly landed guard Iman Shumpert from the Sacramento Kings in a three-team trade that also involves the Cleveland Cavaliers.As part of the deal, the Rockets will send guard Brandon Knight and forward Marquese Chriss, along with a 2019 first-round pick, to the Cavaliers, league sources tell ESPN.Cleveland, meanwhile, will send guard Alec Burks to Sacramento, while Cavs guards Nik Stauskas and Wade Baldwin go to Houston, according to the sources.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.center_img Written bylast_img read more

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The Story of BRO

first_img “Who’s Blue Ridge Outdoors?”A guy in jean cut-off shorts is standing next to me, shirtless, sweating in the late August heat and casually sipping out of a pint glass at Ocoee Fest. He’s barefoot and a little drunk—standard protocol for any kayaking festival.“It’s a free regional magazine based out of Charlottesville, ” I begin, launching into my elevator speech on Blue Ridge Outdoors. As travel editor, I have answered this question hundreds of times before. Despite having had a few beers myself, I switch into cruise control and let my mouth do the talking while my brain reels in the shocking aftermath of his question.For shame, I think to myself. How can you not know what Blue Ridge Outdoors is?!Maybe he lives under a rock, I reason. He is a raft guide, after all. Even so, the river he works on, the Ocoee River, is in the heart of our coverage. His job, his passions, are our bread and butter. There is no excuse for this ignorance.“Oh!” he says after my spiel is over. The light bulb comes on. His eyes widen and I feel a faint flicker of hope. “I bought my first backpack from you guys!”Not quite.Blue Ridge Mountain Sports, a Virginia-based outdoor outfitter, is what most newcomers to the magazine associate with when they hear “Blue Ridge Outdoors.”I sigh, abandoning my disappointment in the raft guide’s failed realization. It’s not his fault. I hand him a sticker with our motto, “Go Outside and Play,” and a copy of the latest issue. He thanks me, raising his glass to the sky before taking a drink and rejoining the festivities. Later that night, I would see the same guy thrashing about in front of the stage, moving surprisingly in-rhythm with the band. When the music had stopped, he turned to leave and saw me near the middle of the pack.“Hey!” he shouted. “It’s the chick from Blue Ridge Outdoors!”Well, I thought, at least he remembered the magazine’s name.He barreled through the crowd to give me a high five. The bumper sticker I’d given him earlier was slapped crookedly across his bare chest. I smiled. Mission accomplished.SPEND YOUR MONEY ON SPORTS…WE’RE FREE.Just two decades ago, I wouldn’t have been so surprised to learn that this raft guide from Tennessee was unfamiliar with the publication. In fact, 20 years ago, my job, and that of more than half the magazine’s present-day staff, wouldn’t have even existed.Born in a windowless basement on 220 South Street in Charlottesville, Va., Blue Ridge Outdoors barely resembled the comprehensive regional publication it is today. Created by outdoor enthusiast John Blackburn, a graduate student at the University of Virginia and a contributing journalist for C-Ville Weekly, the early pages of BRO only covered Charlottesville-based adventures—directions to Blue Hole, best hikes in the Shenandoah National Park, how Devils Knob got its name. Everything was black and white, and the first three issues in 1995 were tucked neatly into the folds of C-Ville Weekly as a seasonal insert.“Most business startups fail,” says Rob Jiranek, BRO’s first publisher and, at the time, publisher for C-Ville Weekly. “The chances of having a magazine actually succeed back then were about 1 in 11. It was like getting into Harvard.”Despite the odds against them, Jiranek and Blackburn made the most of those early days and their five-person team. Just two years later, the magazine became a monthly, though its content remained limited to the mountains of Virginia.“It was a real petri dish of outdoor creativity,” says Jiranek of the office dynamic.With no budget for photography, Blackburn used his own pictures to accompany the stories, most of which he wrote himself. The staff at BRO sold ads by day, wrote stories at night, and somehow managed so scrape together an impressive issue each month. Part regional events calendar, part storytelling platform, the early issues of the magazine were characterized by witty writing and the authentic voices of writers who lived and breathed adventure in the Blue Ridge.By 2001, the team decided to spread the magazine’s coverage farther south and open a North Carolina office in Asheville. The decision would mark an important turning point in the growth of the magazine, setting the stage for BRO to evolve as the region’s definitive resource for outdoor adventure.A CHANGING LANDSCAPEWill Harlan was the first employee hired at the new North Carolina office. A top trail runner and outdoor writer, he became the magazine’s editor-in-chief, a position he has held for the past 14 years. As BRO’s most senior staffer, Harlan has helped the magazine expand its content and reach.“It’s a privilege working with this team. They are like family,” Harlan says. “The magazine has grown and evolved over the years, but we’ve always stayed true to our roots—edgy, original, authentic content.”Travis Searcy, who was hired a few months after Harlan, knows all-too-well just how far the magazine has grown. Brought on as a graphic designer in the Charlottesville office, Searcy says the layout process, called a “paste-up,” didn’t use PDFs or Adobe design software—all he needed was a printer, some scissors, and a little glue.“I would literally paste the ads onto the pages, then we’d mail that to the press, they’d photograph it, make plates, then print the magazine,” Searcy says.The layout process wasn’t the only thing that evolved. Steven McBride, a North Carolina-based photographer who has published the most BRO covers, remembers when he used to FedEx transparency slides to Harlan for cover photo submissions.“Back in the film days, everything was different,” McBride says. “Cameras were bigger and heavier. Lighting was harder to deal with. Photoshop back then was barely in existence.”But what BRO lacked in production resources, it made up for ten-fold in its unquestionable commitment to providing quality content. The magazine flourished. As the years passed, technology improved seemingly overnight, website redesigns came and went, and distribution doubled. By the time the magazine’s future owner, Blake DeMaso, got his hands on BRO, the publication had extended its editorial content to include adventures as far south as Georgia all the way up through West Virginia.“I love the mountains and I love the Blue Ridge. It’s where I grew up,” DeMaso says. “I identified with the magazine from day one.”The year was 2003 and DeMaso, having worked for several years in publishing for Condé Nast, was ready for a change in pace. He approached Jiranek near the end of the year about possibly becoming a business partner, and ended up with more than he bargained for. By March of 2004, DeMaso was the new owner of BRO.“I was only 30 years old, and I was very scared,” DeMaso remembers. “I was now in charge of a monthly magazine, a website that was six months out-of-date, five employees in Charlottesville, three in North Carolina, eight computers, a copier machine, a fax machine that didn’t really work, and a ping pong table.”But, really, what more do you need?PLAY HARD, WORK HARDThe Charlottesville BRO headquarters fit in one room. Located in a basement, the place had shoddy Internet and a drafty window. In the winter, staff wore fingerless gloves to keep their hands warm while they worked.“I used a desk made out of cardboard boxes for at least three months,” DeMaso says.With a ping-pong table in the middle of the room, a dartboard on the wall, and a regular littering of broken rubber bands on the floor from the daily rubber band wars, the first BRO office looked less like a magazine headquarters and more like a frat house.But when you play hard, you work hard, too. Thanks to the early efforts of a passionate group of people, the magazine is now distributed from Atlanta to Baltimore and covers adventures from Kentucky to the coast. Not long after DeMaso took over, the staff doubled in size, the magazine became full-color throughout, it expanded its page counts, added a glossy cover, and revamped its logo. The best part? It remained a free publication.“The goal from day one was always to provide free information to inspire people to go outside,” DeMaso says. “I think our goal will never change.”The stories that fill the magazine’s pages now reach over 300,000 readers every month. The advent of social media platforms brought new ways of engaging an ever-expanding audience and sharing news in real time. The magazine’s presence at regional events swelled to over 30 in a season with regular co-hosting of other races, music festivals, and events across the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic.Yet despite the changes, at its core, Blue Ridge Outdoors remains dedicated to the founding principle of the passion project that Jiranek and Blackburn gave life to: the idea that the great outdoors encompasses more than just the places where we play—they represent a way of living, a story worth telling, an environment in need of protecting, and a wildness within that we all are preserving. last_img read more

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Sandwich spread

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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March Madness 2019: Did Lamonte Turner foul Carsen Edwards at end of regulation?

first_imgSome of it came in the form of Lamonte Turner’s foul of Carsen Edwards with two seconds remaining in regulation. Edwards missed his 3-point attempt, but the foul sent him to the line, where he hit two of three attempts to knot the game 82-82 and force OT. The Boilermakers eventually won 99-94.SN’s MARCH MADNESS HQLive NCAA bracket | Live scoreboard | Full TV scheduleThe internet, it seems, can’t agree wither Turner should have been called for the foul. The play in question, for review:Upon further review … The foul call that gave Carsen Edwards three free throws at the close of regulation should never have been awarded. Terrible foul call. pic.twitter.com/hGklaoBXlZ— Kyle Boone (@Kyle__Boone) March 29, 2019Tennessee coach Rick Barnes told reporters after the game he thought it was a foul. Turner, for his part, said it shouldn’t have been called. Thursday’s Sweet 16 matchup between 2-seed Tennessee and 3-seed Purdue was a phenomenal game, one of the best thus far in the 2019 NCAA Tournament. It featured lights-out shooting from both teams, a tremendous comeback by the Volunteers and an overtime finish.It also featured a fair amount of controversy. “I told the refs all game, ‘(Edwards is) kicking his legs out every time he shoots,'” he told reporters after the game (per Bleacher Report).While it does look like Edwards extends his leg — and that Turner did attempt to avoid bumping him on his way down — Turner did touch him in the air with his right hip.In the end, it was a judgment call, and certainly not an egregious one. That may be cold comfort for Volunteers fans, but they can take solace, perhaps, in the fact their team played one of the most exciting games of this tournament.last_img read more

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